Know Anything About Schneider ‘s ‘Jet-Set’ Bulk Division (Tanker)?

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CHOWSIR's Comment
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I just got a job offer to join the Schneider National Bulk Division, as an OTR Tanker driver. Orientation starts June 25. It’s a unique position called Jet Set. Where I slip seat and fly into different locations every time I go back out.

Anyone doing this? I would like to get some pros and cons.

Thanks

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

First of all Grats on the offer; that's a "Pro" right there. Schneider? Great company; they know how to train and support new drivers. There is the second Pro. I know drivers, happy drivers with 10+ years of experience with Schneider. Because of their size, drivers have many options within the company.

Tanker for a rookie? We always suggest to get some experience with dryvan or reefer first. I'd look to some of the current tanker drivers on the forum for more input on this. If Schneider trains you on tanker from day one, then that's at least a plus. Not saying it can't be done, just realize you may have 4000 gallons of liquid sloshing around in a 6000 gallon, smooth bore tank. Lots of competing momentum in tanker operation. Finesse' is important, limiting events of extreme deceleration or cornering. It will push you through an intersection in the blink of an eye.

I slip-seat, so I can offer some experience with that. Pre-trip is doubly important. At least in my case I am familiar with all of our trucks used for skipseating. In your situation, you won't have that so go over your assigned truck with a fine tooth comb. Use your eyes and your ears. Tires and brakes are very critical; and where I start. If the tires are bad, it's reported and I move on to another truck. Also be prepared to do some house cleaning. There are a lot of slobs in this business, you may be cleaning up after. A container of anti-bacterial wipes, Windex, paper towels and scent-trees are a necessity. Wipe down all the touch points in the cab; especially the steering wheel and gear shift knob. You'll need to carry all of your driver tools; gloves, safety vest, flashlight, personal GPS (optional) and your Road Atlas. I have a small backpack for totting my "truck-stuff". It's a routine, part of the job.

The flying part. At least for me, not a Pro. I only know of one forum member who did this for a while, so not sure if anyone can offer first-hand experience. That said you'll need to find out how they handle the clock when you are flying and the inherent delays with air travel. Keep in mind if it's off-duty (considered a commute), you might need to hop in a truck and drive after a long, delayed flight. I flew over a million miles in my previous career; I could only catnap on flights. If you can sleep as you fly, that's great, definitely a Pro. Earplugs! Considering frequent flying delays, I'd ask how these issues are dealt with in this scenario. Put a list together and talk to a recruiter.

Definitely an interesting opportunity. Good luck!

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Frank D. (Exit #4)'s Comment
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I did jet set otr dry van , so I'll give some insight about what to expect. Basically it's recovery, although you might get lucky and get your truck at an OC. When you get to your truck, call your dbl and let them know you arrived. They want you to rest before you're available for dispatch. As far as flight delays, communicate with them and keep them posted. You will not have to get running as soon as you get to your truck. Pre-trip to the nth degree. Check stickers, insurance, registration, etc. Also, permit books. Every truck I drove had a wacked permit book some so bad, safety threw them in the trash. Clorox wipes, Windex, paper towels and air fresheners are a must. I was lucky that the trucks I recovered were in decent shape, and didn't need much to be legal. Couple of light bulbs, valve caps, and a mud flap. Keep all your receipts for baggage fees, cab fare, and anything you needed for the truck. You'll be limited to what you can carry on an airplane, so no coolers, coffee pots, etc. I found it better to stay out a month then come home for five days. Take pictures of any damage and send them to your dbl so you won't be held responsible. I'll start with the cons: flying it got old lugging my stuff from airport to cab to truck and vice versa. Slip seating could be a con, but I knew what the deal was and accepted it. Pros: You don't have to worry about where to park for home time. You'll be routed to the nearest OC to your fly location. In my case it was Atlanta then I flew to West Palm Beach Airport. Delta or Southwest. This is my take on Jet set, and hopefully this helps. Schneider is a good company to get your start in trucking. I no longer do it because my wife has some health issues that require me to be home. Good luck to you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Army 's Comment
member avatar

Hello,

This is a very interesting thread....so I will sound naive here, but companies have like in house recovery drivers? I guess I am surprised that, picking up deserted trucks could be a full time job. What am I missing lol....

Chris

Frank D. (Exit #4)'s Comment
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Some companies have in house recovery drivers. Some companies send their new hires to recover trucks and some companies send drivers out to do recoveries when their truck is in the shop for a long time. Trans Am does this. With Schneider's Jet Set fleet, it'll be hit or miss whether you get your truck at an OC or at some location like a truck stop, garage, or residence. It was 50/50 for me. Depending on the size of a company's fleet and turnover, it could be a full time job.

Frank D. (Exit #4)'s Comment
member avatar

Once you get your truck situated, you'll go pick up and deliver freight just like any other driver. Sometimes you'll bobtail and other times the truck will have a trailer. You won't be doing any accounts with the word Dollar in it. Only drivers in dedicated fleets do that. Don't complain about the 50 mile loads on weekends. They have sliding scale short haul pay and remember the dbls have loads that need to be moved, so just do it and just might get a long run. Here's an example: One weekend at the Charlotte OC, I moved trailers to and from Amazon. When that was done I took a load from Charlotte to Attleboro Mass., then went to Auburn Me. down to Knoxville, Tn.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Frank D. (Exit #4)'s Comment
member avatar

Schneider's Jet Set Fleet is for drivers that don't live in Schneider's hiring areas like Florida, Alaska, Maine, and remote areas outside their shipping lanes. Roehl had a similar program, but I don't think they're doing it anymore. Schneider has otr dry van , bulk/tank, intermodal , and WalMart dedicated for Jet Set Fleet.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Call_Me_Butch's Comment
member avatar

I’m starting with Schneider as a new graduate and am interested in folllowing this thread since I’m also interested in transferring to “Jet-Set” after my year of indentured servitude is up.

While I’m not a driver in that division, I AM a very frequent flyer and the best thing I’ve done for myself is become a TSA Pre-Check member. It costs $85 for an application screening (which might be reimbursed by Schneider) to use the Pre-Check lines at airports, which significantly expedites the security screening process. It is good for 5 years after your approved. Check out the details here: https://www.tsa.gov/precheck

Even if Schneider doesn’t reimburse you for it, then you should be able to write it off on your taxes as a business expense. Looking forward to hearing about your experience and best of luck!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Call-Me-Butch wrote:

I’m starting with Schneider as a new graduate and am interested in folllowing this thread since I’m also interested in transferring to “Jet-Set” after my year of indentured servitude is up.

Indentured servitude?

Call Me Curious; how so Butch?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Call_Me_Butch has an "interesting" attitude toward things. He said in another thread:

I did “interview” with them but they actually offered me a job as soon as I walked in the door. It was kind of off-putting how desperate they seemed to be for class A drivers.

So in one respect you'll consider yourself to be a "slave", but then again if someone really wants you to come work there you're put off by it? Talk about having to thread the needle.

Someone has been watching the wrong YouTube videos or reading "the other trucker's forum" I think.

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