Need Advice...

Topic 22871 | Page 1

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NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Some of y'all know me. Most of y'all don't. I'm brand new in the field. Ive been on the road since March. Need some help.....

Here's the scenario:

I was heading north on route 85 near crestview,Fl. It was raining moderately hard but not too bad. Speed limit here is 65. I was going 50 due to low visibility and wet roads. People are flying all around me not a care in the world. So I'm just watching the road and off in the distance I see brake lights so I tap the brakes. Get a little closer I realize everyone is dead stopped. (Minor heart attack) so now I'm like 150-200 yards away doing 45 or 40. Push the brakes a little harder this time.....starting to jacknife (major heart attack) I let off the brakes and found the shoulder real quick. Was able to get it stopped but my question is what did I do wrong??? I feel like if I was traveling any slower I would be impeding traffic...I was paying attention and thought I had plenty of time just couldn't get the damn thing to grab the ashphalt. Anyways...help appreciated from some veterans.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

I'm not experienced but I'd think your load had something to do with that. Were you heavy, light, or empty? Maybe you hit the brakes harder than you thought? I'm sure somebody else can offer more than me.

Last winter I started to jack knife on ice when I was empty. I hit the accelerator a bit too much and started to get sideways. I corrected it and continued on at 15-20mph to the nearest truck stop and shut down until roads improved. I realize that ice and rain are completely different but, I always take it easy in those conditions and especially when I am empty or very light.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I am glad you managed to keep it upright and out of a 4-wheelers backyard.

In the rain if you see a progressive line of brake lights in the distance shut it down much quicker and put your four-ways on to protect your rear. Err on the side of caution. Hyper-vigilant during inclement weather. Always be prepared to not only slow down, but stop.

I use Google Maps so I can see a significant back-up well in advance of needing to make an emergency stop like you did.

Learning experience.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I agree with G-Town.

You said this...

I'm just watching the road and off in the distance I see brake lights so I tap the brakes. Get a little closer I realize everyone is dead stopped. (Minor heart attack) so now I'm like 150-200 yards away doing 45 or 40.

When you decided to tap the brakes is when you should have started slowing down and thrown on your four ways. Your vision is compromised due to the weather, and you need to just start slowing way down until you can make out what exactly is happening up ahead. Those people flying by you can stop a whole lot quicker than you can in that rig. You will learn from this experience and probably others, that sufficient following distance for the circumstances you are in will be a lifesaver. There is no more important safety practice than keeping a proper following distance in my opinion. Both your vision and your grip on the road were compromised due to the rain. Just slow it down and go through something like that at a very slow pace. Don't ever let what the cars around you are doing dictate how you should be driving.

I'm glad to hear you handled it safely, but that could have been a real disaster, as I'm sure you realize. Yeah, just shut it down and get going real slow until you can be comfortable you know what is going on up ahead.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Thanks y'all I guess next time I'll just assume the worst up ahead and play it safe.....

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