Old Questions Young Guy

Topic 22903 | Page 1

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Brett V.'s Comment
member avatar

What’s up everyone, I’m Brett. Few question for you all.. I’m 21 and my wife is 33 she has two kids. I’m seriously considering getting into trucking simply for the money and the joy of being a driver. Two big issues and two big questions. My wife will not be okay with me OTR. And she doesn’t want me to go away for 8 weeks to get my cdl.

so I did my research and I found XPO LTL student driver within range of me. I got an interview tomorrow. Question 1; is this really local.. she want me home nightly. Bare minimum.. i read all this things about 1 yr exp for local and all that Jazz. True? Or not true?

Question 2; is it worth it to get into this right now

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

Go for the interview. If it is not what you want, tell them thank you for your time and leave. You are under no obligation at an interview. Ask all the questions you want and listen carefully to the answers and weigh your options. Welcome to the world of trucking.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Starting local isnt the best option. You simply lack the skills necessary to get into some of the places youll be required to bump all day every day. I started in local foodservice and have been fortunate to not hit anything in my 10 short months. Ive had quite a few close calls. Numerous accidents in a short time will kill your career. Although im home every day im usually only off work for my 10 hour mandatory break. In that time i have to commute, shower, eat, sleep and TRY to fit time in to spend with the family. Im getting 60+ hours on average in a 5 day week. I only chose the route i did because i had a mandatory 12 week training period. Id for sure ask how long of training you'll have with a trainer next to you while you do all the driving.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

That may be what is commonly called a dock to driver program. Many local companies offer them. In these positions you work on the dock while they train you to drive. Once you get your CDL they send you out with a trainer. You may have to do line haul for a while. With line haul you go out and back, usually in the same day. There is a lot of competition for a few positions. You and your wife need to discuss this more. Why doesn't she want you away for long periods of time? We highly recommend Paid CDL Training Programs With these programs you are paid while you train and are required to work a contract, usually one year. Companies like Swift and Schneider are two of many companies who offer paid training. These are two mega carriers with OTR , regional , dedicated and local positions. These give you several divisions as options within the same company. You should be looking for a career and not a job. OTR trucking is a lifestyle. Trucking is a great career choice. With a CDL, experience and a good safety record, you could always find work.

As I said earlier you need to discuss this more with your wife. This is a huge decision and you are part of a team now. Read through our starter package and share all this information with her.

Then read this article about Relationships on the road. You have a long way to go and a ton of info to digest. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Brett V.'s Comment
member avatar

@bigscott My biggest problem (and my wife’s) with OTR , my wife has two kids of her own, and being away from them she won’t be able to handle it. Me and my wife are very very close knit. I considered OTR and stuff but she was not going for it, and it started putting doubt in my head. We’ve only been married a few months don’t want to lose that she’s a keeper haha. Also I am looking for a career, this is where I plan to plant my feet in the ground. A CDL will open hundreds of doors for me, and it’s not even just that part.. My dad was a trucker for 30+ years, this is in my blood.. Also they offered me the job! They want me to drug test tomorrow, thank you all for the help and guidance time to hit the grindstone!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

Back in my day of starting to drive, around 1969, most companies would not hire you for the OTR positions but let you earn your experience in the "city". I lived in NJ all my early years and I started by leaving Trenton, NJ and "peddle" runs to either Phila. or North Jersey for 6-8 months. Then the Friday after I turned 21 with my 6 mos. experience, dispatch says "here, be in McCook Ne. Monday morning @ 0700." Today is altogether very different than almost 50 years ago but someone with a positive attitude, good practice skills and the proper training it shouldn't matter where you take an expensive piece of company equipment to. Go for the XPO job because a lot of senior drivers with company seniority will take the linehaul runs because their is less work and more pay involved. You won't regret it and if they offered you the job already say thank you with a firm handshake and a smile. Good luck.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Army 's Comment
member avatar

Brett

Welcome. I hope to not sound like an a** but if I read your last post correctly, you are recently married, and she has 2 children prior to you? You say that if you are not around to help she, she can't take care of her own kids? If OTR driving is something you want to do, then you should relook your personal side of things. I know people that blame others for "holding them back" and it ends up ruining there marriage.

Sounds like even if you try OTR between training and after, you will have to many distractions, which might cause you not to be successful.

I wish you the best Chris

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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