So I Failed At Flatbed (not Really)

Topic 19996 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Vendingdude's Comment
member avatar

"Of all the things involved in flatbedding, tarping will be the thing to eventually chase me out. To me it has the highest risk for the lowest pay. But I'll admit when I finish a particularly hard tarp job I'm kinda proud. Yeah I know, who notices?

Well, another flatbedder would notice I guess. But i digress..."

Well, Turtle, I've never tarped a flatbed load, but i know how dangerous, dirty and taxing it is. I notice a neat tight job, especially on an awkwardly shaped load, and mentally tip my hat to the driver. And then remind myself I'm glad it was him not me. I'll just as easily spot a haphazard flapping-in-the-breeze ruin-the-tarp job as well. More people are noticing if the flatbedder takes pride in his work, or was in a hurry or is just sloppy than you probably think.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Cold War Surplus's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

To ALL new drivers out there: ^^^THIS^^^ is how you change jobs. If you decide what you are doing or the division you are in isn't really for you, find what you want/need then change divisions WITHIN YOUR COMPANY, that way you can give a division a TRIAL RUN and if you find its not for you, then you can move to another division within your company, that way you don't look like a job hopper and you still have a lot of opportunities.

double-quotes-end.png

While I agree that he handled it well, company policies vary on letting drivers switch divisions. For example, if you wanted to try flatbed (CRST's Malone division) it wouldn't be as simple as talking to your FM and making the switch. You would have to quit CRST for 6 months then reapply as an external applicant to the Malone division.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
if you wanted to try flatbed (CRST's Malone division) it wouldn't be as simple as talking to your FM and making the switch. You would have to quit CRST for 6 months then reapply as an external applicant to the Malone division.

That's an incredibly rare exception. Most companies are delighted to let a proven driver change divisions. Whatever keeps drivers around and makes them happy.

That setup at CRST sounds like some sort of a anti-poaching agreement after a buyout or something. Whatever their structure is, it's certainly not the normal setup you'll find at most major carriers.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Well not really. Anyway after almost 9 months of doing flatbed at Prime I have decided flatbed is not for me. The good thing about Prime is the many different divisions we have so I can still stay with them. I really love Prime and enjoy working here. I plan to finish my year up here in October and still have no plans of looking at other companies. I talked to my FM and told him my feelings and that I wanted to make the switch to the tanker division. So last week he brought me into Springfield and I went through our tanker bootcamp we have here. It was a lot of information and we had a test at the end. We did a written test as well as pump on and pump off product on our own. I passed both so did not have to do any additional time with a trainer since i have over 6 months solo here. I just completed my first tanker load delivering some Palm Oil to Chicago today.

Tanker is very different. To begin with the surge is very real. I always heard about it and just thought it wasn't too bad. No its very bad but as I get better and more used to shifting with the surge and just overall driving smoother and controlling my stops and starts that part will get much better. I enjoy the physical part of tanker also as far and pumping and being out of the truck doing physical activity. I also enjoyed flatbed but it was way more work than I ever anticipated it to be. Plus the constant worrying over my load securement didn't make it much better. My hats off to the flatbedders on here you have my upmost respect. I gave it my all for almost 9 months but I feel like our tanker division is a much better fit for me in the end.

Again Prime has been good to me and giving me so many opportunity's to learn so many new things I will forever be grateful to them. This is why I worked with them to still stay here with them just do a different division.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

To ALL new drivers out there: ^^^THIS^^^ is how you change jobs. If you decide what you are doing or the division you are in isn't really for you, find what you want/need then change divisions WITHIN YOUR COMPANY, that way you can give a division a TRIAL RUN and if you find its not for you, then you can move to another division within your company, that way you don't look like a job hopper and you still have a lot of opportunities.

Icecold24k, Sir, my friend, you did NOT fail. YOU STUCK with it for 9 mos before deciding it wasn't for you and you moved within your company. You sir handled this the way we always encourage people to do here at TruckingTruth. Kudos to you and you have my utmost respect for sticking with it as long as you did. Some drivers don't even make it a month in flatbed. You did it for 9 mos. Its NOT an easy job. Thanks for your service on here.

smile.gifthank-you.gifthank-you-2.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Thank you so much for the kind words and the encouragement. I am happy to stay with Prime. They took a chance on me to get me my CDL and hire me and I owe them for that I refuse to back out of my obligation to them especially how accommodating and good they have been to me.

You are so welcome. EVERY DAY you are out there sir turnin those miles, you truly are a blessin to this industry. I just wish I had that level of determination when I was driving before.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Everything Brett said here is so on point! Trucking is demanding. It's easy for an entry level driver to confuse the demanding realities of the career and let those demands make them think they've chosen the wrong company or type of freight to pull. To do this right, and make some decent money, takes considerable commitment, more than most newbies realize.

Yes i do agree it is demanding and takes a lot of commitment especially the first year. It can be very tough. I feel I am truly committed to what I am doing. I have done well at prime in the 9 months I have been here. I just made the decision and realized that I simply was not cut out for flatbed. I just do not want to perform that level of physical activity on a daily basis and decided to switch to our tanker division and try it out because I am committed to Prime and enjoy working here.

Good luck in the tanker division at Prime... I notice your trucks on the road.

Thanks a lot for that!!!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'm sure you'll do real well man. I completely understand where you're coming from. Flatbedders are crazy, that's why they're flatbedders!

Tanker has some of the physical aspect to it, and I'm assuming you were drawn by the physical aspect of flatbedding in the first place. Hopefully you will find just the right mix of being slammed around by your freight, dragging hoses around, and climbing ladders repeated times just to make sure you've vented your tank, to give you a more desirable experience with your career.

Best of luck to ya! Man, we hate to lose these good flatbedders to tanker jobs.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm sure you'll do real well man. I completely understand where you're coming from. Flatbedders are crazy, that's why they're flatbedders!

Tanker has some of the physical aspect to it, and I'm assuming you were drawn by the physical aspect of flatbedding in the first place. Hopefully you will find just the right mix of being slammed around by your freight, dragging hoses around, and climbing ladders repeated times just to make sure you've vented your tank, to give you a more desirable experience with your career.

Best of luck to ya! Man, we hate to lose these good flatbedders to tanker jobs.

I'm sure if I make another 'Adventures of Daniel B.- Tanker Edition' we tanker yankers may be able to take more flatbedders away from you!

dancing-dog.gifsmile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

I'm sure you'll do real well man. I completely understand where you're coming from. Flatbedders are crazy, that's why they're flatbedders!

Tanker has some of the physical aspect to it, and I'm assuming you were drawn by the physical aspect of flatbedding in the first place. Hopefully you will find just the right mix of being slammed around by your freight, dragging hoses around, and climbing ladders repeated times just to make sure you've vented your tank, to give you a more desirable experience with your career.

Best of luck to ya! Man, we hate to lose these good flatbedders to tanker jobs.

Thanks! Yes for sure my hats off to flatbedders. You guys have my upmost respect.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm sure if I make another 'Adventures of Daniel B.- Tanker Edition' we tanker yankers may be able to take more flatbedders away from you!

dancing-dog.gifsmile.gif

rofl-2.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-2.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Prime Inc Advice For New Truck Drivers Becoming A Truck Driver Flatbed
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More