Background Checks

Topic 22337 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Joe W.'s Comment
member avatar

Does anybody know if the bigger companies like Swift or Prime do background checks over ten years?

Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't have an answer, but I am curious... Do you mean them checking for only the last ten years or them caring only about the last ten years?

I only ask because some things have no time limit and some are just company discretion.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Work history the last 3 years if 10 years if you were a driver.

driving record, the last 3 years

convictions and DUI are company specific. some companies will not allow even 1 DUI others might say 2, others might say 1 in a lifetime

be honest and only answer what is asked. "Have gou EVER been convicted" is much different from "have you been convicted the last 3 years"

I work for Prime who is stricter than others. there are "second chance" companies but might as well try the others first.

whats the issue...we might be able to help

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Criminal history checks go back forever by everyone. That said, some companies will except candidates with older criminal convictions, which they usually evaluate on a case by case basis.

Does anybody know if the bigger companies like Swift or Prime do background checks over ten years?

Joe W.'s Comment
member avatar

I have two DUI's, 18 and 20 years ago. Just worried because I was sent home from Werner on day three of orientation because had 3 week CDL school instead of 5 weeks. Big waste of time. I have heard of people being sent home for other reasons even if they were approved by safety dept. beforehand. Now I'm a little leery about going anywhere.

Work history the last 3 years if 10 years if you were a driver.

driving record, the last 3 years

convictions and DUI are company specific. some companies will not allow even 1 DUI others might say 2, others might say 1 in a lifetime

be honest and only answer what is asked. "Have gou EVER been convicted" is much different from "have you been convicted the last 3 years"

I work for Prime who is stricter than others. there are "second chance" companies but might as well try the others first.

whats the issue...we might be able to help

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Joe DUIs are considered very differently by trucking companies, and for good reason. As per Rainy's comprehensive reply (please read what she suggested especially pertaining to filling out applications, very important), each company has their own policy for DUIs. Contrary to Werner's explanation or your understanding of it, they have a lifetime limit of 1 DUI. With 2 no matter how old or why, you are disqualified because of Werner's hiring policy. This is perhaps the reason you were sent home. That's the hard truth.

3 weeks of schooling vs. 5 weeks of school; not exactly true. Any reputable school will provide you a certificate proving successful completion of the minimum required 160 hours of instruction. This certificate, plus the valid CDL pre-qualifies you for most all carriers hiring newbies. Without it, any reputable company will not be able to hire you; their insurance will not cover you. That said, all of the trucking companies offering Paid CDL Training Programs are about 3-3.5 weeks duration of instruction necessary to pass the CDL tests. Do you have any training certificate from the school you graduated from? If not, you will likely need to repeat this step to satisfy insurance requirements of a prospective employer.

Here is what I suggest, study each company found in this link: Trucking Company Reviews

Identify any company that road-trains (aka: mentoring or finish training), will hire entry level drivers and accepts 2 DUI's as part of their hiring policy. Like Rainy said, be careful how applications are worded; only provide exactly what is asked for, noting more and nothing less.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Joe W.'s Comment
member avatar

I do have a certificate but it is for 80-hour refresher. When I contacted the school, in the beginning, I told them I had driven for a while for Schlumberger in 2008. Went to their two-week school even. Wasn't a whole lot of driving but the head of the school said a refresher would be good. Now it seems to be a problem, at least for Werner.

Joe DUIs are considered very differently by trucking companies, and for good reason. As per Rainy's comprehensive reply (please read what she suggested especially pertaining to filling out applications, very important), each company has their own policy for DUIs. Contrary to Werner's explanation or your understanding of it, they have a lifetime limit of 1 DUI. With 2 no matter how old or why, you are disqualified because of Werner's hiring policy. This is perhaps the reason you were sent home. That's the hard truth.

3 weeks of schooling vs. 5 weeks of school; not exactly true. Any reputable school will provide you a certificate proving successful completion of the minimum required 160 hours of instruction. This certificate, plus the valid CDL pre-qualifies you for most all carriers hiring newbies. Without it, any reputable company will not be able to hire you; their insurance will not cover you. That said, all of the trucking companies offering Paid CDL Training Programs are about 3-3.5 weeks duration of instruction necessary to pass the CDL tests. Do you have any training certificate from the school you graduated from? If not, you will likely need to repeat this step to satisfy insurance requirements of a prospective employer.

Here is what I suggest, study each company found in this link: Trucking Company Reviews

Identify any company that road-trains (aka: mentoring or finish training), will hire entry level drivers and accepts 2 DUI's as part of their hiring policy. Like Rainy said, be careful how applications are worded; only provide exactly what is asked for, noting more and nothing less.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Joe, wrote:

I do have a certificate but it is for 80-hour refresher. When I contacted the school, in the beginning, I told them I had driven for a while for Schlumberger in 2008. Went to their two-week school even. Wasn't a whole lot of driving but the head of the school said a refresher would be good. Now it seems to be a problem, at least for Werner.

double-quotes-start.png

Joe DUIs are considered very differently by trucking companies, and for good reason. As per Rainy's comprehensive reply (please read what she suggested especially pertaining to filling out applications, very important), each company has their own policy for DUIs. Contrary to Werner's explanation or your understanding of it, they have a lifetime limit of 1 DUI. With 2 no matter how old or why, you are disqualified because of Werner's hiring policy. This is perhaps the reason you were sent home. That's the hard truth.

3 weeks of schooling vs. 5 weeks of school; not exactly true. Any reputable school will provide you a certificate proving successful completion of the minimum required 160 hours of instruction. This certificate, plus the valid CDL pre-qualifies you for most all carriers hiring newbies. Without it, any reputable company will not be able to hire you; their insurance will not cover you. That said, all of the trucking companies offering Paid CDL Training Programs are about 3-3.5 weeks duration of instruction necessary to pass the CDL tests. Do you have any training certificate from the school you graduated from? If not, you will likely need to repeat this step to satisfy insurance requirements of a prospective employer.

Here is what I suggest, study each company found in this link: Trucking Company Reviews

Identify any company that road-trains (aka: mentoring or finish training), will hire entry level drivers and accepts 2 DUI's as part of their hiring policy. Like Rainy said, be careful how applications are worded; only provide exactly what is asked for, noting more and nothing less.

Good luck.

double-quotes-end.png

Geez Joe...

Private Schools will take your money. They are in no position to make hiring decisions for any trucking company, let alone Werner. NO idea why the school offered that as an acceptable minimum, it's not for possibly two reasons. If you have less than 1 year of continuous experience with Schlumberger most reputable companies will want the full 160 hours of training. Even so, your experience is very dated, 10 years. Trucking companies are risk averse and most likely none of them will hire you with only a two-week refresher. Short-cuts usually amount to frustration. I still think part of Werner's issue is the 2 DUIs and they used the 80 hour refresher as an easier, less contentious explanation. Regardless, "it is what it is".

Do yourself a big favor, focus on the best solution to your situation, re: the suggestion and information links I sent you. Based on what we know about you so far; consider going the route of Paid CDL Training Programs offered by any carrier that will accept 2 DUIs. Let them determine how best to proceed based on your CMV driving experience.

Use this link to apply: Apply For Paid CDL Training

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Key City's Comment
member avatar

I just got off the phone with Werner. They do not like the fact that I did not submit to a breathalyzer over 11 years ago when I was 20. I did not receive a DUI but my lisence was suspended for 6 months due to Zero Tolerence.

They said they will call me back my last week of CDL school with a final decision. She made it pretty clear without saying, that I won’t be able to go to an orientation because of this BAC Refusal. It is what it is.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Key City wrote:

I just got off the phone with Werner. They do not like the fact that I did not submit to a breathalyzer over 11 years ago when I was 20. I did not receive a DUI but my lisence was suspended for 6 months due to Zero Tolerence.

They said they will call me back my last week of CDL school with a final decision. She made it pretty clear without saying, that I won’t be able to go to an orientation because of this BAC Refusal. It is what it is.

Refusing a drug or alcohol test, in the eyes ANY trucking companies carries the same negative weight as a DUI conviction. This is not a Werner issue...! The companies are looking for the best qualified candidates. The competitive culture of truck driving starts at the point of pre-qualifying and escalates from that point forward.

Contrary to the commonly accepted belief: "there is a shortage of truck drivers", the truth is; "there is a shortage of qualified truck drivers".

Key City, "Werner" is not the only game in town. Many times the level of 'more or less" scrutiny in the selection process is a timing thing. In 3 months, Werner might paint a different picture. Cast a wider net. You will get offers. 11 years is long enough that one of the "megas" will give you a solid chance.

Recall Rainy's point earlier in this thread; every company will consider DUI differently and even though Werner will accept a lifetime limit of one, they still have the right of refusal if after careful consideration, they believe there is an elevated risk. It's not discrimination...condition of hire for any company/industry that affects public safety.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More