Approved Footwear For Trucking - The LAW

Topic 17803 | Page 2

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Rick S.'s Comment
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Lol. hey when i hit Wyoming port of entry I'll ask em.

While you're at it - ask em it they can cite you for violations of company policy too. Someone in the last discussion alleged that also.

And let's KEEP IT CIVIL - so a discussion that provides USEFUL INFORMATION doesn't go POOF like the last one we butted heads in.

Capiche?

Rick

Pat M.'s Comment
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I tried no shoes once in a car. Talk about being uncomfortable. I have been wearing boots for so long that I don't even change out of them.

Tractor Man's Comment
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That's why I always drive with my socks on... technically I'm not barefoot that way!

rofl-1.gif

Cwc's Comment
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I tried no shoes once in a car. Talk about being uncomfortable. I have been wearing boots for so long that I don't even change out of them.

After being on my feet for 12-16 hours a day standing on steel in steel toes I was generally ready to peel them off when I got home. Being in a truck and not on my feet they aren't noticeable really but I refuse to walk into a truckstop while it's 76° to take a shower or spend my 34 in them in the same weather.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Now - for the record - I drive my car barefoot or with flip flops. I pretty much never wear shoes for my IT gig.

I wear steel toed Timberline Pro low top sneakers 8521-90076-p.jpg

Or Bates Lightweight Tactical Boots (non-steel toe) bates-footwear-enforcer-ultra-lites-8-ta

when I ride my motorcycle or drive a truck. When I'm working on the Port - I'm required to wear the steel toes, by OSHA regs.

The Tac Boots are really lightweight - comfortable to wear all day. The soles on both are oil resistant - work type soles.

Shippers/receivers that require safety gear (vests, glasses, hardhat, etc.) would probably require steel toes.

Don't know that I'd want to wander the nasty fuel islands in flops - probably ruin a good pair pretty quick. I do love my flops.

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

I might have been a little grumpy last night. didn't mean to ruffle feathers: )

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Now - for the record - I drive my car barefoot or with flip flops. I pretty much never wear shoes for my IT gig.

I wear steel toed Timberline Pro low top sneakers 8521-90076-p.jpg

Or Bates Lightweight Tactical Boots (non-steel toe) bates-footwear-enforcer-ultra-lites-8-ta

when I ride my motorcycle or drive a truck. When I'm working on the Port - I'm required to wear the steel toes, by OSHA regs.

The Tac Boots are really lightweight - comfortable to wear all day. The soles on both are oil resistant - work type soles.

Shippers/receivers that require safety gear (vests, glasses, hardhat, etc.) would probably require steel toes.

Don't know that I'd want to wander the nasty fuel islands in flops - probably ruin a good pair pretty quick. I do love my flops.

Rick

After living on islands for years I'll never give up flip-flops but I do love the Timberland Pro Steel toes boots.

I never could wear low top safety shoes while working on ships so I looked pretty out of place while working other shore side jobs with my high top boots.

And yes Flight deck boots "those Bates" are comfortable and last forever.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bolt's Comment
member avatar

Once again the construction worker has a commemorative two. I understand that a driver will spend most of his or her day sitting behind the the steering wheel so what he or she wears is of no consequence from a safety standpoint. However, I do get loads to the job site all the time. The standard for dress on all jobsites is steel toed boots, jeans, and shirts with a 4" sleeve. High vis is also becomin all the rage. To often drivers show up in shorts and tennis shoes. Now most of the time a driver shows up and is only out of then truck long enough to unstrap the load, climb back in then tractor and while while I unload. It seems to me the drivers could put on acceptable clothing for the 30 or 40 minutes he or she is out of the truck unstrapping the load.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Mr M wrote:

I might have been a little grumpy last night. didn't mean to ruffle feathers: )

No sir...you clearly meant what you said last night and definitely intended to insult, ruffle feathers and elevate yourself above all of us. I read it all before Brett deleted your sh**.

Everytime you write one or two sentence, chest-pumping balony I will continue to call you on it and Brett will continue to delete it at his discretion. It's his site, his right.

If you don't like it then please either post good and meaningful information (which you are obviously capable of) or keep the promise you made last night and stop posting all together.

W. L. Cooper's Comment
member avatar

Glad I seen this I just got chewed out for driving barefoot because of an ingrown nail by my mentor. She said it's a dot violation and it's illegal, so I simply asked where did you hear that at. She said it's common knowledge for experienced drivers. 😑😑😑

Any how I read my state manual cover to cover and seen a lot of rules, but not a thing about driving barefoot being illegal. I usually wouldn't care about this because I never drive barefoot, but the one time I do because my big toe is throbbing. I get my head bitten off by an "experienced driver mentor". It's just the principle of it, and the fact that my mentor dosent know anything but hear say when it comes to rules and regs of this industry.

Im just venting a little here, thanks everyone. Btw I love this site it has been very helpful throughout my school and mentorship. Keep up the good work!!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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