Non Reportable Accident

Topic 20242 | Page 1

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Deplorable Numero Uno's Comment
member avatar

Hello,

I'm a rookie driver with CR England. I touched trailers in a parking lot a couple weeks ago. There was minimal of damage. No injuries. No citations. A police report was filed as a non reportable accident. I've been driving about three months now and am looking forward to leaving CRE as soon as my contract expires in December.

I have a stupid question: If it's "non reportable" when I apply to another company they won't be able to see it on my driving record and therefore I could omit it from my application, right?

I'll probably disclose it anyway. I'm ashamed to even ask this question. But I'll really hate it if a less than $500 accident will ruin my chances with other companies.

Thank you for your attention, Deplorable Numero Uno

Old School's Comment
member avatar

It will probably appear on your DAC report from C.R. England. This shouldn't hurt you at all if you complete your contract with C. R. England, in fact I recommend you try to hang in there for one full year.

You definitely should report this when applying for jobs. It's a minor issue, and if you explain what happened just about anyone will be willing to overlook it as a "rookie" mistake.

If you can keep that first trucking job for a full year, you will only be helping yourself. There is so much to learn out here on the road, and you'll be much better prepared to move on if you stick it out and endure the "School of Hard Knocks." You may even discover that C. R. England isn't as bad as some have claimed.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Deplorable Numero Uno's Comment
member avatar

Thank You, Old School, for your kind reply. I hadn't even heard of a DAC report until now. I really do have a lot to learn!

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Deplorable Numero Uno (that's funny!), here's some information on the DAC report:

What Is The DAC Report?

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Dan R.'s Comment
member avatar

Out of curiosity, why are you racing for the door after just three months with CRE? Are you even out of Phase II yet?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

D. N° 1, now you know the true meaning of GOAL (Get Out And Look). Especially as a rookie, do not guess or assume anything about the parts of the trailer you can't see.

As others have said, one little boo boo like this shouldn't get you kicked out onto the street. And yes, a new company you'll soon be applying to will prefer that you stay the first year. Job hoppers are not appreciated.

Last piece of advice: make every mistake a learning experience. Consciously decide you'll do the right thing to NOT repeat what just happened.

Deplorable Numero Uno's Comment
member avatar

Thank you everyone for your advice and reassurance a relatively minor accident (there's no such thing as a "minor" accident but still...) isn't a career killer. And sorry for my belated reply.

Hey Deplorable Numero Uno (that's funny!), here's some information on the DAC report:

What Is The DAC Report?

Thank you, Brett. This website is great!

Out of curiosity, why are you racing for the door after just three months with CRE? Are you even out of Phase II yet?

Hello Dan, I'm still second seat, but can upgrade to first as soon as I complete my modules which I could do today if I wanted to. I don't want to because I might have to mentor an even newer driver and I'm not that good myself.

CRE is not as bad as the cry babies make it out to be, but there are a few reasons why I'm not interested in staying long. The main ones being:

1) CRE runs almost exclusively reefer which means long waiting times at shippers/ receivers. I hear dry van is a lot better that way, plus you don't have to worry about the reefer running out of fuel (you can't just fill the tank up; you have to get it primed) or breaking down. Every time that happens you have to call CRE's road service, go to Thermo King, call road service again, wait til they call Thermo King, wait til technician gets there if they're closed, etc. Not fun. Also, since you transport food, you have to wash out the trailer very often which means driving off route, unpaid, sometimes many miles. Plus, at least theoretically, reefer trailers are more subject to rollovers. My greatest fear in trucking. That 3,000 lb reefer unit makes the trailer even more top heavy than a regular trailer.

2) CRE has very few dedicated fleet jobs in my area. I'm just out of range their Colton, CA yard.

3) They almost only run teams. By the time I get those 9 to 12 months experience I'll be confident enough to go solo.

4) They are probably the lowest paying truck company in America. Yes, you'll make more once you have the experience, but something tells me you'll make even more somewhere else.

5) Last but not least, I need a three month break from OTR.

I'm not going to be rude or burn any bridges or anything, but I do feel like this company is not a great fit for me.

Thanks again, everyone!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Deplorable #1 wrote:

Plus, at least theoretically, reefer trailers are more subject to rollovers. My greatest fear in trucking. That 3,000 lb reefer unit makes the trailer even more top heavy than a regular trailer.

Quite the stretch on this one...really. The floor and side panels are also heavier on a reefer than on a dry van. If you fear a rollover event, I believe you know exactly how to prevent one or at least reduce the risk of one occurring. I have been under hundreds of reefer loads and empty reefers; in snow, wind and rain, never noticed a greater tendency of top-heavy instability, in fact I prefer to deadhead under a reefer because of the added weight. IMO, I'd take this one off your list of concerns...

Overall I am perplexed with your posts...tired of OTR after only three months? That's barely scratchin' the surface. "Rock-and-a-Hard-Place"; unlikely a local gig will offer you work with only 3 months of experience. Besides if your skills need work, honing them on a local assignment is not the best path to take. Local gigs tend to have way more variables and risks; including tight/aggressive schedules, multiple stops, urban driving, and a greater frequency of close-quarter maneuvering. Are you ready for those possibilities?

Not trying to tell you what to do, but the overwhelming consensus is to stick with your first employer for one full year. A really bad scenario is if you leave CRE, have a contract with them that you have breached, and you have another minor scuff with your new employer... At that point, there is an increased risk of termination putting you in the unenviable position of looking for a third job in less than a year with two preventable accidents on your DAC. At that point your future career is seriously compromised. CRE expects rookies to have minor fender benders during your first 6-12 months. "Hypothetical Local Company"; not as forgiving.

I suggest making a strong effort to work through your fears, issues, and weaknesses. You are a professional truck driver. Start to change your paradigm, think like one.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Deplorable Numero Uno's Comment
member avatar

Deplorable #1 wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

Plus, at least theoretically, reefer trailers are more subject to rollovers. My greatest fear in trucking. That 3,000 lb reefer unit makes the trailer even more top heavy than a regular trailer.

double-quotes-end.png

Quite the stretch on this one...really. The floor and side panels are also heavier on a reefer than on a dry van. If you fear a rollover event, I believe you know exactly how to prevent one or at least reduce the risk of one occurring. I have been under hundreds of reefer loads and empty reefers; in snow, wind and rain, never noticed a greater tendency of top-heavy instability, in fact I prefer to deadhead under a reefer because of the added weight. IMO, I'd take this one off your list of concerns...

Thank you, G-Town, for the additional info on that point. It's reassuring to know side and floor panels are also heavier. I am removing this one from my list of concerns. An instructor at CRE's school told us they were more at risk of a rollover because of the reefer, but that's all he said.

Not trying to tell you what to do, but the overwhelming consensus is to stick with your first employer for one full year. A really bad scenario is if you leave CRE, have a contract with them that you have breached, and you have another minor scuff with your new employer... At that point, there is an increased risk of termination putting you in the unenviable position of looking for a third job in less than a year with two preventable accidents on your DAC. At that point your future career is seriously compromised. CRE expects rookies to have minor fender benders during your first 6-12 months. "Hypothetical Local Company"; not as forgiving.

Oh yeah, I'm staying the length of the contract 100% . And with CRE it's only 9 months total. That's part of the reason I picked them. I did say I'm already tired of OTR , but I'll stick it out.

Thanks.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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