Taking The Dog With You OTR

Topic 22711 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

I would love some advice and ideas from you guys about taking along the dog OTR. I see Brett's big Shepherd pics...my Brutus is one as well. How hard or easy is it ? Being able to keep him (he's not very friendly to strangers and nobody will take him) would be a positive thing for me but want to hear from those who know. Dan

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jodi 's Comment
member avatar

Hi dan. I have been trucking with my dog for about 2 years and it’s great. She forces me to get out of the truck for walks so we both get some much needed excersize. I usually look at google earth to if I plan to stay at a shipper/reciever to see if there is any grass to walk her on to go potty and if there’s a guard shack to check I will ask if I’m ok to get her out to potty and I have had no issues. She has got spoiled due to a lot of guards keep dog treats on there shack so now she thinks any time I talk to a guard it’s treat time. Keep a towel to clean your furry friend on the rainy days and I bought her a dog rain coat on Amazon. Keep in mind if your company has idle policies you may have to keep the air running for the dog when your away from your truck showering doing laundry things of the nature. Hope this helps.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi dan. I have been trucking with my dog for about 2 years and it’s great. She forces me to get out of the truck for walks so we both get some much needed excersize. I usually look at google earth to if I plan to stay at a shipper/reciever to see if there is any grass to walk her on to go potty and if there’s a guard shack to check I will ask if I’m ok to get her out to potty and I have had no issues. She has got spoiled due to a lot of guards keep dog treats on there shack so now she thinks any time I talk to a guard it’s treat time. Keep a towel to clean your furry friend on the rainy days and I bought her a dog rain coat on Amazon. Keep in mind if your company has idle policies you may have to keep the air running for the dog when your away from your truck showering doing laundry things of the nature. Hope this helps.

Very much helps. Although Brutus isn't a very friendly dog, he is mine. Aside from making it nearly impossible to consider team (which I wasn't anyway) I think I would be happy to have a little company going all over creation. And I guess he could be my built-in security system.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Jodi 's Comment
member avatar

Yes it does add a little sense of security having a dog with me. I generally don’t feel unsafe but having my dog who goes into flip out mode if she hears anything outside the truck helps. I like to think most people up to no good don’t want to mess with a upset dog.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

Almost all companies who offer a dog policy, will have restrictions on the size, and breed of dog that you can have with you.

I've had my dog with me for a while now and I love it. My biggest piece of advice, is please please please always have your dog on a leash. A few days ago I was walking my dog, and another dog came running around a trailer and came right to us. Luckily, neither my dog nor his were vicious, but it could have been a real problem. The other driver apologized and said he didn't know I was back there with my dog. But that's the whole point. You never know who might be around the corner.

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

Almost all companies who offer a dog policy, will have restrictions on the size, and breed of dog that you can have with you.

I've had my dog with me for a while now and I love it. My biggest piece of advice, is please please please always have your dog on a leash. A few days ago I was walking my dog, and another dog came running around a trailer and came right to us. Luckily, neither my dog nor his were vicious, but it could have been a real problem. The other driver apologized and said he didn't know I was back there with my dog. But that's the whole point. You never know who might be around the corner.

AMEN !! I have a pitbull that is very friendly, but protective. It seems everywhere I go there is always 1 ******* who thinks it's fine to let their dog off leash. I've started carrying mace. All it would take is one bite, and then my dog gets put down just because she's a pit.

Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Almost all companies who offer a dog policy, will have restrictions on the size, and breed of dog that you can have with you.

I've had my dog with me for a while now and I love it. My biggest piece of advice, is please please please always have your dog on a leash. A few days ago I was walking my dog, and another dog came running around a trailer and came right to us. Luckily, neither my dog nor his were vicious, but it could have been a real problem. The other driver apologized and said he didn't know I was back there with my dog. But that's the whole point. You never know who might be around the corner.

double-quotes-end.png

AMEN !! I have a pitbull that is very friendly, but protective. It seems everywhere I go there is always 1 ******* who thinks it's fine to let their dog off leash. I've started carrying mace. All it would take is one bite, and then my dog gets put down just because she's a pit.

My shepherd is not friendly and very protective. I always walk on leash but am just thinking of how much effort when you're concentrating while working a big rig. I love my Brutus but I want to excel at what I'm doing.

Thomas K.'s Comment
member avatar

The main thing I've been trying to think of is what breeds would probably lend themselves well to life in a truck. I'm a big fan of dogs and it's definitely a consideration for me when trying to get into the field. I've been in contact with somebody who breeds Kai Kens to see how they would deal with life on the road and I think if I end up staying in trucking for a good length of time, that's the route I'll be going.

I can't really speak on the distraction while driving portion of things. I think it's mostly going to be reliant on the kind of dog. Some don't take well to long trips. I wouldn't think being overprotective would necessarily be a bad thing unless you need to get your truck serviced. Otherwise I'd think it would be a blessing to have a grumpy ball of fur and fangs to ward off people you might not want around.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Just make sure your grumpy ball of fur and fangs is well disciplined. You truly want all bark and no bite.

Best example I can give is a Husky I used to own. When she was being protective or I told her to show me her "mean face" she would curl her lips back, bare her fangs, growl and work her mouth with her tongue. You would swear she was spawned from the depths of hell and about to rip you to pieces. Funny thing is, to show people they had nothing to fear, I would stick my hand in her mouth. She would literally spit my hand out and then give the most disgusted look ever. It was hilarious.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

The idea of taking the dog along with you is both good and bad. They will make great companions, won't talk back and never ask for much. On the other hand they require exercise and frequent "potty Breaks" that you will need to address. The extra cost of food, the obvious odor associated with just being in the cab and the extra care needed because of being mobile. I know that no matter the size of the dog they are an excellent guard feature as no one wants to bother you if you have a noisy dog barking if they are near your truck. You also gain the advantage of being allowed to idle the truck if you so desire because humane laws require that the pet must be kept comfortable even if the same law enforcement doesn't give a rat's behind about the driver. Go for it if you want and your company allows it but remember it will require some extra effort on your part.

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More