How I Was Hyper Productive This Week By Knowing The Log Book Rules

Topic 23000 | Page 1

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Old School's Comment
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I'm on a typical multi-stop flat bed load this week. The total miles on the load are 2,076. The first stop in Amesbury, Massachusetts, is 1,530 miles from my starting point in Delhi, Louisiana. From the time they have my load ready in Delhi, I give it all I can to get to Amesbury. That puts me there at three in the morning on Tuesday. I park on the customer's property so I can get unloaded first thing in the morning.

This load load has three more stops. They are as follows...

  • Cranston, Rhode Island
  • Avon, New York
  • North Collins, New York

I need to be empty Wednesday around ten a.m. because my dispatcher already has my next load pre-planned on me. It's a 2,029 mile back haul load with firm appointments already set. Since I got to Amesbury at three in the morning, my ten hour break will prevent me from getting started again until one o'clock in the afternoon. That's a huge problem since the folks in Cranston, Rhode Island (100 miles away) stop receiving at two o'clock. I've got to get that second stop unloaded in Cranston today, and get myself parked on the premises 400 miles away in Avon, New York, set up and ready for the next day.

What do you do?

Well, when I got to Amesbury I shut down and got in the sleeper with 2 hours left on my drive clock. That means if I only do eight hours in the sleeper I'll have two hours that I can drive at that point. This is that mysterious "split sleeper berth" rule.

After taking an eight hour break, I got unloaded and was able to leave Amesbury shortly after 11 a.m. I drove the 100 miles to Cranston, Rhode Island, unloaded there, and did two hours in the sleeper, which magically produced nine hours of drive time for me.

I am now parked on my customer's property in Avon, New York. I'll unload at seven a.m., drive 90 miles to North Collins, and be unloaded right around ten a.m. just like I promised my dispatcher four or five days ago.

He sent me a fun message today referring jokingly to me as "super trucker." He trusts me to do what I say, and therefore he can pile the work on me. Part of being able to keep my word is in working my logs so that I'm as efficient as I can be. To do that effectively, you have to understand how the rules work.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott's Comment
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Great example.

Jason R.'s Comment
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Very nice example of how to maximize your clock, that is great planning and improvising on the fly.

Yuuyo Y.'s Comment
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Too bad the 8/2 split is against policy at Schneider they say.

Old School's Comment
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Yuuyo, there are a few companies that don't allow it. I think it's crazy, but I understand their thinking behind it. Most drivers don't understand how it works, and tend to use it improperly. I think those companies that don't allow it simply want to avoid the log book violations which may come about from a driver not understanding how to properly capitalize on the rule.

Here's a fun tidbit of information...

I actually taught my trainer at Western Express how the rule worked, and how to use it. He had over ten years class A driving experience and still didn't understand it. My training experience was remarkable in some ways. I may have taught more than I learned. confused.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gladhand's Comment
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The split will come in handy tomorrow. I got two deliveries to Costco stores the last one is a small delivery, so I should be done by 800 am and parked down the street from my pick up at post.

Pick up is btwn 1400 and 1800, i could probably do a ten and go to pick up a little later, but dont want to risk there being problems so ill do 8 hrs instead.

Due to the next load being 1236 miles from Pick up and will deliver on the 30th, i need to put in big driving days, to shorten my driving on delivery day. That way I have more opportunities to continue running.

I could make the delivery if I waited around all day and then picked up the load, but I would be driving 575 on delivery day. Makes more sense to flip my schedule and push it hard first and second day. This way I'll make it to Temple, Texas with a good 9 hours or more on the drive line.

I finally understand what you are saying about the miles being our responsibility. The fact that they took off a load with more time on it/same amount of miles and gave me a load with a tighter window, I have to do what I can to prove my worth. Took me 2 years, but I finally get it.

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