Two Right Turn Lanes....

Topic 20598 | Page 7

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G-Town's Comment
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There are instances where there is no signage, but the right lane is for trucks.

No.

Sorry...when there are two right turn lanes; I absolutely disagree with this. At least in PA & NJ intersections that have two RH turn lanes are marked for no trucks in right most lane.

Your example, I’m sure are correct, makes sense, but most of the time; no way. Read the entire thread.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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And another LEO opinion

0877268001546829833.jpg

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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And this, though not a legal opinion.

0454852001546829957.jpg

G-Town's Comment
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And another LEO opinion

0877268001546829833.jpg

This I agree with And unless otherwise specified by contrary signage; exactly how I operate. NE region, urban running there are many examples of this.

G-Town's Comment
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And this, though not a legal opinion.

0454852001546829957.jpg

Again in complete agreement with this.

LDRSHIP's Comment
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I was just pointing out sometimes there isn’t any signage and you have to observe your surroundings. Yes the rule of thumb is use the outside of the 2 turn lanes. In the place I gave the previous example, if you attempted to use the left of the right hand turn lanes your trailer would off track well into the r/h lane. Some places are very crappy about signage.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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I was just pointing out sometimes there isn’t any signage and you have to observe your surroundings. Yes the rule of thumb is use the outside of the 2 turn lanes. In the place I gave the previous example, if you attempted to use the left of the right hand turn lanes your trailer would off track well into the r/h lane. Some places are very crappy about signage.

I didn’t read this whole thread, so I didn’t see the example, but at least you would be able to see it on your right side. On the left you would be blind.

G-Town's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

I was just pointing out sometimes there isn’t any signage and you have to observe your surroundings. Yes the rule of thumb is use the outside of the 2 turn lanes. In the place I gave the previous example, if you attempted to use the left of the right hand turn lanes your trailer would off track well into the r/h lane. Some places are very crappy about signage.

double-quotes-end.png

I didn’t read this whole thread, so I didn’t see the example, but at least you would be able to see it on your right side. On the left you would be blind.

Grumpy with the possible exception of Patrick’s example; you’ll have more room to work with in the outside lane, and there won’t be any traffic since there are no any additional lanes of traffic on your blindside left. Aim high and you can watch the track of the trailer in the right mirrors as you progress through the right turn.

The geometry favors outside lane running, since the inside lane will have a much tighter radius. As Patrick indicated, and I do agree, situational awareness and common sense must always apply.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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The multiple turn lane treatment will need to vary a bit depending on the design of the intersection. But what I normally do is initially get in the right lane but as I approach the intersection I move the tractor into the outer lane, leaving the trailer tandems in the right lane. I turn using the outer lane but keeping the wheels close enough to the curb that a car can't get by. This usually lets me complete the turn quickly, only briefly blocking multiple lanes. It insures that I won't hit anything, including a 4 wheeler, on the right side, gives me room to avoid any obstacles, and lets me see what is on the left if anyone tries to sneak up there. I've been doing this for several months now and it works like a charm. If for some reason I could not do this, I'd do the whole thing from the outer lane as Brett described.

In my training what Dave Reid is describing was called the "button hook" turn. We were taught that if we approached an intersection and weren't sure we would have enough room (like a blind corner) to button hook it. This was deemed so important to making safe turns that we spent quite a bit of time practicing it.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
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But what I normally do is initially get in the right lane but as I approach the intersection I move the tractor into the outer lane, leaving the trailer tandems in the right lane. I turn using the outer lane but keeping the wheels close enough to the curb that a car can't get by.

I do NOT suggest taking up two lanes to make a right turn when there are two right turning lanes available. It’s unnecessary to perform a buttonhook in this situation and actually introduces more risk.

Use the outer lane, aim “high” and you will not hit anything to your left. I do not know how much more obvious or plainly I can prove that it’s the safest way to execute a turn as described in the subject line.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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