Be Sure To Read Your State Manual Before Taking The Written Test.

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Terry S.'s Comment
member avatar

It's a good thing I decided to switch from the High road CDL training program to my States (WA) Cdl Manual. Some of the obvious differences that could have failed me. The high road..Perception distance 3/4 sec. 60'. Reaction distance 3/4 sec. 60'. Braking distance 170'. Total 290'. WA state manual...Perception distance 1 3/4 sec 142'. Reaction distance 61'. Braking distance 216'. Total effective stopping distance 419' (everything at 55mph) The Highg Road...Max height of a rig 13'6"...Wa state 14'. These are just some of the many diffferences.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!
It's a good thing I decided to switch from the High road CDL training program to my States (WA) Cdl Manual. Some of the obvious differences that could have failed me

No, the differences aren't even going to come close to failing you. As Daniel pointed out, 97% of all of the manuals are identical. There are very, very few differences and the ones that exist are rather minor specifics that will have absolutely no effect on whether or not you'll pass the test nor will they matter at all once you get out on the highway.

We spent about 3 months building the program from the Illinois CDL Manual and it would have taken a year if we would have worried about the other 3% and built 48 versions of the program instead of one. It would have made no sense to do that.

Not only that, but a ton of people live in one state, transfer to another state to go through a Company-Sponsored Training Program, then have to transfer their license back. So we would have had ten times the amount of confusion over which test to take. And to make matters worse, people often don't know until the last minute where they'll be going to school. So there's no way to know which of the state courses they should take until they knew what state they'll be testing in and by that time it's probably too late to complete our program before training starts.

So rest assured, regardless of the state you live in you can take our High Road Training Program and score above a 95% on your CDL permit exam and your endorsement exams even if they ask about every little detail that's different between the manuals and you miss all of those questions. It's not going to matter a bit.

But we have had dozens of people study the High Road and aced all their tests including me.

Indeed I get reports seven days a week from people that are either acing their permit and endorsement exams or getting high 90's. So far we've had 4,184 people use our program and we're signing up an average of about 400-500 per month. Many of those people are being referred to us by the actual CDL schools they're attending and there are several schools that use our program in their classroom straight off the website.

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

But you did touch on a very important point. Reading your own State Cdl manual. Part of being a professional driver is knowing the laws of your State and the States you will drive in. As for your permit we tend to want to just get by. I know that I read it here somewhere about reading your own manual. Not sure where.

The fact that you noticed the difference shows how much you have learned. You have given all a good heads up and great advice. I found that with the Ga. test that all the questions in the test your knowledge box at the end of each section are on the test.

Just to throw this out there, "No harm, No foul."

Lot of Ga. Boys coming on here. You yanks better watch out. I got back up now.shocked.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Starcar's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

It would be impossible for Brett to have EVERYTHING for EVERY state in his High Road Training Program..Pre-Trip Study Guide... CDL Practice Tests..It has always been advised to read your own states permit manual. This is the BEST site on the web for preparing to get your permit, go to cdl school..and all the rest. Brett is great at what he does, and does the best at what he does. But sometimes people just need to stand up on their own hindlegs and take responsibility for their situation and education. If you can't do it now, you won't be able to handle it on the road.....

Brett, you can now slap my hand....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Danny S.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah I found this true in the Georgia CDL manual, they must have updated it since Brett did the one here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Wow great minds do think alike. I was just looking at GA's website and took their practice test. Well I at first thought it was theirs. Several of the questions were worded much differently and a couple answers were different. But after looking over the entire practice test it was my belief it was outdated, not this one. Just my opinion. Nevertheless your point is a very good one. We have to be totally prepared for what our own state throws at us. The GA DDS website linked me to a private site for layover.com. It looked like a recruiting site for the trucking industry.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Danny, I am gearing up to take the GA permit test could I impose on you to share specific's with me about major differences I should be ready for?

Danny S.'s Comment
member avatar

The only thing I have seen so far is about is about stopping distance. It is under section 2.6.1 I haven't seen any others but it will be a good idea to particularly reread the general knowledge section.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Guys, it says right there on the High Road Training Program that its based on the IL manual. 97% of the material is the same for every state. You found that 3% that might not be. But we have had dozens of people study the High Road and aced all their tests including me.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Daniel, I saw that it was based on IL. And I agree it's probably at least 97% the same or at least close as can be reasonably expected. I don't think any of us thought otherwise, cause if it had not been for the high road program I've done I would not have even come close on the so called state practice test. We were I believe only pointing it out as a reminder. I still did pretty well on the general knowledge test and if it would have been real I would have passed my first time through. I did much better on the air brake and combo tests. Which really bugged me at first because the air brake section of this program I really struggled with. The memorizing numbers and keeping them straight in my head drove me crazy, but not as crazy as the log books. What really helped was the way the program kept putting me back into the questions I was having trouble with. That was a pain as I went through, but I firmly believe had it not done that I would still be struggling. I have all the respect in the world in this program.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!
It's a good thing I decided to switch from the High road CDL training program to my States (WA) Cdl Manual. Some of the obvious differences that could have failed me

No, the differences aren't even going to come close to failing you. As Daniel pointed out, 97% of all of the manuals are identical. There are very, very few differences and the ones that exist are rather minor specifics that will have absolutely no effect on whether or not you'll pass the test nor will they matter at all once you get out on the highway.

We spent about 3 months building the program from the Illinois CDL Manual and it would have taken a year if we would have worried about the other 3% and built 48 versions of the program instead of one. It would have made no sense to do that.

Not only that, but a ton of people live in one state, transfer to another state to go through a Company-Sponsored Training Program, then have to transfer their license back. So we would have had ten times the amount of confusion over which test to take. And to make matters worse, people often don't know until the last minute where they'll be going to school. So there's no way to know which of the state courses they should take until they knew what state they'll be testing in and by that time it's probably too late to complete our program before training starts.

So rest assured, regardless of the state you live in you can take our High Road Training Program and score above a 95% on your CDL permit exam and your endorsement exams even if they ask about every little detail that's different between the manuals and you miss all of those questions. It's not going to matter a bit.

But we have had dozens of people study the High Road and aced all their tests including me.

Indeed I get reports seven days a week from people that are either acing their permit and endorsement exams or getting high 90's. So far we've had 4,184 people use our program and we're signing up an average of about 400-500 per month. Many of those people are being referred to us by the actual CDL schools they're attending and there are several schools that use our program in their classroom straight off the website.

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Danny S.'s Comment
member avatar

I agree and I don't want any of you think I think the High Road Training is not to be used. I think the way the program is put is excellent by breaking it d o w n into bite size pieces and the effectiveness of the questions m as me learning so much more effective. As I said that's all I have seen that is different is those distances which to me is no big deal. I just have remember the few little differences and if that is all I miss on the test it would not be the end of the world. I'm not going to have to take this part of the to get my permit because I already have my class B the only place I will be tested on this is in the classroom at school. Most o f the CDL exams are just common sense questions you just have to take your time and read each question and each answer and the right answer is usually pretty obvious. Usually when I get a wrong answer it is because I got into a hurry and didn't read the answers thoroughly. Sorry If I brought confusion to any of you, not intentional.nullsorry.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

I agree very much, as I said I have taken all the course needed for the permit test and had it not been for this program I know I would have failed big time. You all are to be commended on how you have created this entire website. It is first rate all the way. I have a strong background in computer and hands on driver training that spans over 12 years. It never involved big rigs though. I have been a consultant in driver training to some very large private and gov't agencies, so believe me I have seen a lot of training programs both hands on and simulator. Some have been very good and some have been very poor. I do wish you would get the iphone downloads available though. Hint Hint. Sorry if my earlier comments offended anyone or caused confussion.

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