Mad At Myself

Topic 18465 | Page 1

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Gladhand's Comment
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This morning went to Compton to pick up a preloaded trailer. It was at a exporter/importer place so it was really tight. Full of shipping containers and dry vans.

Anyways get there and drop the trailer, go to get my paper work and no one is there to give it to me so I have to wait. Go in again and still no one will be there for another 3 hours. Another swift driver got his paper work, so I asked him and he told me there is a guy in there who has it, so I went back in and got it taken care of.

My clock is burning up and the traffic is starting so I get in a hurry to get out, pull my trailer out of the tight slot and pull up to the guard shack. Guard checks seal and let's me leave.

I made the big mistake of not pretripping my trailer or even checking the seal. Get to the receiver and there is no seal on the trailer... They went ahead and let me drop anyways, with one of their own seals.

Not sure if the guard waved me off even though I didn't have a seal, the seal was in the trailer and I needed to seal it myself, or somebody removed it when I was at the loves for a quick break, but I doubt it.

So I had to talk about it to my DM and let him know what happened. Really hope nothing is missing, cause I know I'll be blamed for it. Seems like every time I start doing good, I **** up again. Man I am mad at myself.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Sneaky Pete's Comment
member avatar

So you've been mad at yourself for at least the 20 min since you posted this and maybe a little longer. Long enough, give yourself a break. If it bothered you enough to post it here, then it made a strong enough impression so that you'll remember it and won't repeat the mistake. Reading your post, it seems apparent that you know what you did wrong. When I first started 6 yrs ago, patience, which I'm certain I was born without, was the hardest thing I had to learn and then put into practice. A lot of OTR is the hurry up and wait game. Too many things in OTR over which you have no control to let them get to you. Follow your routine and don't rush the things over which you DO have control. That will keep you safe, efficient, in compliance and save you time in the long run. Above all, don't beat yourself up over it. Experience is the best teacher and that comes with time. Look at your "mistakes" as opportunities to learn. Everyone, including veteran drivers, make mistakes or has an off day.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

's Comment
member avatar

Yeah... What he said!

You got this... Chalk it up to a learning experience and move forward. We learn from the past, plan for the future, but live in the present... Go live!!!

smile.gif

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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We all make mistakes. Learn from it. But u didn't hit anything ;). So yay.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

So you've been mad at yourself for at least the 20 min since you posted this and maybe a little longer. Long enough, give yourself a break. If it bothered you enough to post it here, then it made a strong enough impression so that you'll remember it and won't repeat the mistake. Reading your post, it seems apparent that you know what you did wrong. When I first started 6 yrs ago, patience, which I'm certain I was born without, was the hardest thing I had to learn and then put into practice. A lot of OTR is the hurry up and wait game. Too many things in OTR over which you have no control to let them get to you. Follow your routine and don't rush the things over which you DO have control. That will keep you safe, efficient, in compliance and save you time in the long run. Above all, don't beat yourself up over it. Experience is the best teacher and that comes with time. Look at your "mistakes" as opportunities to learn. Everyone, including veteran drivers, make mistakes or has an off day.

I don't know, Sneaky Pete... maybe The Best First Post Ever? Hope to hear more from you!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sneaky Pete's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Pete B. You will hear more. This is a good positive forum.

Pianoman's Comment
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Don't be mad at yourself... But come on man, it only takes like 2 minutes to do a quick trailer pretrip and get all the important stuff--tires, lights, tandems locked, brake pads, splash guards secure, doors shut/sealed properly, visual king pin check, air/electrical connections. It's not as good as doing a real air brake test, but if you push in the red knob before you do your walk around, you can listen for air leaks when you check your tires and brake pads.

It doesn't have to take 15 minutes, but you should at least walk around the trailer slowly to do a visual inspection and th-ump your tires so you know what you're pulling.

True story...one time I was also in a hurry at a shipper and just did my pretrip while the trailer was still in the door. It was a tight lot and I had to wait for the yard dog to come get it. I thought I checked just about everything but the lights, which I checked once I pulled it out. I was literally pulling out of the yard when this guy hollered at me. Apparently I had missed that one of my mudflaps was falling off--it was hanging by only one screw from the bracket. If I'd left like that, it could have fallen off and caused a wreck (not to mention the citation I would have gotten if I'd been caught in a weigh station).

There have been other things I've missed on pretrips, but that was probably the worst one. Pretrips are important buddy.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Pianoman wrote to Gladhand:

Don't be mad at yourself... But come on man, it only takes like 2 minutes to do a quick trailer pretrip and get all the important stuff--tires, lights, tandems locked, brake pads, splash guards secure, doors shut/sealed properly, visual king pin check, air/electrical connections. It's not as good as doing a real air brake test, but if you push in the red knob before you do your walk around, you can listen for air leaks when you check your tires and brake pads.

It doesn't have to take 15 minutes, but you should at least walk around the trailer slowly to do a visual inspection and th-ump your tires so you know what you're pulling.

Pianoman,...I am glad you called this for what it was. Needed to be said.

I read this a half a dozen times; shakes head. No mistake Gladhand, you made a bad decision and understood the risk of your omission. Rushed! You got off lucky. I think you know that and know better.

Correct me if I am wrong but isn't rushing the root cause of most incidents that you have experienced? You have (guessing) 80k or more miles under your belt. Not that much of a rookie anymore...

Slow down Man (and I don't mean road speed), stop rushing. We like you here,...in one piece.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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