60 Hour Local CDL School, Is That Enough?

Topic 19261 | Page 1

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Buttercup's Comment
member avatar

Website says 30 hours of in the seat training and 60 hours total. Is this enough to go on training with a company as a hired on student?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hello Michelle B, and welcome aboard!

Yes 160 hours of training is the standard that most companies are looking for. You won't spend near that much time actually behind the wheel, but your school time should be that long. It will involve classroom, driving, and observation time, (standing around waiting for your turn) There are a good number of schools in the Northeast that are shorter, but I do not recommend going that way.

Have you considered the Paid CDL Training Programs? They are an excellent way to get started in this career without having to lay out a lot of your hard earned cash, and many of our members here have gone that route. There is usually a commitment required on your part, but we strongly recommend folks sticking with their first driving job for one year anyway.

Prime has a unique training program where you will get a ton of actual on the job training while getting paid a minimum of 700 dollars a week. Their first four weeks or so are unpaid, but they will advance you a couple of hundred a week during that time if you need it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy 's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Hello Michelle B, and welcome aboard!

Yes 160 hours of training is the standard that most companies are looking for. You won't spend near that much time actually behind the wheel, but your school time should be that long. It will involve classroom, driving, and observation time, (standing around waiting for your turn) There are a good number of schools in the Northeast that are shorter, but I do not recommend going that way.

Have you considered the Paid CDL Training Programs? They are an excellent way to get started in this career without having to lay out a lot of your hard earned cash, and many of our members here have gone that route. There is usually a commitment required on your part, but we strongly recommend folks sticking with their first driving job for one year anyway.

Prime has a unique training program where you will get a ton of actual on the job training while getting paid a minimum of 700 dollars a week. Their first four weeks or so are unpaid, but they will advance you a couple of hundred a week during that time if you need it.

Yep I love prime ;)

The first week is on the SIMS and classroom stuff and after that you get on the road 24/7 usually for two to three weeks depending on your skills before you test out. The day you get your CDL you go on the payroll.

You only pay $155 for processing and permit when you get there. $200 per week is advanced which you pay back in $25 per week increments. If you do not need the advance then you don't have deductions.then you go on the road for 30,000 TEAM miles which takes like six to eight weeks while you get paid $700 gross per week.

You must sign a contract that says you will work for one year or will pay back the schooling. My contract was for $3200. I paid the $155, am still here and paid nothing else for schooling ever. Swift has a similar contract but the repayment obligations are different and I'm sure others can explain it.

Keep in mind, no matter how long you get trained, you will be nervous and not feel ready for your own truck.

Look for a company that suits your needs and feel free to ask us any questions about your choices. :)

Trucking Company Reviews

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

The school i went too, was 220 hours and 240 if you included the passenger endorsement. And those are not including 1 week of class rooms.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I believe the standard is 160 hours. Someone may correct me here shortly.

Buttercup's Comment
member avatar

Yikes, so likely not worth $4300 lol

I believe the standard is 160 hours. Someone may correct me here shortly.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Are you on unemployment or have any type of programs to help out with the cost of the class?

Buttercup's Comment
member avatar

No definitely not. Just looking for a career change.

Are you on unemployment or have any type of programs to help out with the cost of the class?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hello Michelle B, and welcome aboard!

Yes 160 hours of training is the standard that most companies are looking for. You won't spend near that much time actually behind the wheel, but your school time should be that long. It will involve classroom, driving, and observation time, (standing around waiting for your turn) There are a good number of schools in the Northeast that are shorter, but I do not recommend going that way.

Have you considered the Paid CDL Training Programs? They are an excellent way to get started in this career without having to lay out a lot of your hard earned cash, and many of our members here have gone that route. There is usually a commitment required on your part, but we strongly recommend folks sticking with their first driving job for one year anyway.

Prime has a unique training program where you will get a ton of actual on the job training while getting paid a minimum of 700 dollars a week. Their first four weeks or so are unpaid, but they will advance you a couple of hundred a week during that time if you need it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Buttercup's Comment
member avatar

Hi there, and thanks for the replies everyone. I am in the uppermost county of New York state (you know, where the prisoners escaped from...lol). I have looked at quite a few company sponsored programs, Prime being one, and Roehl being the other. And CRST, which has the highest number of ads locally looking for drivers. I actually Applied to Roehl and got a call Saturday but was moving horses from Watkins Glen this weekend so wasn't available for chatting. I would really, ideally, like to apply with a company that will eventually let me bring my dog. I am nervous about a 15 month commitment with no pro rating for training though. I am also wondering about how these companies get you home once you're out driving? Perhaps a naive question, but, if they are taking you by bus, plane or train to their facilities, and then you're in a truck...are you expected to get back home whatever way you can get for your time off? I'm not too worried about time off the first year but like most other people, I would like time to visit with family and friends now and then. I know I have more questions, but it's early yet and I haven't coffee'd for the day.

Hello Michelle B, and welcome aboard!

Yes 160 hours of training is the standard that most companies are looking for. You won't spend near that much time actually behind the wheel, but your school time should be that long. It will involve classroom, driving, and observation time, (standing around waiting for your turn) There are a good number of schools in the Northeast that are shorter, but I do not recommend going that way.

Have you considered the Paid CDL Training Programs? They are an excellent way to get started in this career without having to lay out a lot of your hard earned cash, and many of our members here have gone that route. There is usually a commitment required on your part, but we strongly recommend folks sticking with their first driving job for one year anyway.

Prime has a unique training program where you will get a ton of actual on the job training while getting paid a minimum of 700 dollars a week. Their first four weeks or so are unpaid, but they will advance you a couple of hundred a week during that time if you need it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy 's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Hello Michelle B, and welcome aboard!

Yes 160 hours of training is the standard that most companies are looking for. You won't spend near that much time actually behind the wheel, but your school time should be that long. It will involve classroom, driving, and observation time, (standing around waiting for your turn) There are a good number of schools in the Northeast that are shorter, but I do not recommend going that way.

Have you considered the Paid CDL Training Programs? They are an excellent way to get started in this career without having to lay out a lot of your hard earned cash, and many of our members here have gone that route. There is usually a commitment required on your part, but we strongly recommend folks sticking with their first driving job for one year anyway.

Prime has a unique training program where you will get a ton of actual on the job training while getting paid a minimum of 700 dollars a week. Their first four weeks or so are unpaid, but they will advance you a couple of hundred a week during that time if you need it.

Yep I love prime ;)

The first week is on the SIMS and classroom stuff and after that you get on the road 24/7 usually for two to three weeks depending on your skills before you test out. The day you get your CDL you go on the payroll.

You only pay $155 for processing and permit when you get there. $200 per week is advanced which you pay back in $25 per week increments. If you do not need the advance then you don't have deductions.then you go on the road for 30,000 TEAM miles which takes like six to eight weeks while you get paid $700 gross per week.

You must sign a contract that says you will work for one year or will pay back the schooling. My contract was for $3200. I paid the $155, am still here and paid nothing else for schooling ever. Swift has a similar contract but the repayment obligations are different and I'm sure others can explain it.

Keep in mind, no matter how long you get trained, you will be nervous and not feel ready for your own truck.

Look for a company that suits your needs and feel free to ask us any questions about your choices. :)

Trucking Company Reviews

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

As others stated if you do private school most (if not all) companies want 160+ hr certificate. Once you have your CDL and have finished orientation (officially an employee); your time with a trainer varies from company to company. Those who team train tend to have longer training. Those companies that run the truck as a solo truck tend to be shorter. Some of us ended up with very short training lengths. I did a private school (3 weeks), 1 week of orientation, 2 weeks with a trainer, 1 week testing out to upgrade to solo. My trainer actually tried to leave me at the terminal after 1 week. My poor trainer. He likes his beauty sleep and I don't sleep a lot, lol.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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