Truck GPS Vs Qualcom Navigation

Topic 22610 | Page 1

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Voyager's Comment
member avatar

I had the privilege of using the qualcomm mcp200 and the omnitracs mcp50 navigation application. is there really a huge benefit of purchasing a truck gps, such as the ones from Rand Mcnally? Or is the qualcomm navigation just as good? Any input would be appreciated.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Use every possible tool available to you. A Rand Mcnally atlas, should be the first thing you buy. After that, a Rand GPS, or a Garmin. Personally, I use an app called Co-Pilot Truck, on my phone. The GPS program we use at Don Hummer, is Co-Pilot 9. Navistar, I think, is the primary gps program that companies put on their devices. But definitely grab an atlas.

Voyager's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, i gotta really stop procrastinating and get one. Ive been using google maps to plot my course before driving. I work for Emerson Express and they use co pilot in there trucks aswell. But i see almost every driver there use a gps unit outside of the qualcomm. Kinda made me wonder if they route more effectively than the qualcomm.

Use every possible tool available to you. A Rand Mcnally atlas, should be the first thing you buy. After that, a Rand GPS, or a Garmin. Personally, I use an app called Co-Pilot Truck, on my phone. The GPS program we use at Don Hummer, is Co-Pilot 9. Navistar, I think, is the primary gps program that companies put on their devices. But definitely grab an atlas.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I like having my own GPS aside from the Qualcomm unit. Generally they will both route me the same way. But there have been times where they route me differently, and I like to compare the options.

My Rand also gives me many more options than the Qualcomm such as waypoints, points of interest, eta, and a multitude of other features.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah, i gotta really stop procrastinating and get one. Ive been using google maps to plot my course before driving. I work for Emerson Express and they use co pilot in there trucks aswell. But i see almost every driver there use a gps unit outside of the qualcomm. Kinda made me wonder if they route more effectively than the qualcomm.

double-quotes-start.png

Use every possible tool available to you. A Rand Mcnally atlas, should be the first thing you buy. After that, a Rand GPS, or a Garmin. Personally, I use an app called Co-Pilot Truck, on my phone. The GPS program we use at Don Hummer, is Co-Pilot 9. Navistar, I think, is the primary gps program that companies put on their devices. But definitely grab an atlas.

double-quotes-end.png

Our GPS has 4 profiles we can utilize, to best fit our routes. The default, is the shortest route possible. On my app, I have it default to the fastest route. From there, I add in the Via points, if any, and the fuel stops, for the route I finally input into the truck GPS.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

QC GPS does not have traffic updating & re-routing. That's common in many "better" truck GPSs. And that's worth it by itself!

I believe the company's QC/Omnitrac tends to shave miles, compared to time. I've seen the QC route me down a country 2-lane highway that was 11 miles shorter than taking a parallel interstate (and 11 miles at 45mph instead of 60mph).

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I compare the QC navigation with Truckerpath app navigation and the road atlas. I realize I may be behind the tech curve, but if I pay attention to the CB, the broadcast radio (when around major metro areas) I’m pretty successful without spending the bucks on a truck gps.

It works for me.

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Never ever rely on the QC/Omnitrac. That will shave miles and send you down roads not designed for a truck. Never blindly follow any electronic device. Look up the route and see where it is taking you, Use a Rand CMV Atlas and look up the route. When I was at werner their qualcom was notorious for routing you down the shortest narrowest road including residential neighborhoods and over bridges with restrictive weight limits.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Voyager's Comment
member avatar

i definitely learned that lesson when i was with swift, luckily i learned with my mentor in the truck and was able to help me get out of a sticky situation.

Never ever rely on the QC/Omnitrac. That will shave miles and send you down roads not designed for a truck. Never blindly follow any electronic device. Look up the route and see where it is taking you, Use a Rand CMV Atlas and look up the route. When I was at werner their qualcom was notorious for routing you down the shortest narrowest road including residential neighborhoods and over bridges with restrictive weight limits.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
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