Schneider Tanker Training Pay

Topic 21793 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Tyrone C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hows it going? I am currently on the path of obtaining my Cdl license through Schneider’s paid training program. The position I will be going after is an OTR tanker driver. I was wondering if anyone could provide me with the training pay as well as some info on how training will be. Any help/info is appreciated. Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Are you in Schneider's school now? If so, they are the best people to ask. You can also put Schneider training in the search bar at the top of this page and find info that way.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Tyronne I am going to assume you are brand new to trucking since your in the cdl school. I would suggest you go van for at least a year before jumping to tanks. I pulled tanker for 1 1/2 yrs and it is a different breed of cat. I met alot of schneiders drivers and they did basically what we did. I hear they have a good school but that is information overload at this stage of your career. You can do alot of damage with a tanker with a minor mis step. You can always transfer over later once you get the basics of driving under your belt. They pull totally different, they react different and they can be dangerous to off load. Just my opinion from being there and doing it

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'll put my vote in with PJ. I'm always recommending people make conservative choices at the beginning of their trucking career. One of the things that confuses new drivers at the onset of their new career is thinking they are not going to be making good enough money with certain types of trucking jobs. So they start looking into things like Hazmat and tanker, presuming they will make more money that way. Rookie drivers all make rookie mistakes and that decision is one of the most common blunders.

It's not so much the pay rate (CPM) that effects a rookie drivers gross pay as it is their ability to grasp the concepts of success in trucking. It generally takes a person with the necessary ambition and craftiness to make a go at this career about two to three years to really get their stride under them so they're making good money. I honestly don't know if you went with tanker because of the pay rate or not, but learning how to be effective at this job through time management and building a good solid relationship with dispatch will do way more for your bottom line than your rate of pay.

This business is completely performance based. Therefore the top performers reap the top pay. My point is that you can more easily focus on your performance without having all the distractions of the added safety related issues that come with hauling tankers. We've had some new guys in here start with tankers and they've done okay. We've also had a few that regretted that choice.

Here's a link to an article on Making a Prudent Choice for Your First Trucking Job.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tyrone C.'s Comment
member avatar

I appreciate every single one of yalls responses. Big Scott no I am not in school. I am going through the steps of enrolling. I wanted to ask schneider as well as ask other drivers just to see what answers I get and if they match up. PJ and Old School I mainly chose tankers because my uncle use to pull them back in the day and advise me to go with that. Before he told me I was interested in tankers/hazmat ever since I was a kid. The extra caution and procedures that go along with pulling tankers is what really drawing me in. I like challenges and things that forces me to really pay attentionto the details. Im aware that this is nothing to play around with, but that is great advise to start with van then switch over. I just want to see if Im up to the task and just go from there.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

I understand the allure. You should get a good foundation under you first for the driving basics. Schneider isn’t going out of the tanker business anytime soon. It’s like climbing a ladder. Start on the bottom rung and walk your way up. Your going to be overwhelmed with enough of a challenge just starting out. I’ve seen more bad things with tanks than I care to admit, from wrecks to damaged tanks hurting people. For me the tank itself was easier, I was a boiler tech in the navy for 8 years and alot of those principles translate. Get the driving basics down for a year or so and transfer over to the tank division

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Lowry F.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a conditional hire based on graduation cuz Schneider does not offer school in my area I went to one of the Schneider approved schools. On the website it says orientation is 3 weeks at 400 a week lodging breakfast and lunch are provided. I would not want to start out on tanks I have driven a couple hundred gallon tanks in beds of pickups then multiply that by thousands, smooth bore would be a huge learning lession if not a career ender. Good luck whatever you decide.

Tyrone C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hope all is going well with yall. Just wanted to update yall on my progress. I got my cdl with all endorsements/hazmat. I’m currently in Schneider’s tanker orientation. First day was monday...today we was showed how to unload the tank with the pump, tomorrow we’ll be doing it with air, and sunday we start driving and learning how to drive the Schneider’s way. So far Im enjoying the whole experience and learning alot.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

Welcome back Tyrone.. Fellow tanker driver here, do keep the updates coming and glad to hear things are going well for you.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Congrats on taking the leap Tyrone. Keep everything as smooth as possible & leave ample distance from anything in front of you. I’m hoping to make the swirch from reefer to tanker in a few months myself. Wishing you a safe & successful career. BTW, what is Schneider’s tanker pay?

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More