Reaching Out To The Professional Truck Drivers Here

Topic 22234 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Villain's Comment
member avatar

3rd day of "training". I am going to be posting a lot of questions over the near future. For those of you who will be wondering why I am not asking my trainer, a little background: I went to CDL School in 2005, didn't find the opportunity to get job until last week (felony).

My trainer: experience - almost 2 yrs, in our 1st conversation tells me he is terrible at backing which sucks cause if I learn nothing else, having the right understanding and technique to dock is the main thing, I'll figure the rest out. Day 1, just left shipper , approaching red light, he's looking for youtube video (again, fiddles with the #! @ phone every 5min), 1 vehicle stopped ahead, I have to say 3 times, louder each time STOP THE TRUCK! Hard brake, close call. His pre-trip consist of pulling out hammer and banging the tires (Solution - I get up early before he wakes up & do pre-trip, also do a walk around during fuel stops & post trip inspection) I could go on but that should provide the context of my situation. I am an over thinker. Since I found out that I was hired, I've been reading up & watching every training video I can. I checked out other forums, but this is the 1 I come to 90% of the time. I identify with the message of personal responsibility that I read in so many of the articles. If you've read this far thank you.

On to the questions: (1) Start of day, Canton NY, 10AM temperature is 28. I walk over to a 10ft, 1 inch deep puddle that's frozen & stomp on it & it cracks apart. So does that mean that if I am going at a safe speed those 12520lbs on the front axle (current weight because of course a little extra weight is "no big deal" - trainer) should be able to drive through patches? (2) Bridges ice before roads, at what degree above 32 should I be on the look out, 40, 36?

BTW I'm not some menace on the roadways swerving all over the place. I drive a clean line, adjust my driving to load weight, road, weather, & traffic conditions, follow at a safe distance, make my lane changes & passing safely & decisively, etc. I'm just inexperienced/lacking knowledge of 2nd level trucking driving. I will succeed, your help will get me there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob S.'s Comment
member avatar

Since you noticed the ice in the puddle that tells me that you're observant. I think you might know the answers already. There is no magic number at which you suddenly change your driving style. Even if there were, how can we know exactly what the temperature is? The on board thermometer is not exactly made to NASA specs.

You are adjusting your driving to the conditions, that's great, stay alert and you'll be fine.

It sounds like you dealing with a difficult trainer too. It's only for a few weeks. Once you get your own keys you will relax and just do the job. You'll have a blast most of the time. The days that suck will be rare but you'll probably learn a lot from them if you try.

Tip: you can practice backing at any truckstop with painted lines. Go to the back row (away from the supertruckers), turn on your flashers and have at it :)

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

First thing I'd recommend is to ask for another trainer, after explaining most of what you wrote in your comments. I do wonder, is this a major carrier or a tiny, local company?

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Even a bad trainer can teach you things..you can learn what NOT to do. learn from his mistakes.

Calkansan's Comment
member avatar

I watch for spray from tires of other vehicles. If spray, probably no ice. No spray, ice. Drive safe speed for conditions. Roadway will be little warmer than air temp due to friction from tires and warmth of day. I also walk up to the street exit at truck stop to see road. Just a few suggestions.

Villain's Comment
member avatar

@PackRat This is a small 10 truck outfit the situation is what it is.

Villain's Comment
member avatar

@Calkansan, Rob S. Great advice thank you. I'm making a folder in Google Keep to store and review advice. My confidence just went up a notch 😀

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

@PackRat This is a small 10 truck outfit the situation is what it is.

That's what I was afraid of. Well, since he may be the only trainer, do the best you can. Go slow, ask lots of questions and use a bunch of common sense. If something doesn't look or seem right, get clarification. Take a lot of notes, and keep stuff written down. Send important stuff on the Qualcomm so there is a record. Nobody is a great driver from the start. It takes patience, persistence and lots of practice.good-luck.gif

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I would love to say that it sounds like he's testing you but... that may not be the case. Sounds like you have a decent head on your shoulders, just keep using it.

Keep doing all the pre and post trips, no reason not to. Today I was passed by a truck with a flat trailer tire. He didn't have a clue he had it either. I got on the radio with another driver I had been running with all morning and he let the guy know and he finally made it off the road. I was sure I was going to hit parts of a tire or a car that had been smashed by the tire... The things your doing now will set the trend for later down the road.

Temp wise.. just as others have said.. no specified temp.

But as cars pass look at their tires if you see spray coming off it's not ice... Not yet or right in that particular spot anyway.

But if you feel as though it's getting close to that temperature range slow down... Give yourself lots of room. And don't be afraid to shut down.

I recently started pulling a smooth bore tanker. And I can tell you this... I'm a wimp when it comes to driving through heavy snow or ice... I'm the first to pull off and the last to get back on.

I've done my share of running in bad weather to make it to shippers or receivers but I'm pretty much done with that now. Save yourself the stress and just skip it all together.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Villian, I wouldn't sweat it too badly that you don't have a stellar trainer. To be honest with you, those same problems occur at large carriers. I had a terrible trainer, yet I still developed into a halfway decent driver. Much of our success in this career is on us.

Do the best you can with your situation, and stay in touch with your new friends here. There will be plenty of help and good advice from the folks here when you need it. Look at your training time like riding a bicycle with training wheels. The trainer is there just to keep you from really hurting yourself. Eventually you'll kind of figure it out on your own with practice. Then the trainer will be gone.

I know it's not ideal, but it works. Hang tough, and keep in touch. We will do what we can to help you out.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More