Waiting On An Express Code

Topic 20065 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

The only times I've had to wait more than 5 minutes for an express code, either my QC wasn't connecting to the satellite, or the computers on the other side we're having issues sending messages. If I've been waiting more than 15-20 minutes, I usually call and see what's up. If necessary, they should be able to read the number off to you over the phone.

Patricia R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the responses. Brett u are absolutely right about the weekend crew. I looked back at my dates on the calendar and every time I've had to wait it was because I had to wait on after hours or weekend crew :)

So I guess I need to start asking when I check in if there will be any extra fees so I can start the process as soon as possible during those times I'm stuck with the skeleton crew so I can save myself some frustration. I don't know why I didn't catch on to that pattern before now.

I love this sight. Everyone is so helpful! Having a sight like this definitely helps me as a newer driver make better choices in how to deal with frustrating situations. Its hard starting off in a new career with very little training and support from the company you work for. That's not a comment against my company. It's just the nature Of this business because we are out here pretty much alone managing ourselves and our time.

Thanks guys :)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Its hard starting off in a new career with very little training and support from the company you work for. That's not a comment against my company. Its just the nature Of this business because we are out here pretty much alone managing ourselves and our time.

That's a great insight Patricia! When we talk about some drivers being "Top Tier" drivers, part of what we're referring to is how they learn how things work at their particular company. Once you've got a grip on that, you can start to manage ways of dealing with situations like you're experiencing on the weekends and maybe get proactive so that you and your regular dispatcher can have those things already settled by Fruday afternoon.

There is a lot to being successful at this, and much of it depends on the driver knowing how to take actions that change the dynamics that usually slow everyone else down.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Its hard starting off in a new career with very little training and support from the company you work for. That's not a comment against my company. It's just the nature Of this business because we are out here pretty much alone managing ourselves and our time.

That's dead on, and in fact that's exactly why I started this website 10 1/2 years ago. At the time, no one out there was teaching anyone how this industry works or how to be successful as a driver. Every website I found was nothing more than a sounding board for everyone to gripe about how horrible their company is.

It's also one of the big reasons we tell people to stick with their first company for one full year. It takes a long time to prove yourself to be a safe and reliable driver and to learn how things are done in this industry. You also have to get to know a few of the right people in the offices that have the authority to pull some strings once in a while when you need it.

Unfortunately none of that is going to happen until you first learn how to handle that rig, manage your time, and adjust to life on the road, all of which takes time. It's not something anyone is going to accomplish in a few short months.

Keep coming back here anytime you're facing situations like the ones you've been presenting to us and we're always happy to help you understand them and work through em. Whether you stick with your company after that one year mark isn't what's important. The lessons you're learning now are going to help you at every company you work for throughout your career.

Keep at it! Keep performing at the highest level and keep prodding dispatch to put great miles on you. When you're running hard, you're easy to get along with, you're safe, and you're making all of your appointments on time they're going to want to keep you as busy as possible. Just remember that dispatch is insanely busy too. Sometimes things slip through the cracks. You have to keep reminding them about what's going on.

"Hey, you've given me three short runs in a row. How about something with some miles on it?"

"Hey, this week has been really slow. I'm gonna be in a homeless shelter if you don't find something big for me soon."

That kind of stuff. You have to be your own salesperson. Keep after them. Keep asking for more work. They want you to perform your job at the highest level, and when you're doing exactly that you can expect the same in return. If you're a Top Tier driver, you expect Top Tier miles and treatment. Obviously the freight can be finicky. Load planners and dispatchers aren't magicians. Things won't always go smoothly. But if you keep performing and you keep expecting them to reward you with great miles and a little extra attention once in a while you'll get exactly that in the long run.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
A D's Comment
member avatar

So much invaluable information all over the place. This site is something else. The gift that keeps on giving. Soon I will be in training, hope to give back as much as I got.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks to all I've learned here, I diss almost all these little problems with, "That's Trucking". It saves me a ton of frustration. I don't have People Net (our elogs and communication) in my truck yet, all my clothes, atlas and other stuff for the truck are in storage in Joplin. I have one pair of pants and two sets of everything else. I have been flying by the seat of my pants this first solo week. I hope to be in Joplin by tomorrow night. I have to call dispatch with my every move. How about 20 minutes on hold for an arrival call. With People Net, it's hit the yes button and your arrival call is done. Glad you're doing better Patricia. Good luck.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More