Sway Me To Cdl Training Company With Lease Afyer Completion

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CHICOFILFL's Comment
member avatar

I've narrowed it to roehl Vs prime but want first hand input on it. I've done a lot of reading prime and really leaning that way because I've got the chance to run with a lease op in training. I'd like to be able to learn some before jumping in head first.

Any other companies that are recommended would be great. Also thanks for all the great reviews and such from everyone.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Hello

Everyone is going to tell you NOT to lease...especially for a new driver....DONT DO IT....get used to this response, cause it will be coming hot and heavy.

Best of luck

CHICOFILFL's Comment
member avatar

Hello

Everyone is going to tell you NOT to lease...especially for a new driver....DONT DO IT....get used to this response, cause it will be coming hot and heavy.

Best of luck

Hey I'm used to it. But I'm in the mindset it's mine for the taking. It all comes down to wanting to better myself. I make about the same as a company driver now and home everyday. I want something better and not mediocre

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Im at prime as a company driver and love it. there is a bit of a lease/company driver kind of standoff if you will within trucking itself.

i am here to tell ya...MOST of the reasons lease ops give at Prime for not wanting to be company are flat out lies and myths. most lease ops have never been compamy drivers so they have only the rumors they heard.

FACT: i make about the same solo as a solo lease op

FACT: Most lease ops team train because they have to not because they want to; new drivers cannot train so you cant even get out of the hole.

FACT: there are 2 reasons to lease which are that you can turn down loads and go home whenever you want

FACT: if you turn down loads you do not make money

FACT: i get more hometime than most lease ops

FACT: Most lease ops do not qualify for a mortgage because their legal income is not high enough. when you write off all expenses, it also reduces your reported income

FACT: I know.lease ops whose annual average load was $1.25 with .75cpm operation costs. that puts them at 50cpm....with my fuel bonus i make that and lightweight company drivers make more.

FACT: if i deviate from my routing no.one cares

FACT: Since thanksgiving i went home 20 days and took 4 off in the terminals My lease op boyfriend spent a total of 8 days including only 3 days at christmas.

FACT: no one tells me.where to park at the end of my day

FACT; i do what i want, i only need to ask.

FACT,: No one at prime.has ever inspected my truck (a rumor lease ops.believe is that prime will search your belongings every couple.montbs. lie.

i could go on and on. lease ops love showing you their big numbers and i fell for it too at first.

However...they dont tell you that they pay up to $6000 for just the truck and miles each momth. yep $1000 per week for the truck payment and 10% for miles. so.if you are team training that is $500 per week for miles then maintenance fund, insurance, fuel, the trainees pay and taxes, and so.mich more.

and they dont have health insurance.

i coukd go.on and on...but i have documented end of the year settlements from lease ops and i ha e my own as company.

totally not worth it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

CHICOFILFL's Comment
member avatar

Rainy I appreciate that response. My main reason for wanting lease op is learning how to operate my own truck in the future. I know operation cost are outrageous but for the knowledge it would be beneficial. I want to eventually own my own truck with no payment but to do that I need the knowledge of running my own truck. I'm not saying its a perfect plan but it's what sounds good to me. I want to be my own boss and not have to answer. Also the denying loads is sometimes a good thing if they are sending you to a bad location and will be down for days on end.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Then go company for a year. learn trucking and how to drive. live.on the truck if you can and save all.of that rent ,utilities etc money for start up costs which are astronimical.

whike driving the company truck, keep records of all the fuel and repair receipts. of all the hotel bills you will have during repairs. tow bills etc. then you will.have an idea of costs, plus your own salary.

going with a lease trainer is not going to be beneficial other than them bragging about how much they make, but few ever show you the bottom line.

and trust me when i tell you...you will have an accident..big or small..you will hit something and as a lease, you have deductibles. i have seen new lease ops roll trucks and lose everything because of the mounting debt.

you want to learn, you would have to know the freight lanes, but each company is different. the freight prices are different.

after a year, take over someone elses lease for six months or so. that will give you an idea. but saying you want to buy a truck is like a first year med student buying a building for his new practice. he needs to graduate and grow.

good luck

but prime is freaking awesome!!!

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

CHICOFILFL has it all figured out...

I want to be my own boss and not have to answer.

Even as an owner op, you will never be your own boss. You know who the real boss is? Your truck and your customers, that's who. You will always have to answer to your customers. Without them you have no truck. If you aren't rolling, who's paying your bills? Nobody.

I owned and ran my own business for 27 years, and I'm here to tell you that I was never the boss. My overhead, insurance, licenses, equipment, customers, and yes even my employees ultimately dictated how I had to conduct my operations.

Also the denying loads is sometimes a good thing if they are sending you to a bad location and will be down for days on end.

Do you really think a company is going to send you somewhere, just so you can sit for days? I think you've read too many horror stories. They don't make any money if your truck isn't rolling. They will do everything in their power to get you rolling asap. The LONGEST I've ever sat waiting for another load is maybe 3 hrs tops. 95% of the time I have a load waiting for me as soon as I empty.

Take everything Rainy said above as truth, it is 100% accurate. I've seen it. We've all seen it.

Of course we all wish you luck in whatever you do. But don't say you weren't warned.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Do not lease. Run the numbers intelligently and it's obvious it's a no win situation for the driver. The only one making out is the company. You are much better off to first figure out if driving is for you. Do that for a couple years, minimum, then save your money. Do you have any business experience?

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

BTW...not only do i NOT sit, ever...but i do not go places i do not want. My FM doesnt send me the loads of places i dont want.

for example...i am not going to NYC, Cincinatti breweries or Birmingham AL for fuel. so i never get sent those.

when lease ops talk about sitting for days it is cause they think the load is not worth it. For example loads into FL pay really well, but loads out suck. New lease ops do not realize this and reject load after load sitting for days thinking a higher paying one will come along. since i get paid CPM , it doesnt matter to me. send me in and out of FL week in and out lol

Do the year as a company driver and you will learn much more without the added pressure of responsibility.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

CHICOFILFL has it all figured out...

double-quotes-start.png

I want to be my own boss and not have to answer.

double-quotes-end.png

Even as an owner op, you will never be your own boss. You know who the real boss is? Your truck and your customers, that's who. You will always have to answer to your customers.

Turtle, i am.practically my own boss. Today i told my FM to get me a load to.the terminal to get my APU belt fixed. He the sends me a 2900 mile load from CA to NH that will be cut in half if i drop it in MO.

my next message was "Oh, Greedy One Kenobi, you attached a 3000 mile load to my truck and expect me to drop.it? can i just run it in then get the APU fixed in PA?"

he responded "ok"

almost everything i tell him is "10/4 thanks"

it is the best job in the world witbout the hassles.

rofl-3.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

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