Checking In!

Topic 19660 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Butta's Comment
member avatar

Well a lot has happened since I've last been online I did get fired from western express but in hindsight I think that was a blessing in disguise! I found work driving for a smaller company called Urol express bit unorthodox and unorganized but I learned a lot and will forever be grateful to them for giving me a chance with that accident on my record since then I've bought my own truck and I'm anxious to be my own boss and run my own company I bought a 2011 freightliner from Schneider with 345,000 miles on it and leased on to a company for 88% of the load so like always I'm here for advice! Any thought?

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

What happened with western? Are you under contract with this new company?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Butta, four months ago you were a totally green rookie who wrecked his truck and got fired by a company known for their leniency on rookie accidents. Somewhere since then you worked a few months for a company I've never heard of that you described as unorthodox and unorganized.

Now you have bought your own truck and leased onto some un-named company for 88% of the load and you are asking us for any thoughts?

My thoughts are this...

Who in the world was willing to insure you, and do you have any idea what percentage of that 88% is going to vanish into paying that premium?

Also, I assume you are aware that freight rates vary wildly, while the costs of operating an older truck are continually rising. What I'm saying is that 88% of $2.25/mile is considerably different than 88% of $1.50/mile. As long as the company you are leased to can get you a load they are making money, it doesn't matter to them about the rate of the freight. They don't have the overhead of the truck on their shoulders, you do.

I think if you thought you were having a rough go of it prior to now, you are about to learn what it means to really be dancing to a new tune. I wish you the best, but don't think you have the slightest clue about what you just got yourself into.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I bought a 2011 freightliner from Schneider with 345,000 miles on it

Butta, does anything seem odd to you about those numbers?

You found a six year old class 8 truck from a major carrier's fleet with less than sixty thousand miles per year put on it? Something just doesn't sound right to me. I've put 410,000 miles on my 2014 Volvo.

Now maybe it wasn't an over the road truck, maybe it was doing port drayage work or something like that, but those trucks are usually beat to death after a few years. That mileage number just seems odd to me.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Have to agree with Old School on this one. I have a 2016 Freightliner and I just turned 400000 miles on it. Something isn't right. Did you by chance look at the maintenance records on this rig?

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

On BUTTA'S defense I might say this when it concerns the insurance: if he is leased to another company then all he needs is his bobtail insurance which could be as low as 700 dollars a year depending of if he wants physical damage or not. but we also have to talk about the contract he has with the company he is leased to because most of the drivers leased to a company have to pay for a portion of their liability insurance since that goes by the DOT authority...... so mr BUTTA give us a little bit more feedback

Butta, four months ago you were a totally green rookie who wrecked his truck and got fired by a company known for their leniency on rookie accidents. Somewhere since then you worked a few months for a company I've never heard of that you described as unorthodox and unorganized.

Now you have bought your own truck and leased onto some un-named company for 88% of the load and you are asking us for any thoughts?

My thoughts are this...

Who in the world was willing to insure you, and do you have any idea what percentage of that 88% is going to vanish into paying that premium?

Also, I assume you are aware that freight rates vary wildly, while the costs of operating an older truck are continually rising. What I'm saying is that 88% of $2.25/mile is considerably different than 88% of $1.50/mile. As long as the company you are leased to can get you a load they are making money, it doesn't matter to them about the rate of the freight. They don't have the overhead of the truck on their shoulders, you do.

I think if you thought you were having a rough go of it prior to now, you are about to learn what it means to really be dancing to a new tune. I wish you the best, but don't think you have the slightest clue about what you just got yourself into.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Butta's Comment
member avatar

Aw man y'all got my head spinning I made a mistake on mileage it's 436,000 miles on the truck maintenance records and all ok nothing major I only got bobtail insurance and even though I wrecked I beat my ticket in court I understand about how a company makes money I've had this goal in mind long before I got a cdl I'm just thirsty for knowledge and experience I feel I got a good head on my shoulders I've prepared for this and left myself a safety net I'm going in to this eyes wide open!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

88%?

Are you pulling for Traveloko?

I sincere hope it all works out for you.

Stay safe.

Redleg 69's Comment
member avatar

Butta I wish you the very best of luck but with that many miles I hope You build yourself up a NICE and big escrow account. 435k is a lot and probably sooner than later the truck will be nickel and dimeing you to death . Those pumpkin trucks have been through a LOT

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More