Local Work

Topic 18001 | Page 1

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Matt 's Comment
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This post is not necessarily for me its just kinda a general response. I was just wondering what experience people had with local companies and what they think about it in general?

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

I love local money is good and I'm home everyday. Off on weekends

This post is not necessarily for me its just kinda a general response. I was just wondering what experience people had with local companies and what they think about it in general?

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Shiva where u work lol

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

Actually I wondered that to is it a mom and pop sort of company or a mega?

Shiva where u work lol

s

Fire Marshal Bill's Comment
member avatar

I like doing local. Home every night off weekends and holidays.

I actually don't really drive that much.

I run containers.

Mr. Smith's Comment
member avatar

I was just wondering what experience people had with local companies and what they think about it in general?

Experience with Trucks: I was born into a pipeline company. (Water, Sewer, Storm Drain) we had a couple roll offs for hauling our manhole shafts, pipe, shoring, plates and smaller equipment like backhoes.

We had a couple lowboys when I was really little we had an old kenworth and a Murray then when I was like 14 we bought an old Pete and a Cozad. Excavators Crains Water Trucks... hauled stuff like that on em.

Then I ended up going over the road at 33? I think Inwas 33. Never had my license till I went over the road. I drove for central refrigerated it was awesome.

Now I drive local a Transfer Truck (ten wheel dump truck with a trailer, the trailer box transfers into the truck after you dump off the truck.) for a sand and gravel outfit. We don't only haul sand and gravel though we have some good contracts that keep us busy. But most of our work is sand and gravel out of surface mines to construction sites in places like downtown L.A.

What I think about it (driving local) in general:

My left leg. I think about my left leg. A lot. My knee is starting to hurt. You have to watch your mirrors more than over the road. I like being home Every Night and playing with my kids.

Traffic: you have to get a CB and make the most of it. Observe people mostly everyone is on their phone.

Pitstops: you can't always find a place to stop (posted routes) but there's plenty of places to stop without having to wait 400 miles.

Politics: your always near the office your always talking to company employees and politics always finds you and you always get involved even if you don't want to be.

Social Life: if your married you will find new places to take the family or your wife on a date. Your exploration is paid for then you go back in your personal car.

Money: I don't know anyone (local runners) that made less than $50,000 last year even the rookiest of rookies.

Medical: if you have a doctors appointment you can go to someone in your network.

Vacation: you become an over the road driver for a couple weeks. Where as OTR drivers become local drivers on their vacations and home time. :)

Food: you don't have to worry about it.

Any more specific questions?

I tried to be general as possible. I may have answered you wrong.

P.S. I came back on here today to see how the over the road guys are doing... I'm missing it. The little bit I did.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

I work for JB HUNT Local Intermodal ( JBI) out of Chicago

Actually I wondered that to is it a mom and pop sort of company or a mega?

double-quotes-start.png

Shiva where u work lol

s

double-quotes-end.png

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

You pretty much covered everything. Again money is very good and it feels more like a regular job. I'm able to change my schedule to fit my needs. Doctors appointments, my sons band concert, parent teacher conferences. Eat healthier. Etc, etc

double-quotes-start.png

I was just wondering what experience people had with local companies and what they think about it in general?

double-quotes-end.png

Experience with Trucks: I was born into a pipeline company. (Water, Sewer, Storm Drain) we had a couple roll offs for hauling our manhole shafts, pipe, shoring, plates and smaller equipment like backhoes.

We had a couple lowboys when I was really little we had an old kenworth and a Murray then when I was like 14 we bought an old Pete and a Cozad. Excavators Crains Water Trucks... hauled stuff like that on em.

Then I ended up going over the road at 33? I think Inwas 33. Never had my license till I went over the road. I drove for central refrigerated it was awesome.

Now I drive local a Transfer Truck (ten wheel dump truck with a trailer, the trailer box transfers into the truck after you dump off the truck.) for a sand and gravel outfit. We don't only haul sand and gravel though we have some good contracts that keep us busy. But most of our work is sand and gravel out of surface mines to construction sites in places like downtown L.A.

What I think about it (driving local) in general:

My left leg. I think about my left leg. A lot. My knee is starting to hurt. You have to watch your mirrors more than over the road. I like being home Every Night and playing with my kids.

Traffic: you have to get a CB and make the most of it. Observe people mostly everyone is on their phone.

Pitstops: you can't always find a place to stop (posted routes) but there's plenty of places to stop without having to wait 400 miles.

Politics: your always near the office your always talking to company employees and politics always finds you and you always get involved even if you don't want to be.

Social Life: if your married you will find new places to take the family or your wife on a date. Your exploration is paid for then you go back in your personal car.

Money: I don't know anyone (local runners) that made less than $50,000 last year even the rookiest of rookies.

Medical: if you have a doctors appointment you can go to someone in your network.

Vacation: you become an over the road driver for a couple weeks. Where as OTR drivers become local drivers on their vacations and home time. :)

Food: you don't have to worry about it.

Any more specific questions?

I tried to be general as possible. I may have answered you wrong.

P.S. I came back on here today to see how the over the road guys are doing... I'm missing it. The little bit I did.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

Thank you that was the type of answer I was looking for. I keep seeing on this forum about the mega carriers. I'm not complaining by no means just wondering why if its by choice or necessity.

double-quotes-start.png

I was just wondering what experience people had with local companies and what they think about it in general?

double-quotes-end.png

Experience with Trucks: I was born into a pipeline company. (Water, Sewer, Storm Drain) we had a couple roll offs for hauling our manhole shafts, pipe, shoring, plates and smaller equipment like backhoes.

We had a couple lowboys when I was really little we had an old kenworth and a Murray then when I was like 14 we bought an old Pete and a Cozad. Excavators Crains Water Trucks... hauled stuff like that on em.

Then I ended up going over the road at 33? I think Inwas 33. Never had my license till I went over the road. I drove for central refrigerated it was awesome.

Now I drive local a Transfer Truck (ten wheel dump truck with a trailer, the trailer box transfers into the truck after you dump off the truck.) for a sand and gravel outfit. We don't only haul sand and gravel though we have some good contracts that keep us busy. But most of our work is sand and gravel out of surface mines to construction sites in places like downtown L.A.

What I think about it (driving local) in general:

My left leg. I think about my left leg. A lot. My knee is starting to hurt. You have to watch your mirrors more than over the road. I like being home Every Night and playing with my kids.

Traffic: you have to get a CB and make the most of it. Observe people mostly everyone is on their phone.

Pitstops: you can't always find a place to stop (posted routes) but there's plenty of places to stop without having to wait 400 miles.

Politics: your always near the office your always talking to company employees and politics always finds you and you always get involved even if you don't want to be.

Social Life: if your married you will find new places to take the family or your wife on a date. Your exploration is paid for then you go back in your personal car.

Money: I don't know anyone (local runners) that made less than $50,000 last year even the rookiest of rookies.

Medical: if you have a doctors appointment you can go to someone in your network.

Vacation: you become an over the road driver for a couple weeks. Where as OTR drivers become local drivers on their vacations and home time. :)

Food: you don't have to worry about it.

Any more specific questions?

I tried to be general as possible. I may have answered you wrong.

P.S. I came back on here today to see how the over the road guys are doing... I'm missing it. The little bit I did.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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