Screwed Up Big Time, Think I'm Done (reefer Temp Wrong)

Topic 19920 | Page 1

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Werner N.'s Comment
member avatar

Looked at the bill of lading and saw protect from heat and cold with no temp listed. When scanning in paper work I noticed they had said to set temp to 36 at the bottom.

The receiver put minus marks next to all the items on bol and signed it, they also took all the freight.

So did no one notice ? Did Jesus bless me this once? Or do the minus marks mean refused/damaged.

I assume the minus marks mean refused/damaged and sent actually check marks.

Should I snitch on myself and call my manager ? Should I hang tight and hope for the best?

David's Comment
member avatar

Looked at the bill of lading and saw protect from heat and cold with no temp listed. When scanning in paper work I noticed they had said to set temp to 36 at the bottom.

The receiver put minus marks next to all the items on bol and signed it, they also took all the freight.

So did no one notice ? Did Jesus bless me this once? Or do the minus marks mean refused/damaged.

I assume the minus marks mean refused/damaged and sent actually check marks.

Should I snitch on myself and call my manager ? Should I hang tight and hope for the best?

The question is, was it refer ever on? Was it atleast in the low 40s? Generally if a load is temp controlled, the receiver will tell you if it's bad, at least that's been my experience in the 10 refer loads I ever hauled.

You saidn36 degrees so it's not frozen just has to be refrigerated... safe temp with food is 35-43 refrigerated. Anything above that and bacteria can start growing..

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Werner N.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Looked at the bill of lading and saw protect from heat and cold with no temp listed. When scanning in paper work I noticed they had said to set temp to 36 at the bottom.

The receiver put minus marks next to all the items on bol and signed it, they also took all the freight.

So did no one notice ? Did Jesus bless me this once? Or do the minus marks mean refused/damaged.

I assume the minus marks mean refused/damaged and sent actually check marks.

Should I snitch on myself and call my manager ? Should I hang tight and hope for the best?

double-quotes-end.png

The question is, was it refer ever on? Was it atleast in the low 40s? Generally if a load is temp controlled, the receiver will tell you if it's bad, at least that's been my experience in the 10 refer loads I ever hauled.

You saidn36 degrees so it's not frozen just has to be refrigerated... safe temp with food is 35-43 refrigerated. Anything above that and bacteria can start growing..

Load was supposed to be set to 36, I set it to 70. So it set was on and running at 70.

I didn't fully read the bol and notice the required temp at the bottom, thought I was just supposed to protect from heat and cold, plus dispatch usually sends macros of temp is wrong.

The question I have is are they check marks or minus sign on the paper work, and how long does the receiver have to file a claim? It was draught and draft beer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok, Werner. If I could I would hit you in the head with a soft baseball bat. But I can't, so I'm just going to yell at you instead.

Usually, not always, when they put a mark next to the product on the BoL they're making a note that the product is there. So if I'm looking over a load and I see 40 boxes of cereal product #12345 I will put a mark next to it so I know I counted it.

I probably wouldn't say anything and if they confronted me I would just play stupid. But I think you'll get away with this one only because its Beer. They only want it temperature controlled so that the beer wont be 100 degrees. They dont need it ice cold, though they prefer it.

Pray that the receiver is lazy and the dock workers dont care about their job to notice. But I would bet you'll be fine. Just try to keep it to yourself and dont give them a reason to lool at you.

Now as for the yelling part. You really, really cannot let this happen again. If you're not 110% sure about the reefer temp then do not leave the shipper until you get that required temperature with a signature of the shipping clerk. Always read everything. Must not let this happen ever again. Seriously, if this was anything but beer you would be a goner.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ok, Werner. If I could I would hit you in the head with a soft baseball bat. But I can't, so I'm just going to yell at you instead.

Usually, not always, when they put a mark next to the product on the BoL they're making a note that the product is there. So if I'm looking over a load and I see 40 boxes of cereal product #12345 I will put a mark next to it so I know I counted it.

I probably wouldn't say anything and if they confronted me I would just play stupid. But I think you'll get away with this one only because its Beer. They only want it temperature controlled so that the beer wont be 100 degrees. They dont need it ice cold, though they prefer it.

Pray that the receiver is lazy and the dock workers dont care about their job to notice. But I would bet you'll be fine. Just try to keep it to yourself and dont give them a reason to lool at you.

Now as for the yelling part. You really, really cannot let this happen again. If you're not 110% sure about the reefer temp then do not leave the shipper until you get that required temperature with a signature of the shipping clerk. Always read everything. Must not let this happen ever again. Seriously, if this was anything but beer you would be a goner.

Agree with Daniel 100%. Read everything, front and back. If you are running reefer, 99% of the time you will be put-on a load requiring a controlled temperature.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

Werner if the receiver took the product then they were ok with it. If they did not want it ? it would have never left your trailer.... I see those claims all day long

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

I'll put in my 2 cents only because i haul beer a lot: i don't pull reefers but the loads occasionally include kegs, i think because they start out cold and are good for a couple days even without refrigeration. Also, I've been told the receiver is required to accept everything even if they're claiming damage. I think it's because otherwise it would be very difficult to dispose of it. They load the returns in a trailer along with pallets and empty kegs and it goes back to the brewery. But I suppose if they were rejecting an entire load maybe they just wouldn't unload it at all. Of course this is the agreement our company has with the shipper/receiver, I don't know if it would be the same for you. However, the one time my load contained some damage they had me sign a form and I had to report it to my company's claims dept, so if they didn't say anything to you I would think you're probably OK, as others said above.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Werner N.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah it was my bad but I've gotten loads with no temp and bills just say protect from heat and cold, then it turns into a 4 hour wait well the company verifies this is true.

Well looks like I learned an important lesson

double-quotes-start.png

Ok, Werner. If I could I would hit you in the head with a soft baseball bat. But I can't, so I'm just going to yell at you instead.

Usually, not always, when they put a mark next to the product on the BoL they're making a note that the product is there. So if I'm looking over a load and I see 40 boxes of cereal product #12345 I will put a mark next to it so I know I counted it.

I probably wouldn't say anything and if they confronted me I would just play stupid. But I think you'll get away with this one only because its Beer. They only want it temperature controlled so that the beer wont be 100 degrees. They dont need it ice cold, though they prefer it.

Pray that the receiver is lazy and the dock workers dont care about their job to notice. But I would bet you'll be fine. Just try to keep it to yourself and dont give them a reason to lool at you.

Now as for the yelling part. You really, really cannot let this happen again. If you're not 110% sure about the reefer temp then do not leave the shipper until you get that required temperature with a signature of the shipping clerk. Always read everything. Must not let this happen ever again. Seriously, if this was anything but beer you would be a goner.

double-quotes-end.png

Agree with Daniel 100%. Read everything, front and back. If you are running reefer, 99% of the time you will be put-on a load requiring a controlled temperature.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

Well in a lot of the cargo claims I have seen ,the receiver does not take possession if they believe there was a problem because now the shipper can turn around and say they did not store it properly

I'll put in my 2 cents only because i haul beer a lot: i don't pull reefers but the loads occasionally include kegs, i think because they start out cold and are good for a couple days even without refrigeration. Also, I've been told the receiver is required to accept everything even if they're claiming damage. I think it's because otherwise it would be very difficult to dispose of it. They load the returns in a trailer along with pallets and empty kegs and it goes back to the brewery. But I suppose if they were rejecting an entire load maybe they just wouldn't unload it at all. Of course this is the agreement our company has with the shipper/receiver, I don't know if it would be the same for you. However, the one time my load contained some damage they had me sign a form and I had to report it to my company's claims dept, so if they didn't say anything to you I would think you're probably OK, as others said above.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

Well in a lot of the cargo claims I have seen ,the receiver does not take possession if they believe there was a problem because now the shipper can turn around and say they did not store it properly

Yeah, I really only have experience with this one place, and like I said, no reefer experience.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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