Know Anything About Schneider ‘s ‘Jet-Set’ Bulk Division (Tanker)?

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Frank D. (Exit #4)'s Comment
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Butch, why would you want to Jet Set? You live in Atlanta where Schneider has an OC. You would be doing the same thing without the hassle of flying plus you wouldn't have to slip seat. You would have an assigned truck that you could set up with all your gear and you'll use Atlanta as your park location for home time.

Frank D. (Exit #4)'s Comment
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One other thing; it's not indentured servitude, it's an apprenticeship. Schneider has a lot of driving opportunities. You never know you might be able to land a home daily gig after you put some otr time in. They have day cab work out of there.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Dave Reid's Comment
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Personally, I would not want to slip-seat unless it was the only way I could get a home daily/frequently gig, and I wanted such an opportunity. Slip-seating OTR? No thank you - I would not have nearly all the stuff with me in the truck that I would want.

Tanker as a newbie? Not a good idea at all - most companies wouldn't offer it. Even though Schneider's training is excellent, I would not go straight into smooth-bore tanker driving. Much too dangerous. Please get at least a year in a van or flatbed before considering tanker.

Your listed residence is within 20 miles of a zillion trucking company terminals, including a Schneider van OC. You don't appear to need a jet-set gig, nor a slip-seat gig, so why deal with the hassle.

If you do really want a jet-set type of thing, there are companies that will offer that without requiring you to slip-seat. One of them is right down the street from you - Pride Transport. Drive six weeks or more and they'll fly you wherever, and bring you right back to the same truck filled with your stuff, freshly PM-ed. I am in that program now. Sometimes I take 'em up on the plane ticket, sometimes I go someplace that I can drive to.

From doing the flying thing, I can tell you it is a hassle under the best of circumstances, even in my case where I take nothing at all with me when I fly. Why? Because each time you're going to fly, you severaly limit the trips you can get the last few days before the flight, since you MUST be to the airport at an exact time/date, and then you lose two days of travel that you really can't enjoy as off days. So, I got to where I didn't do it unless I really had to. Now I'm back to needing to do it each time because I'm a trainer now and need to get students back to the terminal and then later myself back there for another student....if I drove where I want to take time off, it would take me too long to get there and back, time I wouldn't be able to have a student.

Anyway, if you give me a vote on what you are contemplating, I'd vote no....unless you really want that life/workstyle for reasons of your own, and unless you already have at least a year of experience.

I just got a job offer to join the Schneider National Bulk Division, as an OTR Tanker driver. Orientation starts June 25. It’s a unique position called Jet Set. Where I slip seat and fly into different locations every time I go back out.

Anyone doing this? I would like to get some pros and cons.

Thanks

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Moses R.'s Comment
member avatar

What is slip seat? I assume this is swapping a new truck day in and day out? Does this happen regularly for dry van OTR guys (and gals)?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

What is slip seat? I assume this is swapping a new truck day in and day out? Does this happen regularly for dry van OTR guys (and gals)?

you are correct. Slip seating is basically, sharing a truck. This does happen, on some accounts. But most otr isn't slip seat.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
CHOWSIR's Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the enthusiasm and passion in all the comments. I am use to climbing telephone poles and ladders, working in all kinds of weather conditions. I wanted a physical job like flatbed or tanker. It was what my plans were to begin with. Most companies, as stated, don’t let newbies start there. I’m thankful that Schneider has the program. I wish I lived in a hiring area that had a tanker division. My hopes are that the customer demands and customer growth will reach towards my home. I am taking the opportunity to start with tankers as very fortunate, and with a lot of respect, humility, and commitment to learning the safe way.

I can’t say enough how much your comments are helpful to me. Thanks to all!

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
I am taking the opportunity to start with tankers as very fortunate, and with a lot of respect, humility, and commitment to learning the safe way.

To be blunt, how naive'...

Look I know you believe what you say, but it's not enough. Remove the word "tanker" from your sentence and everything you wrote is still highly relevant, applicable and absolutely required to be successful running yes, even the lowly dry-van. You cannot "learn" or be "taught" the experience you really must have before commtting liquid tanker service. No shortcut or substitute for it.

If you reread what Dave Reid wrote, it wasn't so much as advice, more like a firm warning. I offered something very similar. Do you think we are making this up? Please tell us how any of the advice helped you, if you choose a path that's never recommended, consistently discouraged.

Every experienced driver in this forum without hesitation will recommend getting experience before going into tanker. You have no earthly idea how much more risk is involved with it.

Is it worth it?

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the enthusiasm and passion in all the comments. I am use to climbing telephone poles and ladders, working in all kinds of weather conditions. I wanted a physical job like flatbed or tanker. It was what my plans were to begin with. Most companies, as stated, don’t let newbies start there. I’m thankful that Schneider has the program. I wish I lived in a hiring area that had a tanker division. My hopes are that the customer demands and customer growth will reach towards my home. I am taking the opportunity to start with tankers as very fortunate, and with a lot of respect, humility, and commitment to learning the safe way.

I can’t say enough how much your comments are helpful to me. Thanks to all!

Enjoy learning how liquid moves in the mountains. I started pulling a tanker after two years of pulling a van. They aren't making things up. I routinely pick things up off the floor from where the surge knocked it off the shelves or the bed, I've even had to stand my refrigerator back up cause it was knocked over and laying up against the dash.

Your experience climbing telephone poles is irrelevant, I used to climb up the yard arms on destroyers but that hasn't really helped me navigate the mountains and the traffic while pulling liquid.

It seems like you've already decided so. Try not to roll it. I hear it looks pretty bad on a resume. And I hate sitting in traffic from accidents. (Happens all the time)

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