Hiring Area

Topic 19459 | Page 1

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Matt 's Comment
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So I'm looking at a couple different companies. One I'm interested said not hiring in your area. However I don't plan on this being my area after I start driving. They do hire in the region I plan to go. I am the type that would like to have a job before leaving one though. Any suggestions?

Errol V.'s Comment
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So I'm looking at a couple different companies. One I'm interested said not hiring in your area. However I don't plan on this being my area after I start driving. They do hire in the region I plan to go. I am the type that would like to have a job before leaving one though. Any suggestions?

Few companies do business on verbal promises and stated intentions. Your best bet is to move first, get a "local" driver license and those utility company bills, then you can say you really do live in the community of your choice.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

So I'm looking at a couple different companies. One I'm interested said not hiring in your area. However I don't plan on this being my area after I start driving. They do hire in the region I plan to go. I am the type that would like to have a job before leaving one though. Any suggestions?

I drive for Pride Transport based in SLC. I don't live in their hiring area, but they allow such drivers if willing to work at least five-six weeks out followed by 5-6 days home time, and they'll fly you home.

Seppo's Comment
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One mega wouldn't bring me on as a new driver. They told me it was because they don't ship through my city. Seemed kind of strange as they have a terminal in Salt Lake City and a facility near Portland, and I live in largest city on the interstate between the two, but whatever.

I told the recruiter that my residence there was basically just a mailing address, that I have no need to actually go there and was basically planning to live on the road. I was rudely told "everyone needs to go home at some point". I replied that they could dispatch me out of SLC and I could find my way back from there if need be with no problem. When that didn't work, I told the recruiter about my eventual plans to move to SLC or Denver, and was told in the same curt tone "well, set up residence in one of those cities and then get in touch with us".

After that interaction and how unpleasant the recruiter was to me, I decided not to bother with that company at all, no matter where I move to. Can you just find a different company? There are certainly plenty of them out there. If you don't plan on taking much home time you could let them know that too. Recruiters assume most drivers want to get home every two weeks. I've had opportunities that I was otherwise told weren't available to me open up once I make it known that I like to stay out for 2-3 months at a time and then take a week or so off.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Seppo wrote:

I told the recruiter that my residence there was basically just a mailing address, that I have no need to actually go there and was basically planning to live on the road. I was rudely told "everyone needs to go home at some point". I replied that they could dispatch me out of SLC and I could find my way back from there if need be with no problem. When that didn't work, I told the recruiter about my eventual plans to move to SLC or Denver, and was told in the same curt tone "well, set up residence in one of those cities and then get in touch with us".

After that interaction and how unpleasant the recruiter was to me, I decided not to bother with that company at all, no matter where I move to. Can you just find a different company? There are certainly plenty of them out there. If you don't plan on taking much home time you could let them know that too. Recruiters assume most drivers want to get home every two weeks. I've had opportunities that I was otherwise told weren't available to me open up once I make it known that I like to stay out for 2-3 months at a time and then take a week or so off.

The recruiter was unpleasant and rude? Granted, all I know is what you wrote, but it seems to me they answered your questions truthfully, didn't mislead you or make a promise they had no intention of keeping. They are also not going to start the hiring process on the promise/premise of a "move" that hasn't taken place yet. It's smart business and they did their job qualifying you as a candidate. The only problem here? You didn't get the answer you wanted and tried to negotiate. Why bash the recruiter for that?

What is important for anyone seeking employment in this field is your second paragraph, If you don't get the answers you want from one company, move on and keep looking. Lot's of opportunities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John L.'s Comment
member avatar

So, am I understanding this correctly? If you plan on moving to another state, it's better to move there first and then seek a truck driving job? I'm only asking because I have no reason to stay in NJ anymore and I've been considering moving elsewhere to start over. That, and I don't want to be here after November's election.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

So, am I understanding this correctly? If you plan on moving to another state, it's better to move there first and then seek a truck driving job? I'm only asking because I have no reason to stay in NJ anymore and I've been considering moving elsewhere to start over. That, and I don't want to be here after November's election.

Generally hiring is not a problem. The OP lived in an area his company didn't hire from. His question was, "If I promise to move, will you hire me?" (That will get a "No" answer)

If you get hired, you can move anywhere your company has business, probably without a problem.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

If you plan on moving to another state, it's better to move there first and then seek a truck driving job?

Yes, either that or get hired with a company that will hire you from your current area and also is hiring out of wherever you're planning to move to.

I lived in North Carolina when I first started driving, but planned to move to Colorado once I got my CDL. As others have noted, companies won't hire you based on what you plan to do. They want a current address, preferably one that matches your current drivers license.

There are other ways to do it, I suppose; for example, if you have family or friends in the state you plan to move to, you could use their address and do some things to establish residency there.

Truck driving is the last great way to live wherever you want. Most of my stuff is now in Iowa, but I still have a Colorado CDL and spend as much time there as I do at the address in Iowa. I'm considering getting South Dakota residency for tax purposes, but haven't done it just yet because I want to make sure that I'm still in my company's hiring area lol.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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