Any Teams At Prime Running Over 5000 Miles? How About Others?

Topic 16729 | Page 1

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Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

I have 12,000 miles left on my 40000 trainer miles at Prime. TNT student, should get my truck in 3-4 weeks. The last 3 weeks we ran 3781, 4589, 4178 miles/wk.

My trainer is an "A" guy. We have discussed running hard- the number 1 consideration in everything we do is keeping the wheels turning- is making Good money.

Just read that Sue D is turning 20,000/mth.

So what miles are other teams running?

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

UpShift's Comment
member avatar

My 1st 3-loads as TNT were 6,024 loaded miles. 390 empty miles. I'll up date as we go.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

My first TNT trainer and I did less miles than I do solo. The second one we did 12,000 in two weeks... But they only a couple showers hardly stopped to eat...hr was the intermodal guy so notnsure that made a difference. We basically shuttle trailers and couke be at the same customer two or three times in one day.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Kanelin's Comment
member avatar

We have been running 4200-4800. Best week was 5300, worst was 3000. That was thanks to a 2 stop meat load that we waited 21 hours for at the shipper. Threw the whole thing off.

I am right around 30k now, should be back in Springboro Thursday for upgrade!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

We have been running 4200-4800. Best week was 5300, worst was 3000. That was thanks to a 2 stop meat load that we waited 21 hours for at the shipper. Threw the whole thing off.

I am right around 30k now, should be back in Springboro Thursday for upgrade!

Whoooo hooooo

Be sure to ask about the optional company reefer and elogs class. They have a ton of info and really explain things. If they don't have the elog class.. Talk to Wendy in logs. She's a blond who sits behind driver line up. She is SO nice and will explain the 8/2 and other log stuff to maximize your drive time :) I really believe talking to her made me understand his to manage my clock as good as I do.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kanelin's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

We have been running 4200-4800. Best week was 5300, worst was 3000. That was thanks to a 2 stop meat load that we waited 21 hours for at the shipper. Threw the whole thing off.

I am right around 30k now, should be back in Springboro Thursday for upgrade!

double-quotes-end.png

Whoooo hooooo

Be sure to ask about the optional company reefer and elogs class. They have a ton of info and really explain things. If they don't have the elog class.. Talk to Wendy in logs. She's a blond who sits behind driver line up. She is SO nice and will explain the 8/2 and other log stuff to maximize your drive time :) I really believe talking to her made me understand his to manage my clock as good as I do.

I will. Planning on taking every class they have to offer, and asking a ton of questions.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Ken C.'s Comment
member avatar

Don't know many guys at Prime getting good miles (5000 +) or revenue right now...they seem to be really slow but things will pick up again once the Snow Starts falling...Oct to Feb were my best months...

Ken C.

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

Wow-some good responses. Just what I was hoping for.

Thanks again Brett for your website!

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

The problem with teaming is the same with being new or going lease ...you have to prove yourself. You won't get the miles in the beginning until you prove reliable.....and as a team you BOTH must be reliable. If one of you is running 550 miles a shift and the other does 330...you won't make it. If your teammate stops for a nao and you are asleep and they over sleep...you won't make it.

I know new teams who thought that coming right out of training would be better to have someone to help spot or give input instead of being solo. Can be true. But having to prove themselves to be reliable takes time. So the few teams I knew were getting around 4000 per week. Most of the successful teams I know now are married couples. Don't know too many who aren't unless trainers.

Two new lease ops couldn't get out of the hole so they took on drivers to team....it didn't help them. The teammates left to go company cause they could make more money solo. atnd one lease op quit prime altogether... The other joined an experienced driver to team cause she couldn't hack leasing or being solo.

The BEST thing to do if you want to team is find an experienced team driver who is looking for someone new. There is more to teaning than just getting a few extra miles...you really need to like the person you are with. And you need to add the miles and see if it is worth it.

There was one team splitting up when I upgraded and they said it was like a divorce. One of the supervisor s had to split everything like a divorce lawyer...after 5 years of teaming together they were arguing over who paid for the TV satellite microwaves fridge etc lol

Talk to the FM or even several..just walk around the reefer dispatch and ask them if they have any good drivers looking for a team mate. FM make commission off our loads....so if we run hard they make more money. If you like your TNT trainer ask of you can stay after upgrading. Alot will do it cause of the shortage of TNT students and its easier to sleep now that they trust your driving.

I guarantee one will like your initiative and hook you up. Good luck

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Sorry to diverge from teaming....but when you upgrade be sure to look through the empty trailers at prime for load locks. No need to pay $80 or so when you can get them for free. If you can pay cash....ask on FB if any drivers are selling used ones. Also be sure to tell the store clerk you are a company driver. I think they charged me for my detention stamp...but someone else told me company drivers don't have to pay for them.

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