That I-80 Video That Was Posted From Wyoming Really Shook Me Up.

Topic 17275 | Page 2

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Am i the only one that didn't see any brake lights on any of those trucks?

I was wondering if it was point of view cause I didn't see tail lights or hazards on. That's nuts.

I felt bad for CRST cause he looked slower than the others then looked close to flipping.

I'd probably have the hazards on and run away. Better than getting hit eight more times by other trucks lol

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Vendingdude's Comment
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There is another video or two of this incident from the perspective of other people. One is a compilation of three different recordings I think; the last bit on that one is actually the CRST driver on his own phone bailing out as soon as he's stopped. You can hear more crunches as he's screaming at his co-driver to hurry to get out the drivers side. Scary stuff indeed.

There's another video from a guy in the back that walks the aftermath of the accident from the rear to the front and back to his truck. He also lays blame on a couple of hot dogs as he narrates.

And yes it doesn't look like you can see side hazards on any trucks, but if some did have their 4ways on it would be difficult to see from the distance and quality of the phone making this recording. It would be hard to see brake lights from this angle as well for the same reason, not to mention the kicked up slush and snow would contribute to their obscurity. Virtually all of the trucks, however, were braking at some point as you can clearly hear them pumping the brakes in an attempt to slow down without locking up the trailer.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I just watched the one suggested where he walks through the wreckage....holy crap. Wow just wow. That is terrifying.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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In a third video from a different angle, the camera guy says "this road is solid ice. What were these truckers doing out here?"

Uh what was anyone doing out there car or truck? I'm parking in ice. Screw that

LDRSHIP's Comment
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My instructor at school played thru pieces of a couple different ones. It was a training aid on what you shouldn't do during winter driving. Also to reinforce his point about shutting down. The only thing he said about CBs is that no one really uses them anymore.

G-Town's Comment
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My instructor at school played thru pieces of a couple different ones. It was a training aid on what you shouldn't do during winter driving. Also to reinforce his point about shutting down. The only thing he said about CBs is that no one really uses them anymore.

It's a shame if that's all he said about CBs. For some his words basically minimize the need for a one.

LDRSHIP's Comment
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I agree. I grew up with my father driving truck. He still drives. Been at it now for just shy of 45 years. I remember vividly going on the road with him some summers. I always enjoyed it. Seeing new places, hearing different dialects. He would have me navigate using the Atlas. I was 6, but he taught me what everything meant in it. I especially remember all the chatter on the CB. Drivers letting others know about traffic, accidents, locations of the law, status of weight stations. Drivers asking each other for directions, best places to fuel, park, and eat. The CB never had a quiet moment. It saddens me, that I can go miles on end today and you hardly hear a peep on the CB. It was such an enjoyable part of being in the truck. I even had a book that had all the trucker slang in it and definitions. Like a plain wrapper was an under cover police car.

Btw, this was in the early 80s. When my father was an O/O. He had a green GMC cab over. He drove for Perkins furniture.

G-Town's Comment
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Patrick wrote:

Btw, this was in the early 80s. When my father was an O/O. He had a green GMC cab over. He drove for Perkins furniture.

Your Dad probably drove either a "Crackerbox" or more likely an Astro 95. There are a ton of photos of these trucks. If you have time to Google it, you will see numerous examples of this truck.

Dan E.'s Comment
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In a third video from a different angle, the camera guy says "this road is solid ice. What were these truckers doing out here?"

Uh what was anyone doing out there car or truck? I'm parking in ice. Screw that

I questioned the same thing but I know that here in the mountains of WV you may be driving on wet roads and just as you top a mountain you instantly enter a winter wonderland. I don't know if that is what happened here but I know that it is possible especially considering the elevation in Wyoming. Thank God that more weren't killed.

G-Town's Comment
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Dan E wrote:

I questioned the same thing but I know that here in the mountains of WV you may be driving on wet roads and just as you top a mountain you instantly enter a winter wonderland. I don't know if that is what happened here but I know that it is possible especially considering the elevation in Wyoming. Thank God that more weren't killed.

Exactly why I mentioned the concept of situational awareness,...driving along,road appear wet, low visibility and the air temperature is hovering around 32'F. What do you do...? For starters SLOW DOWN and put the 4-ways on and guard your space. This means avoid bunching or packing with other vehicles (especially trucks) and double your following distance. Second watch your mirrors for spray coming off the tandems...if it stops you are on ice. Always look for a place to "bail", safely avoiding a situation. Common sense...

I have seen many videos like that, and to me (like Miracle said) most of the trucks (especially FedEx) were driving way to fast for those conditions. Madness.

Thankfully and miraculously there were no fatalities in the April 16th wreck in the video. 4 days later near Laramie WY, a similar wreck in similar conditions there were two fatalities.

This will be my fourth winter...thankfully although I have seen my share of winter crashes, I have not been involved in one.

For those of you about to go through your first winter...be careful when the weather gets dicey and shut down if in doubt. No one at your employer will question your judgment for doing that.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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