Making Life Decisions Over Here!

Topic 18579 | Page 1

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Rod B.'s Comment
member avatar

Let me explain my dilemma. I am single father of a wonderful 7 year old boy and we live in Sarasota Florida. I have a decent job making 17 an hour but i get ZERO benefits and ZERO sick/pto time off (not a biggy but with a child can be challenging). Also im in the pressure washing buisness which is hot and cold at times so its hard to budget. Ive come to a point that i cannot afford to rent a apartment (in my area). I either make to much for low income or too less for whats around here.i would move if i could, but i have 50/50 custody of my son and mom has a high paying job at the hospital so she ain't moving anytime soon.so i got to thinking, Ive always loved driving, heck i currently tow a goosneck around daily without a problem and i figured why not look into driving trucks? My thoughts is that i understand i have to do OTR first but i have hopes to land a local job after a year or so of experience and hopefully be able to afford a place of my own and get some benefits. I understand the first year ill be gone most of it and i understand its a huge lifestyle change. Im really thinking about this to provide for my boy because he is all i got. My ex wife said she is willing to keep him for a year 100% of the time so i can persue this. My question is, should i give up the 17 hour job to go after a trucking career with hopes it will pay in the long run? Are my goals realistic?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Lunchbox's Comment
member avatar

Take it for what's it worth (only my own decision) but i am leaving a job that pays 18.56 an hour for Truck Driving. Chase your dreams and provide for that boy....the insurance alone is a big deal...and once you get established...he is going to totally LOVE riding with daddy on summer vacation.

Lunchbox's Comment
member avatar

Take it for what's it worth (only my own decision) but i am leaving a job that pays 18.56 an hour for Truck Driving. Chase your dreams and provide for that boy....the insurance alone is a big deal...and once you get established...he is going to totally LOVE riding with daddy on summer vacation.

But bear in mind, depending on the company, you will have ALOT less time with him in person. But, if you feel you can better provide for him and he's okay with it...GO FOR IT! You have to do what you feel is best for your family.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

If you're working 40hrs a week, you're making just under $36,000/year with no benefits (17 x 40hrs x 52weeks). How does that not provide enough to rent an apartment?

You can make that in your first year of truck driving and have benefits. However, you'll see your son A LOT LESS and if $36k isn't enough to pay for an apartment, you'll be no closer to that objective.

If your ex takes your son 100% of time while you start your driving career, when do you ever expect to get back to 50/50 custody? Even after a year OTR what kind of driving job do you expect will accommodate single parenting?

Have you looked into warehouse work (e.g. Forklift Operator)? Maybe for Publix, Winn Dixie, Coca Cola or a beer distributor?

Are there education funding opportunities that might get you into a trade or business program (hey, if she's gonna watch the kid for a while might as well consider all possibilities) that would put you into a career (maybe medical)?

I did the part-time Dad thing while in the military. I'm doing it again in trucking (with a 9year old little girl) and it sorta sucks, but I do what I gotta to provide for my family.

Mostly I think you have to decide what your objectives are and then take the actions that accomplish those.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rod B.'s Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the advice. Where i live cheapest you can get into is a one bedroom for around 1,100 a month and after the regular bills and uncle sam i come up short. Her and i have talked and i would get 50/50 back around whatever local job i get. I also have looked into going to school but with the payments i have to give her to provide for him it makes it impossible to go to school full time. Im not rulling anything out tho and you did make some great points.

If you're working 40hrs a week, you're making just under $36,000/year with no benefits (17 x 40hrs x 52weeks). How does that not provide enough to rent an apartment?

You can make that in your first year of truck driving and have benefits. However, you'll see your son A LOT LESS and if $36k isn't enough to pay for an apartment, you'll be no closer to that objective.

If your ex takes your son 100% of time while you start your driving career, when do you ever expect to get back to 50/50 custody? Even after a year OTR what kind of driving job do you expect will accommodate single parenting?

Have you looked into warehouse work (e.g. Forklift Operator)? Maybe for Publix, Winn Dixie, Coca Cola or a beer distributor?

Are there education funding opportunities that might get you into a trade or business program (hey, if she's gonna watch the kid for a while might as well consider all possibilities) that would put you into a career (maybe medical)?

I did the part-time Dad thing while in the military. I'm doing it again in trucking (with a 9year old little girl) and it sorta sucks, but I do what I gotta to provide for my family.

Mostly I think you have to decide what your objectives are and then take the actions that accomplish those.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rod B.'s Comment
member avatar

Haha, funny thing is i told him about it today and thats the first thing he said, "when can i ride in it!!!???" I totally understand that the next year i would see him very little but i would rely on technology to see him via facetime and give him a map so he can mark everyday where i am.

Take it for what's it worth (only my own decision) but i am leaving a job that pays 18.56 an hour for Truck Driving. Chase your dreams and provide for that boy....the insurance alone is a big deal...and once you get established...he is going to totally LOVE riding with daddy on summer vacation.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

If mom has the high paying job, maybe she should be paying you. We are in the 21st century, equal rights and all that. 😆

I get that cost of living there is high. I live in the Florida panhandle, redneck riviera.

I didn't know if unemployment office (I think called Agency for Workforce Innovation) might have some programs or suggestions, like adult education programs (free) through a local vocational or technical school.

Have you looked into companies in your area that have drivers? Like grocery chains, Frito-Lay, beer/beverage distributors? Maybe stop by and ask what they require and pay. A guy I went through CDL school with, went to Coca Cola straight out of school. Very physical work, but he's home every day and it pays well.

Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

From someone who has been that kid, whos dad was OTR all the time, or male figure was. I say do it. as long as when your home, your with him. and that you make sure you actually go home. when my dad came home I didn't care that he was gone for weeks at a time, all I cared about was spending time with him. You have to understand those days when your totally exhausted, and just beat for, driving for 4 weeks, you still have to give him 100% cuz your time is limited. try to make it so you can be home in time for some of his games, or events he is interested in. its not a big deal you miss some here or there, but don't miss them all.

Again this was my experience as the kid. you boy may be very different. I myself don't have kids, and I am heading into this industry to do OTR. however I do not plan on renting an apt until I stop doing ITR, when I have to shut down ill be a hotel guy, or stay in the truck. that's 1100 a month fo savings you would not have spend. so you can take your boy to go do something cool, when you do come home.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Rod, you might try going bass ackwards. Check out local companies first. (No, you're not looking for a job today, but in the next few months.) Ask what their requirements are for a new class-A driver.

There's always beverage companies (BTW, I'll never forget being invited into the Coors distributor's tap room once.) Also restaurant/C-store distributors like McLane. They'll probably tell you what they want to see when you do check back for a job. Also, many larger building supply places.

Rod B.'s Comment
member avatar

Man, i really appreciate that.

From someone who has been that kid, whos dad was OTR all the time, or male figure was. I say do it. as long as when your home, your with him. and that you make sure you actually go home. when my dad came home I didn't care that he was gone for weeks at a time, all I cared about was spending time with him. You have to understand those days when your totally exhausted, and just beat for, driving for 4 weeks, you still have to give him 100% cuz your time is limited. try to make it so you can be home in time for some of his games, or events he is interested in. its not a big deal you miss some here or there, but don't miss them all.

Again this was my experience as the kid. you boy may be very different. I myself don't have kids, and I am heading into this industry to do OTR. however I do not plan on renting an apt until I stop doing ITR, when I have to shut down ill be a hotel guy, or stay in the truck. that's 1100 a month fo savings you would not have spend. so you can take your boy to go do something cool, when you do come home.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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