When I Finish School...OTR Or Dedicated ??

Topic 22662 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
member avatar

Dan, those dollar store accounts are really tough gigs. We never recommend starting your career on those accounts. The physical labor is tough, and the backing scenarios are really bad.

We've discussed this subject a lot over the years. If you put dollar store in the search bar at the top of this page, you'll find a good many former discussions on the subject.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Dan, the reason they offer them to rookies is because they need butts in the seat. The injury rate on any physical unload gig is extremely high. For instance i received a message from our safety director today. It said that with 150 drivers we are at 60 days injury free. The terminal I run out of has been around for atleast 35 years and the "safety record" is 91 days injury free. Also there have been 5 incidents of hitting objects in parking lots, and 2 drivers took down power lines in the last week. I deliver to places that are tight like dollar accounts. The only benefit I have is I'm in a 28 'PUP, not a 53' like you would have.

Most experienced drivers that are willing to put in the work make the same, or more money by running OTR than they'd make physically unloading their trailer. If you end up doing that account I'd love to read a diary from you.

Thank you Rob, I appreciate it. I value the opinions here and pretty much had it in my mind that I shouldn't change my plan about OTR. I am interested to find out what the difference would be in pay for someone out longer than the normal 3 weeks out, 3 days home.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I am interested to find out what the difference would be in pay for someone out longer than the normal 3 weeks out, 3 days home.

Dan, productivity is what increases the pay out here. I know people who can go home every other week and make more than some guys who stay out for two months straight. If you don't really know how to keep yourself moving while you're out here you can be sitting around waiting a lot.

To be productive out here requires a mix of many proven practices and some street smarts. These are things you develop and learn as you get accustomed to this new lifestyle. Working OTR will help you gain the ability and the knowledge to make things happen in your favor out here. Here's a couple of articles that touch on this subject.

Show Me The Money

Drive Like You're The Boss

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Heres an idea..go to a few dollar stores and look at the parking lot and cars. there are some that wouls gice me a headache....so a fresh newbie?

run. dont walk, run lol

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Dan, I will add to the chorus of folks urging you to skip that dedicated dollar offer.

You sound like a guy that would likely enjoy long-term OTR , so why not give that a try first. If it turns out that you do enjoy staying out for extended periods, I think you'll earn just as much or more than the dedicated guys that go home a lot.

After you're OTR for a year, you'll have much more knowledge not only of driving but also of the industry, and you can then re-evaluate the type of routes and freight you want to haul and go from there.

Hey everyone, now in week 4 of school. My 90, parallel and offset are pretty right on for me as is shifting and double clutching. Should get out on the road this week. There was a large volume company recruiter who came out and gave his pitch. Seems like the OTR and dedicated were available to us rookies coming out of school. I planned on OTR and staying out many months at a time in the truck. Seems like the standard OTR is much lower pay than the dedicated (national account from Allentown, Pa. to southern Maine)...and I mean like 15K difference. Would staying out earn me much more generally, and should I even consider a dedicated ?

I'm not just in it for the money but that's quite a bit of difference. With that being said I am kind of on the down side of the mountain so I gotta git while the gitten's good !! lol What do you think ?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

JD's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Rob, I appreciate it. I value the opinions here and pretty much had it in my mind that I shouldn't change my plan about OTR. I am interested to find out what the difference would be in pay for someone out longer than the normal 3 weeks out, 3 days home.

Werner will have you with a trainer for 6 to 8 weeks. If you go with Werner ask for a trainer that is OTR would be my advice.

Stay away from dollar accounts until you are confident in your abilities

I usually run at least 6 weeks out and have done 15 weeks but don't recommend going that long but I do look at this as an adventure so to me attitude is a lot in being able to deal with this career I love it, not knowing where I'm going until I get a load assignment is kinda like "what's behind door number 3".

Good lucky and remember READ YOUR SIGNS!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Dan, those dollar store accounts are really tough gigs. We never recommend starting your career on those accounts. The physical labor is tough, and the backing scenarios are really bad.

We've discussed this subject a lot over the years. If you put dollar store in the search bar at the top of this page, you'll find a good many former discussions on the subject.

I took your advice and pulled the articles. I have to agree and I'm sure with my work ethic that the money won't be a problem. Just have to focus on learning how to be successful in the business. Thanks again for your honest advice. Dan

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Heres an idea..go to a few dollar stores and look at the parking lot and cars. there are some that wouls gice me a headache....so a fresh newbie?

run. dont walk, run lol

You guys would know Rainy. I'm now just a week or 2 from testing so I'm really looking forward to the process. Just have to get all my ducks in a row. Have to say that the Dollar stores around me in South Jersey don't look THAT bad for parking !!

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Dan, I will add to the chorus of folks urging you to skip that dedicated dollar offer.

You sound like a guy that would likely enjoy long-term OTR , so why not give that a try first. If it turns out that you do enjoy staying out for extended periods, I think you'll earn just as much or more than the dedicated guys that go home a lot.

After you're OTR for a year, you'll have much more knowledge not only of driving but also of the industry, and you can then re-evaluate the type of routes and freight you want to haul and go from there.

Thanks for the advice Dave. I really do think I will enjoy the OTR and I am looking forward to it. Just had PTL in to recruit and gives me another option to think about. I'm encouraged about the animal policy from some of these companies. Looks like Brutus might just be going on the road with the old man !!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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