Flatbed Physical Tests..

Topic 22059 | Page 1

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Marty G.'s Comment
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For the Flatbed carriers, what is examined during the physical testing portion? Is it simply the ability to lift up a 100lbs tarp off the ground and place onto the Flatbed or are you to walk x amount of feet while lifting the tarp? Im looking to really start my driving career in Flatbedding because of the great home time available.

Vitamin's Comment
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I recently did the agility test for a company, so I can only speak for what we did there.

They first take your blood pressure and pulse, and then take your pulse after everything you do.

We lifted some boxes with weights in them, ranging from 35 to 100 lbs, from the floor to either your chest or waist. It was either the 75 or 100 lbs that came to your chest, I don't remember.

We stepped up on a box about 10" tall then stepped down for 1 minute at a set rate around 95 beats per minute. We did this three times with a minute or so rest between each.

Climbed on and off a trailer, twice.

Lifted a trap from the ground and set it on a trailer, twice.

Played with some nuts and bolts at arms length over a trailer for 2 minutes.

Played with a box with bolts on it down on one knee for 2 minutes.

Lifted a 35lb(?) box off of a trailer high enough to see under it.

I think that was everything. It Doesn't sound like much, but it is a workout. Basically they want to see if you are physically capable to do the job. They know your BP and pulse will go up, they just want to make sure it doesn't get too high.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Turtle's Comment
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Somehow I didn't see this post until now.

Anyhoo, Prime's flatbed physical is very similar to the one Vitamin described. We also had to climb a few rungs up a ladder and back down 3 times in a row.

Nothing strenuous really, but it will raise your heart rate, as it's designed to.

Marty G.'s Comment
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Thanks guys a appreciate it, the School i will be leaving for is Maverick, sometime in the middle of April. I kinda figured they would do cardio tests for endurance and blood pressure, that really wont be a problem for me, i was more concerned about the physical part of the testing, I was medically discharged from the military after tearing both my Achillies tendons, so i was kind of concerned for possible re-injury.

JuiceBox's Comment
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It varies but at Melton we lifted a tarp onto a trailer and were watched for correct form. Lift with your legs not your back. We stood on 1 leg for 30 seconds for both left and right to check our balance. That was it so no sweat really. Not sure if it's changed in the last 4 months.

Old School's Comment
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Hello Marty!

Having never torn an Achilles tendon I can't really relate to what kind of problems that will give you. Just keep in mind that there are times when doing a flat-bed job that you will need to be walking around with a tarp hoisted up on one shoulder. It can be a fairly physical job at times. Sometimes you may be climbing a ladder or climbing up on top of your load to lay out your tarps. I would assume you know how to manage your activities and preserve yourself from further injury. The one thing I think about that might put a strain on your Achilles tendon during a pre-employment physical agility test would be doing a "duck-walk" underneath a trailer. Some companies will have you squat and then sort of walk under the trailer in that squatted position.

Just one more piece of advice: Flat-bedding is something that a lot of people don't enjoy. You will find that flat-bedders are a little different. They are kind of hard core people who really enjoy not only the physical aspect of their job, but also working out in the elements. They enjoy doing the calculations necessary to know that their load is secured properly. I would not recommend doing flat-bed just so you can be home on the weekends. I would make sure that you were enjoying what you do all week. If you are miserable in your trucking job, you will never be able to be successful at it.

You can get some good exposure to the type of math involved in flat-bed work by working your way through these two sections of our High Road CDL Training Program.

Cargo Securement

Securing Metal Coils (New York State Endorsement)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Marty G.'s Comment
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Thanks again guys, i appreciate the feedback and Old School, it is the physical aspect of flatbedding that has me interested in it. The "duck walk" is an excercise that i am familiar with doing, had to do it quite a few times while in physical therapy, but as long as im not carrying more than 40lbs during this exercise i should he fine. Another reason why im going with flatbedding is because i am limited to which schools actually approved my application with CDL training. Which are really only two of them.

CFI and Maverick.

TMC, Prime, Miliis transfer Swift snd Stevens were all a no go. Celadon and PAM transport have forced team driving which im not interested in at all. Roehl, CRST and Jim Palmer only offer OTR until a fixed period of time. I have 2 young sons, i dont want to stay away from them for too long.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
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That all sounds good Marty. Keep us posted. We'd love to hear about your progress and experiences along the way.

Simon N.'s Comment
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That all sounds good Marty. Keep us posted. We'd love to hear about your progress and experiences along the way.

Hey Old School...In still a Rookie...3Mths....when should i start flat bedding....I really don't wanna mess up in my career...

Old School's Comment
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I gave you an answer in your other thread.

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