Swift

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Jordan C.'s Comment
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Well I just got off the phone with the recruitment department from mtc school. I have been placed with swift trucking. I want any and all opinions of how they work and operate. They say 240 hrs with trainer. Also they say new drivers must go otr for six months. Does anyone know what other routes they have regionally. Anyone have anything about them I would love to know. Thanks. How is training and everything any one knows would be great.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jordan, Congratulations man! Don't you worry you're in good hands. I know there's at least a couple of drivers on here who work at Swift, and I'm sure they'll chime in here when they get the chance. In the mean time you just keep your head up and do your best to do a great job with a really good attitude, and you'll be on your way to success. Swift is a very large company and they are constantly adding new drivers, so they know how to do this. Any time these large companies take all these risks adding new folks to their team there's going to be a some whiners and complainers (they're actually slackers who couldn't be truck drivers if their life depended on it) spewing out a bunch of trash about them on the internet - it just comes with the territory. So, do yourself a big favor, and don't pay any attention to all that stuff, and just stay focused on how you're going to be the best driver they've ever put behind the wheel of a Big Rig. One more thing, Swift is one of those companies that's got a lot of different different driving opportunities that you can move over into once you've proven yourself. Go Get Em!

good-luck.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
So, do yourself a big favor, and don't pay any attention to all that stuff, and just stay focused on how you're going to be the best driver they've ever put behind the wheel of a Big Rig. One more thing, Swift is one of those companies that's got a lot of different different driving opportunities that you can move over into once you've proven yourself. Go Get Em!

Amen!!!!

Listen, we tell everyone this - focus on yourself. Swift has been around for decades - they're an excellent company with a ton of awesome opportunities. Make sure you know the logbook rules inside and out. Make sure you have your home life in order (finances, relationships, etc) so that when it comes time to leave you can relax and focus on learning your trade. Make sure you work on staying positive, confident, and optimistic and prepare yourself to do everything possible to get along with the people you'll be dealing with regardless of the circumstances you encounter.

There isn't anything in the world that anyone can tell you about Swift or any other company that will give you a better chance at being happy and successful there because what works for Swift works for every company in the nation - hard work, a focus on safety, reliability, and handling yourself like a true professional. If you'll do that, you'll make good money, you'll be treated fairly, and you'll have a great start to your career.

There are indeed a number of people here that work for Swift and I'm sure they'll be able to give you more details about what opportunities will be available in the beginning, how long the training will be, and stuff like that. But in the end, it all comes down to you. And that's about the best thing that anyone can hope for - to be the captain of their own destiny. Trucking will make you exactly that - you're the captain. Show up with a smile, work hard, listen & learn, and focus on safety at all times and you'll do awesome regardless of the company.

smile.gif

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BHall's Comment
member avatar

They have many dedicated routes (Wal-mart and others) but am not really sure what is in your area. They fill spots as needed with safe and reliable drivers. One thing that may interest you is the Great Lakes regional-pay is more but the runs are shorter. You would almost be guaranteed to get near home on a weekly basis as it goes north to the border, between the Mtns. east and west and as far south as I-40 basically. Good Luck!

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

David's Comment
member avatar

Swifts a good company to start with. Im currently driving for them. About to hit my 6 month with them.

240hr training isn't bad.. all i can say on that is Listen to your trainer. Practice your backups when you can and good luck with sleeping. moving truck is hard to sleep in.. And if the top bunk has a restraint system, your'll probably sleep there while your trainer drives. You also may have to drive at night for 8-11 hrs.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Most all trainees get some night driving...and I prefer it...my favorite time on the road. And I sleep the best when the truck is hummin' down the road !!! kinda like those hotel vibrating beds !! basically, the only difference between company training is pay while you train, and the length of time you will be with a trainer.....The rest of it is just their policies overall.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bigdubber's Comment
member avatar

... And if the top bunk has a restraint system, your'll probably sleep there while your trainer drives.

I was under the impression that sleeping in the top bunk while the truck is moving was "illegal"... am I misinformed? confused.gif

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Bigdubber, I think you are correct.....and tho I love sleeping while the truck is rolling...I couldn't do it in the top bunk. And I can't stand those tie downs on the bunk...I have enclosed space anxiety...So I hope someone looks it up to see if it is legal or not...but I've seen to many roll overs where the top of the sleeper is flattened...I won't be the one pancaked in that mess,

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I'm 95% sure it's not illegal. It's just against most company policies for obvious safety reasons. But I've never heard that it's actually illegal.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

With all the rules they have for truckers...confused.gif ...and they leave a trucker, sound asleep, goin' down the road at 60-65 mph, strapped into his bunk, with nothing between him and the great outdoors but a layer of fiberglass, some insulation, and paint.shocked.png ..And who sez Big Brother doesn't take good care of us ???? wtf.gif

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