How NOT To Have A Good Looking Application...

Topic 22781 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Jrod's Comment
member avatar

So I get at least one application like this every day. Today, when I called (We promise to call and talk with anyone who fills out an application, even when its a rejection) to tell them we were considering candidates with stronger work histories, this driver got pretty rage-y. Raised their voice. I tried to recommend something else for them, but I was just another evil person who was out to ruin their life, and that was it.

This is exactly what was on the app they sent to me, and then they got mad when we wouldn't "just give me a chance!".

I wanted to say "Looks like a lot of places gave you a lot of chances, driver" But I didn't.

PS - I know my numbers are backwards, but I didn't feel like re-typing them all, sorry!

(All names and identifying features have been removed - but trust me when I say he went from decent companies to OK companies to companies I had never heard of to "3rd chance" companies...)

0981291001529696022.jpg

Now I'm not posting this to shame anyone, I'm just trying to show you what happens when you DON'T heed the free and valuable advice that the pros here at TruckingTruth offer you. This driver can't get out of a vicious cycle, and can't understand why this has happened to them.

Again, this is just a random choice, I see at least one of these apps per day. I don't have the answers, but trucking or not, its gonna be tough to find a company who will hire someone with a work history like this. And the companies that WILL hire someone with an app like this... they probably aren't going to be great or treat their drivers very well. Like I said - vicious cycle.

I have no way to verify this, but my guess is that these are the drivers who post the angry rants online about being mistreated by "X Trucking Company".

Dan M.'s Comment
member avatar

So I get at least one application like this every day.

This is exactly what was on the app they sent to me, and then they got mad when we wouldn't "just give me a chance!".

I wanted to say "Looks like a lot of places gave you a lot of chances, driver" But I didn't.

PS - I know my numbers are backwards, but I didn't feel like re-typing them all, sorry!

(All names and identifying features have been removed - but trust me when I say he went from decent companies to OK companies to companies I had never heard of to "3rd chance" companies...)

Wow...can't imagine filling out all the paperwork for all of them !

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Jrod, I'm super glad you posted this. I've said many times that there are plenty of drivers out there with many years of experience that never do figure out how to make their way in this industry, and you've given a perfect example of that.

I can understand that a rookie driver may not at first realize that it's not a matter of choosing the right company, but being an awesome driver. An awesome driver will get great miles and make great money at any major carrier. I specify "major carrier" because the majors are the ones with tons of freight and proven logistics systems in place. There's no question the opportunities for great miles are there at the major carriers. I can't guarantee that for small companies, like those with fewer than 50 trucks. There's no telling what experience you'll have at a small company.

It's astounding to me that there are so many drivers who never figure this out, even with many years of driving experience. It's a very simple concept - any large company has all of the opportunities in the world for great miles and great paychecks. If you're not getting these opportunities, then who is???

And why aren't you one of them???

Folks, I want you to understand something. When you want to be successful at something you need to seek out experienced professionals who have found happiness and success in their field and ask them what you can do to achieve the same.

Do not take career advice from people who are failing to perform or are unhappy with their situation. Do you think you'll find happiness and success by following the advice of people who are miserable and unsuccessful?

As amazing as it is that there are experienced drivers who never figure this industry out, it's just as amazing to me that so many people take career advice from them. If someone is miserable and failing, why would you listen to them?

If you want to understand why there is so much unwarranted negativity in trucking, and how you can handle it, check these out:

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

LoneStar's Comment
member avatar

I had a rough job history until I started following this site years ago. I have been slowly working on getting better. However, I did not have the same issues the driver did per say, but I had a rough time adjusting and finding my fit when I got out of the Army. I also worked 3 or 4 jobs at a time and discovered that this apparently looks bad to new employers as all they see is someone that worked 4 jobs in a year rather than someone working 4 jobs simultaneously while raising 2 kids and going to school. In my mind I thought "Man I look dedicated!" but that's not really how most companies see it apparently. I also am willing to admit a majority of my past issues were self inflicted.

It is surprising to hear how many applications you get though! And its wild seeing job history like this. I hope something clicks for this person! I was involved in a single vehicle rollover accident in 2016 in my personal vehicle with no tickets or citations issued and no property damaged and no one else involved except for myself and I had minor injuries. This was prior to having a CDL. How do companies look at this? I have some say no and some have said come back in a few years and then I have had some say they do not care. If it is an insurance thing how do they know without checking with their insurance? Some say safety has to clear me? I do not have to worry much right now as I thankfully have a job but I mainly just wanted to know how they determine these things?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Sometimes the COMPANY IS THE INSURER. It's called being self insured. Many companies who are willing to take on inexperienced drivers and give them a chance are indeed self insured completely or have an extremely high deductible, allowing them to be able to afford the risk of hiring/training inexperienced drivers.

For example, I work for a relatively smaller company (not a mega) with 550 trucks. We are self insured for the first $350,000. So yeah, you can bet Safety is going to be looking hard at every applicant and if they do decide to take a chance on them, they're going to be scouring their truck stats and driving until they've really proven themselves. I'm betting even larger carriers might be fully self insured? Swift? Etc?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Start date - Dec 17 End date - Dec 17 Reason: Too long of a commute

rofl-3.gif

Jrod's Comment
member avatar

I was involved in a single vehicle rollover accident in 2016 in my personal vehicle with no tickets or citations issued and no property damaged and no one else involved except for myself and I had minor injuries. This was prior to having a CDL. How do companies look at this? I have some say no and some have said come back in a few years and then I have had some say they do not care. If it is an insurance thing how do they know without checking with their insurance? Some say safety has to clear me? I do not have to worry much right now as I thankfully have a job but I mainly just wanted to know how they determine these things?

If it was deemed a "preventable" accident by your company, it's not going to be great. Failure to maintain lane of travel, Leaving the roadway, having a tow away accident (Or needing a wrecker to get it upright), and a DOT reportable accident with injuries (yourself included) doesn't get most insurance companies really excited. If there is a ticket included, its probably going to be a 3 year disqualifier for many places. No matter what, I would highly recommend having a copy of the accident report available for any potential employer to inspect. (that goes for any accident, always get and keep a copy of the accident report, and dash cam video if there is any. Otherwise, the company you were driving for will have 100% of the narrative for all future employers going forward.) Of course, there are a lot of companies out there that get to use their own judgement. Rarely is any single incident going to be enough to make a driver "un-hireable". You'll find a decent job out there, just make sure you're honest with yourself, figure out WHY your accident happened, and work really hard at making sure that never happens again. I know, you know, everyone knows - accidents happen. But... I also look at applications daily where you have OTR drivers with 10+ years of no accidents, no moving violations, etc - it is possible. They are driving down the same interstates, with the same trailers, surrounded by the same idiots... You can do it too!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Thomas K.'s Comment
member avatar

I had a rough job history until I started following this site years ago. I have been slowly working on getting better. However, I did not have the same issues the driver did per say, but I had a rough time adjusting and finding my fit when I got out of the Army. I also worked 3 or 4 jobs at a time and discovered that this apparently looks bad to new employers as all they see is someone that worked 4 jobs in a year rather than someone working 4 jobs simultaneously while raising 2 kids and going to school. In my mind I thought "Man I look dedicated!" but that's not really how most companies see it apparently. I also am willing to admit a majority of my past issues were self inflicted.

I'm in a bit of the same predicament as far as job history goes. Three jobs in three years and part of that is having been unemployed for 7 months while doing whatever under the table work I can find to pay bills as well as contracting gigs.

It hasn't made it any easier trying to get into a paid CDL training course since when most of them see that, they reject it on the spot. I can't say I blame them since, while I have reasons for all of it, my resume reads like I'm a job hopper.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Wilbur C.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I had a rough job history until I started following this site years ago. I have been slowly working on getting better. However, I did not have the same issues the driver did per say, but I had a rough time adjusting and finding my fit when I got out of the Army. I also worked 3 or 4 jobs at a time and discovered that this apparently looks bad to new employers as all they see is someone that worked 4 jobs in a year rather than someone working 4 jobs simultaneously while raising 2 kids and going to school. In my mind I thought "Man I look dedicated!" but that's not really how most companies see it apparently. I also am willing to admit a majority of my past issues were self inflicted.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm in a bit of the same predicament as far as job history goes. Three jobs in three years and part of that is having been unemployed for 7 months while doing whatever under the table work I can find to pay bills as well as contracting gigs.

It hasn't made it any easier trying to get into a paid CDL training course since when most of them see that, they reject it on the spot. I can't say I blame them since, while I have reasons for all of it, my resume reads like I'm a job hopper.

I am in the same boat. Two jobs in the last three years. The first job did everyone dirty. Walked in just to be told we were all let go. In the interim I applied at anything I could get so I wouldn't lose my car.Nothing.

With all my savings in the bank getting low and no work to be found I tried unemployment to be told that I quit. I found out the company president split.I lost my car.Eight months later I was taking the bus to work. Another eight months this company was fined for not having security guards with current registrations. Laid off again. Been a year now.

I can't take jobs that are only 16 to 20 hours a week at minimum wage and live let alone survive off of. So....this fall I return to school for a year. After that I'll work two more years then apply to some trucking companies.

Doing what I need to so I can become a driver and enjoy a career that I can take pride in.

What I like about trucking is, YOU...not anyone else makes or brakes it. You are the one that "owns it."It all falls on your shoulders. I am an over achiever and have been at all my jobs and have always been promoted.

I know I'll do well. Just need to take the steps to get there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jason R.'s Comment
member avatar

JRod, I am glad too see this on here, if it were not for this site and everyone on here, I wouldn’t be the driver I am today. Its good to see the other side of the spectrum from the personnel side of things. Gives insight into the selection process, seems like the same old excuse.

I am not one to judge, I am the person who understands the most. I had a rocky first few years partly because of my wife having cancer x2 and beating it, and because I was a knucklehead and kept trying to improve my paycheck status and home time, however if it were not for learning and applying what I have learned on here, I wouldn’t be what people call a top tier trucker.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More