Communication, Consistency, And Commitment

Topic 22827 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

I know it has been covered heavily here on what it takes to be a top tier driver at your company or wherever you go. I am not trying to claim that as I am still a rook out here however, I'd like to show you all who are either thinking about trucking or just getting started with your career, what it takes to turn the miles and an example of what loads look like for a great couple of weeks. Everything you will read are experiences of mine and may differ from others but nonetheless...

Communication is the biggest key in all of what we do. Let your DM or FM know when you will be where you will be. This works to your advantage as well as the company's. It gives the load planners a better idea of when to find your next load. You may sit for a while at first even after having sent and met your ETA but dont get frustrated. Either freight is slow or you haven't proven yourself enough yet for the planners to book your next load before you are empty. You will know when you've earned their trust, it takes time.

Consistency is paramount. You either run hard or you dont. There is no Inbetween. The drivers out here that run hard are highly motivated, detail oriented, and obsessed with their own performance. You will find yourself upset that you "only" ran 2900 miles for the week when you know you can run 3500. Now, though, is not the time to complain to your DM. You are proving yourself and earning the load planners trust.

Commitment will set you apart. Think of it this way, how would your marriage be without commitment? Or your relationship with your S.O.? The point is you are part of a team and if you are not committed to the other party and the overall goal (which is delivering the freight on time or early and damage free) then you cannot expect them to be committed to you. Run days, run nights, splits, recaps, or whatever you have to do to get the load there on time. If the load has plenty of time on it then run even harder and get it there early if possible. You are showing your commitment to the company by doing so and you will be rewarded.

Be safe. I cant elaborate on this. There is a safety department in every company. If you cannot operate a CMV safely, you put others at risk. The end.

With all of that said I will leave you with this quote by a source unknown, "you can say anything to anybody, it's not what you say but how you say it." You will find yourself frustrated early in your career and you will have a lot of alone time to think of ridiculous ways you would be better off at some other company, for any number of reasons. This goes back to communication, your DM or FM will never know you are unhappy if you dont tell them. Do it professionally and with tact.

I've been on the road now since November of last year, not long I know, and I have averaged just under 3000 miles a week. I have also averaged over 1000 net a week which includes hometime where I earn zero dollars. I am not plugging my company, you can do this with any company in your first year. It's not hard, it's just hard work.

Below you will see examples of what your load assignments will look like for a couple of good weeks. I'll see if I can crop the settlement for last week as well. Goodluck to you all and be safe.

0577531001530323999.jpg0158083001530324036.jpg0960218001530324071.jpg0799101001530324126.jpg0412793001530324142.jpg

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

0577163001530327471.jpg

I shower every day lol. Those were just showers I had to pay for because I didn't have shower credits at the time or I was at a mom and pop which we do not fuel at. Obviously i was reimbursed for said showers which i appreciate because i know not every company reimburses shower expenses. I very rarely miss a shower but on the days i do i am usually too tired to give a care.

0188752001530327487.jpg

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Great Stuff Juicebox!

It looks like you're doing real well out here.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Old School! I am trying and my efforts have not been going unnoticed. This November I will get a .05 cpm raise which puts me at .50 cpm. This is definitely a rewarding career if gone about the right way.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

Awesome topic!

I notice that some of the more successful drivers with my company, when asked for one important piece of advice, will almost always list communication at the top of their list.

"When you stop for a break or for the night, send a macro. As soon as you pick-up, deliver, relay, whatever - send a macro. Running late because of construction, etc., send a macro. Keep the office (usually your DM) informed of your whereabouts and what's going on at all times!"

It seems the more you keep in touch, the better your DM can do their job - which is to keep your wagon full and headed somewhere.

I've also noticed that my current trainer has a habit of staying in touch with the DM. He does well when we hit a hiccup somewhere. He calls our DM right away. But he doesn't open with a fantastic story about how traffic was stopped for 12 hours because comic book heroes were fighting in the street, etc. Instead, first thing he says is, "Sorry, I messed up and didn't leave enough time for this traffic jam we hit. We're gonna be two hours late."

Not that we've been late more than twice in the last few weeks, and those were both due to rare and strangely justifiable circumstances. But... He called right away and immediately took ownership for the delay.

There are other people in this company who are rogues and rebels and will not be stuck on some DM's leash! They do the job and that's all that matters. This company sucks anyway, so why should they check in every 5 minutes like they're kids or something?!?!

Yeah, cant imagine why the company sucks for them. But I bet, with that attitude, just about any company would suck for them.

I've learned from great examples that communication is a huge factor in one's success.

And I'm so grateful to see it covered here again. It's something I can't tell many people about because I'm still riding with a trainer. But when someone who is crushing it out there (obviously with good reason for that) says it, I pay attention - and hope everyone else does, too!

Thanks for an awesome post, JuiceBox!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Jeremy, something I forgot to list was positive attitude. You definitely have that from everything I have read. You will be crushing it out here too in no time. Thanks for your reply!

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Juicebox

Great post. I like the disclaimer at the end of the first paragraph lol....make me chuckle.

Chris

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Juicebox

Great post. I like the disclaimer at the end of the first paragraph lol....make me chuckle.

Chris

Thanks and yes it was a must. I have seen firsthand the vastly different experiences drivers have within the same company. We all know what that comes back to though.

Bran009's Comment
member avatar

Awesome !

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More