On The Home Stretch Of Deciding...

Topic 22051 | Page 2

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Jody B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Old School, this shows my ignorance in the decision making process. I read that it is better for home time to be close to a terminal. I currently live on a mountain so no way to get the truck to my current residence. Not sure if that matters or not. Did see good reviews on Millis, but read Brett’s article on (reviews) and understand the bias each way. It can be overwhelming with the variety of choices.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

When I was looking for my CDL school/first job I really wanted to do the lower 48. And I wanted the shortest contract just cause I hate to be obligated for anything. Pay wasn't really an issue for me cause I had another source of income. I chalked my first year up to being gone nearly the whole time.

Did I have to? No but I really wanted to just learn as much as I could and get it out of the way. I went with CRST, they had an 11 month contract. I was living in Norfolk, VA at the time (which may as well be a mountain when your new)

Bringing home the truck wasn't an option without tickets and accidents.

That first year flys by so try and think of all the things you find important outside of hometime. That part will work itself out. The company I'm at now I have to ask to stay out longer than two weeks... Why would I wanna stay out? Cause I like it and cause I need more vacation time for Mexico for the second time in 9 months😁

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jody B.'s Comment
member avatar

Cecil, I actually looked in to CRST and spoke with a recruiter, the pay seemed low to me. Does 12 months experience actually open that many more doors? Guess companies want to make sure you stick with it and not tear up trucks?

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Like I said, pay wasn't a really high priority for me as I had other income. I did notice the same thing when looking. But they were a team gig and teams get to make ridiculously long runs. And to me at that time was more important to me than the money. We might not be in the same boat.

As for rather the 12 months makes a difference? Look at companies that don't offer training, see what they require and decide that for yourself.

The company I'm with now hauling a Food Grade or smooth bore tanker won't even talk to you without 2 yrs experience "and for very good reason" This is just a for example. But I've put my 2yrs and change in and I now make very very very good money.😁🤑

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I would also look into Prime. Some people don't understand that there is alot to learn when starting any new job.

This translates into either not making a great check one week and getting upset and quiting. Or maybe they decide not to make the check calls to brokers which can cost a company five hundred dollars.

Or not getting up at one in the morning and leaving a place like Jersey or Los Angeles before traffic.

Route planning takes time and experience and not just map reading skills.

Again lots to learn but with time things get easier and more companies will look at you and by then you may decide that you like whom you started with. Money will come. But learn the job before you expect the money and everything will work a lot smoother.

Why did I make that long rant? Because trucking is a revolving door of people thinking it's easy. The statistics are staggering. But if you make good decisions and don't mind putting in the effort.. Cancun, Cozumel, Playa Del Carmen twice a year😎 Maybe Brazil next year

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Does 12 months experience actually open that many more doors? Guess companies want to make sure you stick with it and not tear up trucks?

Jody, we understand how this is completely new to you. I'm not sure how much you've been poking around here in the web site, but here's a little nugget you ought to listen to. It's a great podcast on Why You Should Stick With Your First Company For One Year.

It's not easy becoming proficient at truck driving. There's so much to learn. People who are looking into this career think it's all about driving, so they wonder just how difficult can that be? Well, something like 95% of new entry level drivers never make it to that one year mark. Think about that. It says volumes. That first year is a very steep learning curve filled with a lot of unexpected surprises. Reaching that one year anniversary mark with your first company is a big deal. Many have tried it, but only a select few can say they accomplished it.

Have you looked at these resources?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

If Cartersville is convenient for you there is a T/A and Pilot there. Both are places you could leave your truck. The T/A has mostly paid spaces. They are making all there places mostly paid spots. T/A/Petro and Pilot/Flying J seem to be playing a game of screw the driver. Sorry for the rant.

While I drive for CFI and love them for many reasons. Home time being my number one. Like most companies you earn one day of home time for every seven out. However, with CFI you don't lose your days and can save them up. For example, I just came of of eight days of home time. I used four PTO days to help offset the time without income. We earn PTO time as we drive.

With all that said, of the many companies I researched, Millis was one of my top choices. I think they are a good company and have heard many good things about them.

Good luck.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

If you want to be based out of Cartersville, I'm sure you're aware that Millis has a terminal there where they also train new perspective drivers. No problem parking at any terminal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Jody B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the many responses! The hardest part will be leaving this 5 year old laying beside me! Even though every decision I make has them in mind and want to do what’s best it’s still hard. Sure you all have had to make similar decisions. Funny story, my mom and stepdad came to visit and on the way back to south ga my step dad said I sure do love that little fella. My mom said you know you have 8 more grandkids right? He said yep, but that one acts like he loves me back! I have 3 kids and the little fella loves his daddy! Lol. Cwc, was that an invite to Mexico? Just checking. You all stay safe out there and thanks again from this ol’ Georgia boy!

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Jody, I just read through this whole conversation and it's just all over the place. To be honest, at this point I have no idea what your priorities are for the type of truck driving job you're looking for. You said you don't like the heat or the cold, and you've implied that maybe you're not as fit as you'd like to be, but you're looking at flatbed companies. I don't get that. It doesn't sound like that's your gig.

Where your brother works really has no bearing on this whatsoever. Your brother isn't happy because he's with a great company, though he does happen to be with a great company. If he's happy it's almost certainly because he's doing an awesome job and he'd be happy pretty much anywhere he worked. A great driver will have it good no matter where they work. So that's not a factor.

You're also concerned about terminal location which Old School pointed out isn't a factor at all.

So my question is why are you comparing companies at this point when you don't seem to have the first idea about what types of jobs are available? The subject of this conversation is "on the home stretch of deciding" but to be honest you're nowhere near the point of deciding. You really have to understand the different types of jobs out there and how they differ with regard to lifestyle, home time, and the challenges and opportunities they present.

1) How often do you want to get home?

2) How much physical work would you like to do?

3) What regions of the country would you like to run?

4) Do you think you might want to switch to another type of freight at some point?

These are the types of questions you need to be able to answer before you can begin looking for the right company.

Please go through this section of our truck driver's career guide:

How To Evaluate & Choose A Trucking Company

Also go through our articles on how to choose a trucking company:

Finding The Right Truck Driving Job

Do a bunch of reading so you know the types of choices you'll have to make in order to find the right company. Once you understand the options you have you'll be able to find a company that matches up well with your preferences.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Choosing A Trucking Company
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More