Maverick Glass Vs Flatbed Division.

Topic 21875 | Page 1

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GW's Comment
member avatar

So I have been reading here for a few months now and enjoying the wealth of knowledge. I have been accepted for training at Maverick, my question is what is the major difference in glass vs flatbed. They say glass gets more money per mile, but flatbed averages more miles. Is glass really that much more of a challenge than flatbed? I have never been afraid of a hard days work and as far as I know it is just higher heights in tarping. If someone could clue me in if it is more than heights please let me know. Thank you for your input.

Kyle M.'s Comment
member avatar

One big difference is flatbed is home like 99% percent of weekends if you chose the regional glass is a minimum of 2 weeks out but they told me they prefer 3-4 for glass and they go in and out of Canada. There is a maverick driver on here that could explain more im sure but I can't think of his name right now.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

I have seen their glass trucks. They are flatbeds with a rack. I think the tarps are built in. So the glass gets loaded and you tarp and strap it. If they pay one division more CPM for less miles, that is just to even out the pay. Hope that helps.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I may be the driver kyle was referring to. Anyway, the main differences are length of haul, running lanes, live loading, and obviously the products. A good portion of the glass loads are preloaded while most of flat is live. However, live loads of glass can take several hours to complete where as I can secure and tarp a load in 45min. Glass guys will run out to California and Canada where flatbed doesn't do Canada and stays east of the rockies. Hometime can be weekly with flatbed if you're regional and glass has the 2 week minimum. As was mentioned, they recommend 3 or 4 weeks to get the miles. As for miles, regional will average less obviously since we go home on weekends. East coast gets a little less than mid west since we have more freight there and the terrain is easier to deal with.

Glass guys will occasionally haul regular flatbed loads like lumber or coils to get back to their glass plants. They also do a lot of deadheading. We are paid the same regardless so it's no big deal. Flatbed average haul is 5 or 600 miles I'd say, and glass may be twice that. I'd base my decision on Hometime and how adventurous you are. I'm in the regional Atlantic or RAT division aka east coast. I average about 2000 miles in the slow times and 2500 or more when it picks up. The cpm balances it out so I drive less and make decent money still. I could do otr or switch to glass but hometime is my priority. Hope this helps.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

GW's Comment
member avatar

Thank you all for the quick feedback. So CT., if I am reading you right, for a single guy that would prefer driving out west and Canada doesn't bother him (I don't know what I don't know yet about trucking in Canada), and isn't necessarily concerned about home time yet; the glass division might be the best opportunity. I guess my next question would be if I start in glass and get tired of it or simply don't like it, would I be able to transfer easily into flatbed division in 6 to 12 months?

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for late reply. Yes I'd absolutely recommend glass if it's just you to worry about. They want you to stick to one division for six months before switching. You can swap regions (midwest, east coast etc) at anytime if you relocate. Just a heads up though, typically glass trainers aren't as plentiful as flatbed. I knew a few guys who had to go out with a flatbed trainer until a glass driver was available. Just ask your recruiter about everything.

Kyle M.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes C.T. you are the driver I was referring too. Glad you seen this

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