Trip Planning Regards To Routes

Topic 16527 | Page 5

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DynaMike13's Comment
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QC will make you avoid toll roads and sometimes send through a local town or whatever. I follow my gamin GPS instead. I don't care if they save money because they don't care about my miles. **** 'em

Tractor Man's Comment
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QC will make you avoid toll roads and sometimes send through a local town or whatever. I follow my gamin GPS instead. I don't care if they save money because they don't care about my miles. **** 'em

Great Attitude Mike! That'll get you a long way in this Business! You should save those type of comments for TruckersReport. They thrive on them over there.

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HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Joseph L.'s Comment
member avatar

About a week and half ago we were out in Iowa or Illinois and got sent information for a load to be picked up after sending in the Marco 1 to confirm we would be getting the load , the trainer started putting the information into his GPS unit. Right as he was finishing putting in the information the GPS/ directional guide unit went off line. After failing to get it restarted. We went old school we broke out the atlas (two of them) mine because it's pages are laminate and we could mark on it and the trainers to check low clearance hazards on our route. Turns out there was none. We checked the area were we going to be delivering too using Google maps. Once we got that figure out. We headed out. We actually used Google maps starting out. It had us on the freeway (the I70 going west) which was a normal travel route for us. The trainer advise me to be careful because Google maps has a way of redirecting you into some nasty spots. We had to rely on my phone for directions. About two hours into the run we directed to keep left at certain point (we did as it was the direction we needed to go) then my phone lost coverage. The trainer also didn't have coverage. So we relied on the atlas, kept an eye on the signs and drove on. Finally we stopped for a bathroom break. When we left the trainers navigational system had started working again. It was nice to have it again while I drove. But it was also nice to know I could take the route directions sent to me by the company and find them in an atlas and figure out my way from point A to point B and then to point C. Safely.

Rob D.'s Comment
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I had question about "legal truck routes" based on a scenic route that I had taken from Kingdom City to Pacific. The route that I took would be about the same distance from Kingdom City to the intersection of I-270 and I-44 but would allow you to avoid traffic in the western part of St. Louis. However, when I looked at the Rand McNally Motor Carriers Atlas, the highways I took were not highlighted in orange at "legal truck routes." I could not find a user-friendly summary of what makes a route a "legal truck route" in the Rand McNally Atlas either from Rickipedia on Trucking Truth or the internet generally. Also, I couldn't find a user-friendly summary of what happens if you take a route other than a route designated as "legal truck route" in the Rand McNally Atlas. Missouri does not have a specific violation or penalty for traveling along a highway other than the National Highway Network.

But after reading the explanation of the "State Access Policies" in the Rand McNally and researching Missouri State statutes, I think I found the answer, but I want to make sure I'm on the right track.

I understand that it involves the interrelation between Federal law and state law. Federal law limits the restrictions that states may impose on length, height, width, and weight for commercial vehicles on National Highway Network Roads. I understand this is "National Weight and Size Provisions" table in the Rand McNally Atlas. The "legal truck routes" highlighted in orange are National Highway Network Roads. So long as you stay on the orange highlighted roads, you're safe. (Subject to other limitations and restrictions shown in the Rand McNally Atlas).

At I mentioned, Missouri does not impose a penalty for leaving the National Highway Network. However, if you travel on a Missouri State highway not designated as part of the National Highway Network, you must know and not exceed the length, height, width, and weight limitations generally applicable in Missouri. In Missouri, those would be 60' (all highways) or 65' (primary highways; I couldn't find a list) length, 102" width, 13'6" height, and 20,000 lbs (steer axle), 34,000 lbs each (tandem axle) and 80,000 total weight. In addition, to the general statewide limitations, you might also encounter low clearances, bridge weight limitations, and other restrictions if you travel on a Missouri State highway not designated as part of the National Highway Network.

So if you did travel on such "other highways" in Missouri you wouldn't necessarily get a ticket for leaving the National Highway Network. Rather, you would most likely get a ticket for exceeding either the length or height limitations, which Missouri statewide limitations are less than the National Highway Network limitations.

Please let me know where I've misunderstood something.

DISCLAIMER: I am not a driver and this post should not be used as authority to travel Missouri State highways not designated at "legal truck routes in the Rand McNally Motor Carrier's Atlas

Links to Missouri Statutes:

Missouri Statute 304.170: Length, Height and Width Regulations

Missouri Statute 304.180 Weight Limitations

I have also included a link to the other thread where "out of route" trip planning was discussed.

Prime Out of Route Tolerance Posts

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I think you pretty much nailed it Rob, word for word.

A good grasp of the detailed instructions within the atlas will keep your routing legal. State and federal restrictions are explained with clarity, and height/weight restricted routes are also indicated per state.

Local restrictions are trickier, though. It still pays to be extra vigilant of all signage.

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