Danny Herman Trucking

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Adrian N.'s Comment
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I am all set to go to Danny Hermans orientation August 13th. I'm really hoping to earn enough to take care of my 2 kids, and enough so my wife won't have to work so she can just concentrate on getting through the next year of nursing school. I'm hoping I'm making the right choice by going with them? It will be a great sacrifice to be away from home so much but it's one I'm willing to make it it creates a better future for my family. Everything I've read in DHT has been mainly positive. They seem like they will be a great company! I've seen their trucks and they are really nice! I'm just trying to get all the information I can on the company. Anyone here work for them or use to? Anyone hear anything about them? I'd appreciate any information you have to offer. Than you.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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I have spoken with a few of their drivers. They seem to really like it. I have only heard good things about them. Good luck!

Old School's Comment
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Adrian, welcome to our forum!

Your tag line says you're an experienced driver. I'm just curious why you're leaving your current company. Who are you working for now? What's the motivation to move elsewhere?

Adrian N.'s Comment
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Well my story is I started driving in 2001. I did a year and a half OTR with Swift and then 6 months with CFI. My wife at that time wanted me to be home more so I found a local job driving a concrete mixer. Did that for 6 years. Then did local p&d work with class b trucks until 2016 when I got a job driving a city bus and did that for almost 2 years. I realized recently just how much I missed driving big rigs and decided to get back into trucking. It was hard finding a trucking job because the last time I drove a big rig was back in 2003 but I finally found an outfit that would give me a chance. I've been happy at my current job. I drive in NM, AZ, and TX and except for 1 night a week I'm home every night. It feels so good to be driving a big rig again!I don't get paid much an hour but I get lots of overtime. My wife is finishing up her first semester of nursing school and working. It's been really hard for her trying to work and go to school. It's been really hard on her so I want to find a job where I can support the family and let her focus on school. I've been trying to find a local gig that pays more, and there's lots of them but they all want a year of recent experience. My experience from 2001-2003 no longer counts. All those years of driving class b vehicles don't count. I've been at my current job 3 months driving class A vehicles so it like I only have 3 months experience. I thought about working the oilfields and had a lot of job offers but I'm afraid I would be miserable and wouldn't last long. I've really got bit by the trucking bug again with my current job and love driving. I figured I would go OTR again and hopefully make enough to be the sole provider for my family. I was accepted by Danny Herman and after a 2 week refresher with a trainer I'll be on my own. They really seemed to have the most to offer considering I'm now considered a rookie again. I have heard a lot of good things about them and look forward to working for them. It will be hard being away from my wife and kids but if it enables my wife to get through nursing school our lives will be so much better in the long run! Plus if I spend the next year with Danny it will greatly improve my trucking career. I'll be able to get one of these high paying local gigs like with Old Dominion. Sorry this was such a long winded reply!

Adrian, welcome to our forum!

Your tag line says you're an experienced driver. I'm just curious why you're leaving your current company. Who are you working for now? What's the motivation to move elsewhere?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Adrian N.'s Comment
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Pretty much everything I've read has been positive too. That's unusual for a trucking company! Mainly seems when it comes to trucking companies you mainly hear a lot of bad! I just thought I'd post here and see what people have to say. You can never have too much information about such an important decision. I'm excited but scared too. I have 3 great people depending on me to make this work. I would hate to quit my current job only to get sent home during orientation for some unforseen reason. That's my biggest fear! To be jobless with a family to take care of! Danny Herman seems like a great place to work and I'm hoping for the best! I'm pretty impressed that are going to rent me a car to get down down to El Paso and for the 3 days I'll be in orientation. Most stick you Greyhound.

I have spoken with a few of their drivers. They seem to really like it. I have only heard good things about them. Good luck!

Adrian N.'s Comment
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I'm new to this forum so I need to ask. Is there a way to edit your posts? I was reading what I wrote and see a bunch if errors I'd like to correct but can figure out how to.

Simon D. (Grandpa)'s Comment
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I'm new to this forum so I need to ask. Is there a way to edit your posts? I was reading what I wrote and see a bunch if errors I'd like to correct but can figure out how to.

No.....

However, you can push the 'create preview' button before you submit your post....that way you see exactly how your writing is going to appear. Then you can make any edits, preview again and submit! 👍

Best of luck with your future plans...sounds like you've got it worked out. 😊

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Old School's Comment
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Adrian, almost everybody puts way too much thought into whether the company they're going to work for is "good" or "bad." You mentioned several times how most of what you've read about Danny Herman wasn't bad. Here's just one example...

Pretty much everything I've read has been positive too. That's unusual for a trucking company! Mainly seems when it comes to trucking companies you mainly hear a lot of bad!

We don't put much stock in that form of evaluation. The truth in trucking is that a lot of people try to make a go of it and never catch on to the ways it takes to be successful at it. They fall flat on their face, and then go straight to the internet to rage about how bad the company was.

It doesn't really matter what company you go with, basically they're all trucking companies and they all are moving a lot of freight. There's no such thing as a trucking company that doesn't have plenty of freight - they would cease to be a company fast if that were the case. You can be successful at Danny Herman the same way you'd be successful at any trucking company. It always boils down to the driver's performance.

I don't have the time right now to lay it all out, but take the time to read these four articles. They should help you get the right idea about how to approach this whole thing.

What It Takes

Trucking Is A Competition

Do I Have What It Takes?

Show Me The Money!

Brett Aquila's Comment
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You can be successful at Danny Herman the same way you'd be successful at any trucking company. It always boils down to the driver's performance.

If I had to boil down our philosophy and our approach here at Trucking Truth to one statement, that would be it. That is the essence of what we teach. If you read through our forum and our articles you'll find that maybe 5% of our materials focus on helping you choose a company that matches your needs well, and at least 95% of it focuses on teaching you what it takes to be a Top Tier Driver.

None of it will make reference to "bad companies".

Look at the moderators and experienced drivers here in our forum and almost all of them work for different companies, yet they're all making top wage and very happy with where they work.

When I hear a driver give a review about a major company with a long track record of success, I don't consider that a review of the company at all. I consider that a review of their own performance, because in the end you're going to get the miles and the treatment you deserve. Top Tier Drivers that can handle the big miles and develop great relationships within their company will get the big miles and special favors. The average drivers will get average miles and a favor once in a while, and the low level drivers will get the leftover scraps, if there are any, and shouldn't expect anyone to really go out of their way to do them any special favors.

So when a driver says, "I love this company. I get a ton of miles and they treat me great." then I know they're performing at a high level and getting along well with people.

When I hear terminal rats bashing a large, successful carrier for not having enough freight or not caring about their employees then I know that driver simply isn't performing and likely isn't getting along with the people within the company.

There is no such thing as a major carrier that can not provide you great miles and a fantastic work environment. Whether they choose to do so or not will depend on your abilities and your attitude.

Go out there and be a Top Tier Driver and you'll be happy and successful. Go out there and be a jerk or perform at a low level and you'll find yourself in agreement with the Terminal Rats on YouTube, Facebook, and the trucker's lounges across the country.

Lousy drivers believe there are a lot of bad companies out there. Great drivers believe there are a lot of great companies with great opportunities out there.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Adrian N.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you all for the input. Can anyone offer advice or maybe direct me to articles to read on how to keep a marriage going with being gone so much? I love my wife dearly and worry we might grow apart when I hit the road. She's already crying at just the thought if me not being by her side every night. I try to tell her that it's just a year until she finishes school and it will be hard but to sacrafice a year to have the rest if our lives be financially secure is a small price to pay. I want our 50's to be the best years of our lives! Any advice? I adore my wife but I also live trucking. Is it possible to have both?

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