On Ramp Etiquette

Topic 19842 | Page 1

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MC1371's Comment
member avatar

This goes to Brett's post on courtesy.

So assuming your left side is blocked, or many fast movers coming up.

Other rigs, pretty easy. Heavy and slow I'll go by, light and quick I'll slow and let in.

The question is 4wheelers. When am I being a jerk or not.

If you pace me coming down the on ramp no, I'm not going to back out of it. At best I'm doing 62, you can accelerate up to posted speed, or wait 5 seconds and go around.

Am I becoming one of those guys?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Safety should always be your guide in a situation like this. Always, no exceptions.

Part of our job is to stay out of trouble or in the case you described, remove ourselves from the troublesome situation. You must always assume the driver trying to enter the interstate has no clue, you must drive for yourself and to some extent for them. Imagine the worst possible move the car could make in a situation like that; not yielding to you and forcing there way in, causing an accident that might involve you. Let 'em on...drop your speed to 58-60. Not about being a jerk...it's about reducing the risk of an accident.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

This goes to Brett's post on courtesy.

So assuming your left side is blocked, or many fast movers coming up.

Other rigs, pretty easy. Heavy and slow I'll go by, light and quick I'll slow and let in.

The question is 4wheelers. When am I being a jerk or not.

If you pace me coming down the on ramp no, I'm not going to back out of it. At best I'm doing 62, you can accelerate up to posted speed, or wait 5 seconds and go around.

Am I becoming one of those guys?

I hate entrance ramps when 4 wheeler don't know how to merge properly... If anything, I react depending on their position to my trailer. If they're about halfway, I maintain my speed. If they're close enough to the front and there's room behind me, I'll slow down. A-B entrance/exits are the hardest though. A enters in the same lane as B exits. Those are accidents waiting to happen.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Completely agree with G-Town.

This isn't about courtesy or etiquette. Yes, they are supposed to merge properly, but you are the one responsible for being safe. Keep it safe and you will always come out better.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Safety should always be your guide in a situation like this. Always, no exceptions.

Part of our job is to stay out of trouble or in the case you described, remove ourselves from the troublesome situation. You must always assume the driver trying to enter the interstate has no clue, you must drive for yourself and to some extent for them. Imagine the worst possible move the car could make in a situation like that; not yielding to you and forcing there way in, causing an accident that might involve you. Let 'em on...drop your speed to 58-60. Not about being a jerk...it's about reducing the risk of an accident.

I'm with you, and hard to type out all scenarios. I was thinking more of unholys example.

Plus take in weight etc. Not talking nose to nose, drag. I'll give them that. More the ones that are pacing my trailer and just hang there expecting either a turbo boost or hard brake to get out of their way.

I swear some states train drivers that the drivers on the freeway, expressway will adjust to them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I am still learning to look far enough ahead and move over early for a busy on ramp. Like I said, stiill learning. I sometimes have to adjust my speed to let them in.

Sambo's Comment
member avatar

I get frustrated by this scenario as well. 99% of the time I just tap my brakes and let them merge.

The problem with driving a governed truck is that if you merge into the second lane, you'll be impeding the faster traffic, and this usually brings many colorful metaphors and nice comments about your company, over the cb.

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

The problem with driving a governed truck is that if you merge into the second lane, you'll be impeding the faster traffic, and this usually brings many colorful metaphors and nice comments about your company, over the cb.

That's when you turn off the CB. Perhaps I'm "that guy", but in major metropolitan areas I'm taking the middle lane. If someone wants to deal with the merging traffic, let them have it. They can pass me on the right or left if they are in that much of a hurry. I feel it's the safer place to be, so you're minimizing the interaction with "stupid 4 wheelers." These are the same people who will drive a dark colored vehicle in a thunderstorm and not even know to turn on their lights.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Gentlemen there is only one correct answer here...

...we must be the one operating with SAFETY in mind at all times. Common sense and better judgment should be the guide. If there is one, I'm cool with running the middle lane,...but the risk for being jumped and cutoff increases dramatically.

Peace.

Sambo's Comment
member avatar

I try to be accommodating while in those situations, but, in cities where there are a lot of on ramps, in probably going to be in lane 2 more often than lane 1. There are more interactions when in the merging lane, which are more opportunities for something to go wrong. Also, it kills your fuel economy if you are having to speed up and slow down constantly.

The problem is that most cities now have the "no trucks in left lanes" rule. That needs to go away. Here is, in my opinion, how it should work. On a 4 lane through a city, left lane should be for fast through traffic, maybe put a minimum speed of 68mph. Lane 3 should be for slower through traffic, minimum speed 60mph. Lane 2 for local travel, maximum speed 60 mph, and lane 1 for traffic merging on and off the freeway.

Not sure if that would work but seems like it would make traffic flow more easily, or some variant of this approach.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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