The Need For Speed Can Hurt You - New Article By Rainy

Topic 22482 | Page 2

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Schmidtrock's Comment
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Thank you Rainy, another great article.

thank-you.gif

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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Excellent article. There is one argument which can be made though but it would also require companies to change the way they order their trucks. You mentioned your ideal fuel economy is at 1100 rpm. That number can be manipulated with the setup of the truck by upgrading to say a 13 or 18 speed and a taller highway gear such as a 3:08 or even down to a 2:93. I know of one such company using this approach and their trucks running long stretches at highway speed can match your fuel economy because they're running the same rpm at higher speeds. This particular company, the owner specifically really knows not only logistics but the mechanical aspects of the trucks and has intentionally built his trucks this way. A few hundred miles a week may not seem like much but on a grand scale, it equates to more loads and more revenue which is what every company is chasing. Again, I'm not being critical because your article is dead on in regards to the company you drive for and many others but there's more than one way to pinch those fuel penny's.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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That number can be manipulated with the setup of the truck by upgrading to say a 13 or 18 speed and a taller highway gear such as a 3:08 or even down to a 2:93. I know of one such company using this approach and their trucks running long stretches at highway speed can match your fuel economy because they're running the same rpm at higher speeds.

There are two main factors at work - the RPM at which the engine makes maximum torque, and wind resistance. Two trucks aren't going to get the same MPG at 1100 RPM's if one is facing more wind resistance because it's travelling at a higher speed.

Not to mention, every engineer and major company have known that stuff for 100 years. It's not like that company figured out something new. It's like middle school physics.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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I hate to argue with you Brett but the owner of Hurricane Express constantly publishes articles on why he sets his trucks up the way he does, the speeds they run at and their fuel economy. Now, Prime and a few others might get a few tenths better on fuel but if he's pulling extra loads and generating more revenue, it justifies the difference because the revenue will outweigh the fuel cost.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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What speeds do you think they're running that he's able to pull extra loads? It would have to be quite a considerable difference, like 80 mph+ and there's no way at those speeds his fuel mileage would only be a few tenths different. Not only that, but those speeds are only going to help for certain parts of the country.

If it was as simple as changing the gearing, cranking up the speeds, and raking in the dough don't you think everyone would be doing it? Come on, man.

Back in the day most trucks ran ungoverned. Today all of the largest, most successful companies out there govern their trucks at relatively low speeds. Trucking companies will do anything to scrape up a few extra bucks in revenues. Do you really think this guy has some great secret the largest, most successful companies out there never figured out with all of their collective intelligence over the past 50 years?

BTW, they seem to be a lease-only company. What does the owner care if they get good fuel mileage or not? He's basically a broker getting his cut of the freight revenues whether the trucks make any money or not. Advertise to people that your trucks are shinier and run faster than everyone else's and the drivers are making more money and every knucklehead who can't do simple math is going to come running.

I can't find any of his articles. Can you point me to one or two?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jason R.'s Comment
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62mph is really no different than say 65 or 68mph just 3-5 seconds a mile faster, what that means to me is I will be pulling in behind you after you clear the gate and are done checking in, meaning I get there not too far behind you and get the extra cash in my pocket.

Great article Rainy. I wish more people out there had the same mentality, would cause a lot less headaches in shippers, receivers, truck stops. The less you hurry the better off you are. The safer you are.

Getting a load from point A-B safely and efficiently is always a priority.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
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Great article. Here is my bone head move. Let me start off this mistake made me late in my comfort area, NOT for the appointment. I'll get there early. It will be less than an hour early which is late for me.

Yesterday I delivered my load one day early. As soon as I was in the door, I messaged dispatch that I was being unloaded and could they find me my next load. When I was empty, I went to the Love's two miles down the road. After waiting for several hours and with 3 hours left on my clock, I got a load. Excitedly I wrote down the info. The pick up was 2 1/2 hours away in KY. Found a place to sleep, reserved a spot and rolled. Got shut down at 18:45. Looked at my phone and it said 19:45.?!? Yup, in my haste, I didn't see that I was switching time zones and losing an hour. Now, I had read this article earlier that day. I get a super idiot award for that.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Great article. Here is my bone head move. Let me start off this mistake made me late in my comfort area, NOT for the appointment. I'll get there early. It will be less than an hour early which is late for me.

Yesterday I delivered my load one day early. As soon as I was in the door, I messaged dispatch that I was being unloaded and could they find me my next load. When I was empty, I went to the Love's two miles down the road. After waiting for several hours and with 3 hours left on my clock, I got a load. Excitedly I wrote down the info. The pick up was 2 1/2 hours away in KY. Found a place to sleep, reserved a spot and rolled. Got shut down at 18:45. Looked at my phone and it said 19:45.?!? Yup, in my haste, I didn't see that I was switching time zones and losing an hour. Now, I had read this article earlier that day. I get a super idiot award for that.

I did the exact same thing recently. One that left me feeling like an idiot too.

Got up that morning at 0300 to roll the few hours to 90 with over an hour cushion. As I was making my coffee I got a QC message from night dispatch-"mornin rich, u have 0800 appt. What's ur eta?"

Well, that kinda bugged me. I hear stories from other drivers on how their dispatchers message or call to wake them up telling them to roll. I never have to be told when to roll.

In my half-asleep state. I was bugged enough that I almost wrote back-"I'm never late. I'm not one of those drivers you have to worry about and wake up." But I thought better of it, and simply said eta 0700.

I hadn't been rolling long when I heard my GPS tell me i was entering a new time zone, and it dawned on me.

SOB!! DUH!! I was so upset with myself for making such an dumb mistake. But luckily I had given myself that cushion too, so I made it to 90 with a little time to spare. Too close for my comfort though.

This was only like a month ago. So yeah Big Scott I'm right there with ya on the idiot move. Lol

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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