That I-80 Video That Was Posted From Wyoming Really Shook Me Up.

Topic 17275 | Page 1

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Dan E.'s Comment
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The sounds of those trucks crashing one after another was tough to watch and to listen to. I can't understand why so many drivers were traveling that fast in those conditions. Are there that many dangerous drivers on the road driving trucks?

This video should be shown in driving school to every new driver IMO. Unbelievable that so many more weren't killed. God was watching out for some of those people that day.

Wyoming I-80 Crash While it Happens

Blinding conditions and icy roads lead to a gigantic wreck on I-80 in Wyoming in 2015

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Maurice R.'s Comment
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The sounds of those trucks crashing one after another was tough to watch and to listen to. I can't understand why so many drivers were traveling that fast in those conditions. Are there that many dangerous drivers on the road driving trucks?

This video should be shown in driving school to every new driver IMO. Unbelievable that so many more weren't killed. God was watching out for some of those people that day.

I know brother. I just watched it and I'm in cdl school now. I'm going to ask my trainer to show that video tomorrow to the class! It produces a healthy respect and shows us that speed is a killer and also that the cb radio is important to have even if you don't use it! God bless!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dan E.'s Comment
member avatar

Be safe my friend. I would rather have people angrily honking horns and passing me than to be involved in something like that. A couple of drivers impressed me especially the Walmart driver. That was scary and I will definitely have a CB from day 1.

sculpy's Comment
member avatar

As someone going to CDL school soon, I admit the same video/s shook me up a bit as well. I can think that i'll be a safe driver; maintaining a safe following distance and proper speed given conditions when i'm out on the road, and say to myself that something like this won't happen to me...

The thing that shook me though, is the fact that EVEN IF I was one of the safe drivers who safely stopped in time and did everything right, I could still end-up minced because of any number of drivers behind me who might not be being so careful, as evidenced in those WY I-80 accidents.

I just try not to think about that too much, heh.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It really does sound like a shotgun going off. Some of those impacts were awful. You'd see a truck disappear between some vehicles, it would be quiet for a second or so, and then baaaaam.........awful.

I always use this video to demonstrate why I think everyone should have a CB radio. It's a matter of life and death sometimes.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Similar situation on I-78 last winter (east of I-81). Chain reaction event during white-out conditions with a significant cross-wind.

A CB can definitely warn a driver of pending doom up ahead. A lifesaver that should not be overlooked.

I cannot however stress the importance of situational awareness and adjusting accordingly; listen to the CB, throw-on the 4-ways, headlights-on, reduce speed, significantly increase following distance, guard your space, and increase overall focus and attention during conditions like this. Not the time to kick-back and settle in to the "tunes" and just roll along like it was "just another day". I know the video is gut wrenching...but speed was likely a major contributing factor to that pile-up. If you cannot see four truck lengths in front of you, "back 'er down and do it quick". Same with thick fog, very dangerous. Get on the CB and warn other drivers noting the route, direction you are heading, and mile-marker.

In conditions like that, ignore the ego, and safely shutdown when there is opportunity to do so and wait it out.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Stresses the importance of CB Radio in conditions like this - you don't necessarily have to listen to all the jaw-jackin that goes on normally - but in hazardous weather conditions it can be difference between pulling off or SLIDING OFF.

Combination of poor visibility and slick roads.

I watched a few seasons of "Highway Through Hell" recently - about a Canadian Heavy Hauling Wrecker company - one that hauls TRUCKS out of ditches, etc., on one of the worst mountain passes in Western Canada. Some of the wrecks were mind-numbing, as well as seeing how huge heavy rigs - EVEN WITH CHAINS - can lose traction and start sliding. At that point, it's gravity, momentum and GOD that decide where you end up - the DRIVER is merely a PASSENGER. Truck cabs are fiberglass and sheet metal - once you get 80K lbs of rig rolling around in directions it wasn't meant to go - there's actually very little protection.

And don't feel like a wussy - if conditions start to look like something you aren't going to be comfortable driving in safely. PARK THE TRUCK. Better to reschedule, than be filling out accident reports from a hospital bed - or having your family trying to figure out how to get your body home.

Also - if you're heading into a region with conditions that may turn into ROAD CLOSURES - it would be smart to lay in a supply of water and a day or two worth of nutrition. Even if you're stuck in a truck stop - with no roads open, the food supplies THERE will run out in a day or two. If you're stuck there - eat the TS FOOD, so you can maintain your emergency supply.

Rick

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

In conditions like that, ignore the ego, and safely shutdown when there is opportunity to do so and wait it out.

This right here. And until you can shut down safely, go slow! Adjust you're speed not only to the road condition, but also to your visibility. Almost every single one of those trucks was going too fast for the conditions. They couldn't see and by the time they could, they couldn't stop.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Yep, and as.was.mentioned, even if you do the right thing, you can still be the victim of someone else not doing the right thing.

I would suggest, if you see what is going on, try to find a good place to get off the road, even if you have to dive into the ditch. Better to have to call a wrecker to get you unstuck than have to have your truck towed because someone plowed into the back off you. If this would be a bad idea, someone correct me, but I'm thinking that it would be better than having your truck totaled.

Dominick V.'s Comment
member avatar

Am i the only one that didn't see any brake lights on any of those trucks?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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