Not Looking Good For Me....

Topic 19709 | Page 2

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Tastebuds's Comment
member avatar

Don't feel bad at all. I recently finished TnT and I'm about to finish up my first solo hitch. Just yesterday I tried backing into a spot at our terminal 3 times before I gave up and went to another spot. Funny thing about it? I was BOBTAILING!

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Charles W. "Shaky"'s Comment
member avatar

Eric, Everyone here is looking out for you. Susan hit it right in the head because there was days I could have had the loading dock to myself and could not put it in straight to save my life and then there was times I would think there's no way to get it in that spot and I'd it with ease. One day when your backing, that wonderful light bulb will come on and you will realize what your trainer was talking about and you'll feel like the world was lifted off your shoulders. But no matter how much you back there will be those days where you wanna throw up ur hands. Just hang in there it will come to you.

Don't feel bad at all. I recently finished TnT and I'm about to finish up my first solo hitch. Just yesterday I tried backing into a spot at our terminal 3 times before I gave up and went to another spot. Funny thing about it? I was BOBTAILING!

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Phox's Comment
member avatar

I don't know how you're setting up for your driver side back but let me tell ya... my trainer (with Knight) was horrible at teaching me how to back, so much so terminal had to put me with a couple of their local drivers to teach me. One of them taught me really well and I'll share the knowledge with you in the best I can via words.

First off your setup will make all the difference. 2nd tandem location. yes it's usually easier with tandems fwd but not in spaces where it's tight because you gotta factor in that xtra 10 feet or so of trailer behind the tandems. however you need more space between rows with tandems back all the way. kind of a dbl edged sword.

As far as set up goes the way I do it is pull up about as close to spot i'm going for as I can, maybe 4-5 feet away from it, I dunno, never took a measuring tape. then I will go fwd about 2-3 trucks (width wise) then turn to a 45º angle to the right quickly and drive in that direction till I'm about 1 truck length / width) away or so from next row, then I turn back towards the left till the trailer is a 45º difference from truck. Now turn the wheel where it needs to be and start backing. What this does is sets you up for the back and has the trailer already about halfway turns the way you need it while keeping you away from the next row enough that you can get truck back under trailer. This is not always easy or possible and sometimes you have to reset up differently as some places (customers, truck stops) have really tight backing spaces or other things to make it more difficult. Always remember to get out and look if you're not sure that the rear end of trailer isn't going to hit anything.

Tandem location is important too. that is the point of the trailer that is physically turning. If you have lot of space between rows, tandems all the way back is easiest (to me) but if not tandems fwd is but with fwd you have to be wary of that xtra 10 feet of trailer after the tandems. This is one of those things you'll figure out in due time on your own. I for one don't adjust mine once I have them legal and balanced unless I have to.

One of these days I'll make a video showing what I explained. but for now maybe this will help.

Another thing... even I after 1.5 years of driving still have bad days. I have had times where I should have made it into a spot in 1 try and it took me 25-30 minutes with 60 pull ups (not really but you get the point) and other days like last night where I backed between 2 trailers, in the dark, tired in 1 try, perfectly centered with 0 pull ups except to slide tandems back per consignee requirments but that was after I was already done backing.

As far as the centering issues, worry about getting in the spot first, then pull fwd, to the left, then right and straight again to angle the trailer to move to the right and other way around to make it go to the left (gosh I hope I said the turn directions in the right order haha). getting in the hole is the important and difficult part, being perfectly centered on first try... not always gonna happen but that's how you get setup for centering once you are in.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Garth M.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm struggling backing myself but lately with the help of my instructor I'm working on not over steering. My biggest problem is the location of the trailer tandems before turning the wheel right to begin the exercise but as long as I don't over steer I am able to correct easier. I'm on my second driving instructor thank goodness, the first did a poor job of explaining what to look at to keep the trailer straight he had me looking at the tractor tandems and didn't explain about looking in the mirrors to keep the trailer sides you see equal and turning the wheel towards the side that was bigger to straighten. I hope that doesn't confuse you. I saw a good video but I don't have it handy, the driver made it very simple by not getting into a blind side situation in the first place, fight the temptation to over correct.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

I have fir the most part tried to be positive through this whole training experience. However these last few days I'm riding an all time low. My TNT phase is almost over as far as miles are concerned. My trainers attitude has been better. All things considering I should be elated to start this new adventure. However I have yet to figure out or impress my trainer enough with my backing maneuvers. I'm starting to think my training will continue, and financially I don't think I can continue if that's the case. I am spread pretty thin and bringing home just $1600 a month is not something I can do for very much longer.

The backing problems I have all start with the set up. If I get a good set up which is rare, I usually guide it too far to the blindside. To date this has been ok since all my backs have been empty on my blindside.

I honestly just don't know if I will get this. My trainer has done all he can do. But my brain does not get what he is saying. I have yet to hit anything, and I do eventually make it into the hole, but like I said I'm either not straight, not centered, not aimed right, there is always something I have done wrong. I just can't get it right.

Do as many pull ups as necessary

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Don't feel bad at all. I recently finished TnT and I'm about to finish up my first solo hitch. Just yesterday I tried backing into a spot at our terminal 3 times before I gave up and went to another spot. Funny thing about it? I was BOBTAILING!

Now that's funny!

(I'm laughing WITH you, not AT you)

rofl-3.gif

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Tastebuds's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Don't feel bad at all. I recently finished TnT and I'm about to finish up my first solo hitch. Just yesterday I tried backing into a spot at our terminal 3 times before I gave up and went to another spot. Funny thing about it? I was BOBTAILING!

double-quotes-end.png

Now that's funny!

(I'm laughing WITH you, not AT you)

rofl-3.gif

Who said I was laughing??!! LMAO In all seriousness, if I couldn't laugh at myself out here, I'd never get to laugh.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Haze Gray 's Comment
member avatar

The fact that you are concerned about your performance shows your desire to be a professional. Our industry needs more of you. Too many new drivers out there could care less if they do the job safe and professionally.

Keep calm and stay focused on the professionalism and safety and you'll be a pro in no time.

Don't let the old dogs fool you, I've seen (and been) many experienced drivers look like they're backing a bull into a China shop. 😁

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

As long as you don't hit anything and you're in between the lines, straight or not, it doesn't matter how long it takes. You don't get extra points for style, finesse, or speed in this business, so just breathe and take your time. Believe in yourself and you'd be surprised at what you can accomplish.

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