Local Job Possible?

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Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello. After joining this site ans whining like a child or how to get the license. I mustered up the Inner man in me and went to a driving school.

My instructor told me to get the class B license so I would at least get an idea what trucking is like and see if it's for me. Of course being stubborn as was, I didn't listen. I failed a few times . but then the moons aligned and I got the class A in September. Got doubles and tanker.

Since then I have been searching high and low for work that would allow me to work for a small company and not travel over the road.

Got try out with some carting company in upstate NY. When I arrived there I thought to myself boy have u taken the schools trucks for granted. I didnt abuse them or anything but if something fell from the dash onto the " floor " it would hit the ground and fall through the floor.

Anyway I tried out for their road test. There was smoke coming from the 5 speed clutch and they said that the trucks are old and need special attention. They told me to engage the tractor brake / valve at every light since the service brakes would give out.

Anyway, after screwing that up I have been searching and searching and cant find a single company that would hire me. I thought this entire time. Well here is an industry that wants employees. But maybe I was wrong and wasted my saving getting this license.

Is going to the Otr companies like some sort of rite of passage?

Are there Companies that are east region only?

Is it easier to go with panther and do their class B OTR?

After this um " experience " I think he was right all along. I think I really screwed up.

Thabk you for your time.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Deke's Comment
member avatar

I don’t understand why you think you screwed up....because you didn’t find your dream job right out of driving school??

You have your class A license which will allow you to drive any class A or B vehicle (not passenger). So if you want a straight truck job, you can do that.

Terry C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello. After joining this site ans whining like a child or how to get the license. I mustered up the Inner man in me and went to a driving school.

My instructor told me to get the class B license so I would at least get an idea what trucking is like and see if it's for me. Of course being stubborn as was, I didn't listen. I failed a few times . but then the moons aligned and I got the class A in September. Got doubles and tanker.

Since then I have been searching high and low for work that would allow me to work for a small company and not travel over the road.

Got try out with some carting company in upstate NY. When I arrived there I thought to myself boy have u taken the schools trucks for granted. I didnt abuse them or anything but if something fell from the dash onto the " floor " it would hit the ground and fall through the floor.

Anyway I tried out for their road test. There was smoke coming from the 5 speed clutch and they said that the trucks are old and need special attention. They told me to engage the tractor brake / valve at every light since the service brakes would give out.

Anyway, after screwing that up I have been searching and searching and cant find a single company that would hire me. I thought this entire time. Well here is an industry that wants employees. But maybe I was wrong and wasted my saving getting this license.

Is going to the Otr companies like some sort of rite of passage?

Are there Companies that are east region only?

Is it easier to go with panther and do their class B OTR?

After this um " experience " I think he was right all along. I think I really screwed up.

Thabk you for your time.

Hey there Art. I'm going to level with you. You would think that getting a local Class A job would be easy with all the trucks out there right? Well here are a couple cold hard facts. Local driving, although typically uses small equipment, is a bit more difficult and dangerous. Unlike OTR where you maybe have 1or 2 backing maneuvers in a day between the truck stop and/or shipper/reciever, local driving entails driving mostly rural streets with, depending on the company, several maneuvers a day in tight parking lots or 2 lane roads. Not large distribution centers. Unless you find a job pulling doubles.

The bottom line is, due to accidents/incidents, local trucking companies heavily rely on "experienced" drivers. And the easiest way to get it is driving OTR for at least a year. OTR jobs are much much easier to get and don't pay all too bad as well. You just have to deal with the away time.

And to bring up the possible workload local driving can bring to it. In the food service delivery section alone, you'll be unloading 12k to 32k of food by hand 10-14 hours a day 60-70 hours a week. Sounds fun eh? You may be home every day but you still don't have much of a life and now you're doing a hell of alot of manual labor.

Think cautiously about what you wish for. You just might get it. ;)

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
My instructor told me to get the class B license so I would at least get an idea what trucking is like and see if it's for me. Of course being stubborn as was, I didn't listen. I failed a few times . but then the moons aligned and I got the class A in September. Got doubles and tanker.

Good for you! Like Deke said, you can still drive class B vehicles with your class A cdl. Getting a class B would have only restricted you.

I agree with Terry. There are lots of jobs but local companies typically search mainly for experienced drivers.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Also, people somehow get it in their head that they want to work for a small carrier. I'm not sure why, but it seems people will think it's more like a family. Well I can assure you it's not. Here's a couple of articles I've written on the subject:

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

I did the fingerprints for the Hazmat and apparently did something wrong. So I had to re do the Haz 44 application they sent me. I was waiting to apply back to yrc because I one of my school instructors works there. I guess I don't really want to go anywhere else ( besides FedEx ) because I don't have a friendly face there.

I sent the application back thinking maybe it would take another month. I have been applying for part time work but most Van Delivery companies wouldn't take me. ( like mini van / courier van ). I have a clean record.

On a side note. I am worried about getting out shape while on the road. Im not in the best shape. But I really need to lose it for the cop exam.

But all of you are right. I am not getting younger and time is wasting away.

Also I am worried about screwing up the clean license I have now. I heard there are a 1,000 regulations for class A driving.

Have to brush up on the FAQ of Team driving if there is one here. Maybe it's not so lonely.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Troll.

Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, people somehow get it in their head that they want to work for a small carrier. I'm not sure why, but it seems people will think it's more like a family. Well I can assure you it's not. Here's a couple of articles I've written on the subject:

Because I have as taken on a friend's roll off route twice. The drivers there see each other at least twice a day or run into each other on a few separate occasions a day. Either while refueling or on a construction site and shoot the $&%@ for some time. It looks like fun. I was shown around to see what it was like. I really enjoyed that. Everyone was nice. Not like most of the people I met at truck stops, when I decided to go to one for the hell of it. I don't think much of the culture of Class A to be honest. Helped one guy with a tarp at the stop after we got to talking.

And after the roll off. The guy that took me on it just went home to his wife and kids.

Granted he has bee doing it since he was little. Has over 30 years of experience in Europe. Told me it doesn't count for anything here. So he had to start over as a rookie.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Art A.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, people somehow get it in their head that they want to work for a small carrier. I'm not sure why, but it seems people will think it's more like a family. Well I can assure you it's not. Here's a couple of articles I've written on the subject:

A friend of mine took me on a roll off route a few times. The drivers saw each other throughout the day. Whether they were re fueling or saw each other at construction sites. Everyone knew each other. Got introduced to some good people.

During school instead of leaving the area. I decided to go to a truck stop. Most of the people were rude. Helped on guy with his tarp after we spoke about the " life". After meeting one guy that was nice and staying there for 3 hours. I don't think much of the class A drivers. Sorry I just don't.

After seeing that role off guy and knowing he sees his family every night. I thought I could get something like that too.

He keeps telling me everytime to find out how to join the union so I get the same job he has. When I was in school he was pleading so I don't get the class A. He said it's a waste of time. Now each time I see him and tell him I may have to go for a year to otr. He gets upset.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
he was pleading so I don't get the class A. He said it's a waste of time

Seriously? Getting a Class A is a waste of time?

Ya know, if you're going to take advice like that then I really don't know if you're going to recognize the difference between sound, logical advice and a bunch of baloney anyhow.

I don't think much of the class A drivers. Sorry I just don't

Well, out of the 3 million or so Class A drivers out there you did meet about 10 or so in some random truck stop on some random day. Turns out they weren't as friendly as a good friend of yours was? Well that sounds like sound scientific data you're gathering there.

On a side note. I am worried about getting out shape while on the road. Im not in the best shape. But I really need to lose it for the cop exam.

What "cop exam"? Now you're going to become a cop?

So you're either going to drive a rig OTR , or be an owner-operator with Panther running class B OTR, or you're going to run team, or you might haul dumpsters, or you might become a cop?

wtf-2.gif

Get it together Art. Figure out what you want to do.

Do you want to drive a truck or not, and how often do you want to be home? That's the first place to start. Most new drivers will not get an opportunity to run local straight out of school with a Class A company. I'm not even sure you'll get an opportunity hauling dumpsters straight out of school, but you might.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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