Fuel Tankers-are Others Afraid?

Topic 23138 | Page 1

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Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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I've seen tanker posts about food grade tankers but not Fuel Grade, are others afraid to drive them? I drove them for four years and loved it. Are there any fuel grade tanker companies out there? But I was t-boned in an intersection on my motorcycle and I thought it ended my career of driving. but after 5 surgeries and physical therapies I am ready to go back to work again ( just got a release from the surgeon). I know that after eight years I will be a little rusty but I still remember the sequence of how to load and unload tankers. I've just seen mostly people talking about food grade tankers and was wonder why not fuel? So anyone got any hints as to companies that hire?

Patrick C.'s Comment
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The reason you see little talk about tankers and next to nothing on fuel tankers is because this site targets new truckers to help them become successful. Most tanker companies, with good reason, want several years experience before considering to employ someone.

There are basically 2 companies that hire brand new drivers and have tankers. Prime and Schneider. Prime has food grade tankers and Schneider has chemical tankers. So there is the basic rub.

With your experience, I'm sure you will agree that someone with a CDL hot of the press has little to no business trying to kill themselves with surge, let alone be driving around a pipe bomb on wheels.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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Patrick C. Hell No I don't want newbies driving tankers of any sort, I am just trying to figure after eight years of being away, will I have to prove myself again that I can do the job of a fuel tank driver. And if these are the only companies that tanker haulers can work for unless local that is sad. I start back to school in September to get my class A back. So, I talk to old friends that I met on the road when I hauled for fedx ground, they wouldn't even try hauling fuel. Maybe I just have a death wish. Nope! I just like hauling fuel. I worked 4-10's and had a pretty cool schedule. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday off, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday off. But of course that was local driving.

G-Town's Comment
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I am just trying to figure after eight years of being away, will I have to prove myself again that I can do the job of a fuel tank driver.

Yes, you’ll need to prove yourself again, at least to some extent. The 8 year lapse is the issue, and I think you know that. Take it one step at a time.

Patrick C.'s Comment
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You may have to look at Prime or Schneider. Do a year for recent driving experience. That coupled with your past may get your foot in the door. TBH, I rarely see fuel being hauled by something other than a day cab. Which stands to reason as crude oil is mainly transported thru pipelines to refining facilities.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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Thanks you guys just trying to get a feel for the lay of the land. School starts next month, I'll see how the chips fall whether I go out on the road for a year and then go to tankers or stay local.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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I hauled fuel tankers for 2 years. Wasn't a fan, but mostly because of the pay.

8 years ago it was the best job in the industry in my opinion. Since then, BP/Chevron sold their fleets and contracted their work to carriers who will do the same work and pay their employees twice less. It went from a 6-figure salary to 65k.

We both crazy.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Patrick C.'s Comment
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I contacted a food grade tanker company this morning. They were offering what I will make at wolding in 6 weeks. Plus they didn't have any type of bonuses. So I would end up making 5.5 cpm less than I make at Wolding. Thanks, but I will keep you mind, lol. I figure with the pay hikes pretty much industry wide that tankers would be included.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I contacted a food grade tanker company this morning. They were offering what I will make at wolding in 6 weeks. Plus they didn't have any type of bonuses. So I would end up making 5.5 cpm less than I make at Wolding. Thanks, but I will keep you mind, lol. I figure with the pay hikes pretty much industry wide that tankers would be included.

Its my opinion that tankers are way behind where they're supposed to be. Of course this can be debated because there are those jobs that pay extremely well but in most cases its far underpaid in my opinion.

I think LTL is actually overpaid. We in Old Dominion are going to be just under 30 an hour for city and around .72cpm for linehaul.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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Daniel B. I'll keep Old Dominion in mind. I guess I'm at the age I don't want to unload my products. No touch freight is my goal unless delivering fuel. I know most of you guys and gals deliver freight, and that's ok. I started out doing local seasonal work at Panella Trucking and Button Transportation out Stockton, and Dixon California. After that is when I got into tankers. I had a good gig, until our company lost a major Shell contract. I wasn't getting rich but I was comfortable. The thought of going out on the road again is not inspiring. Where you have many companies that keep you out for 3 weeks then send you home, not for me. If you live on the west coast, they will keep you on the east coast for three weeks then give you a load on the west coast, home for a day and a half then back on the road again. Nope, not for me. The bottom line is we all got into this trade to make money and have fun doing it. I'm not trying to keep up with the Jones's, $700 a week with long hours seems small. I just checked Center line trucking and they pay $23 an hour and usually 40-50 hours a week. that's pretty good pay. Your home every night!!!!! Anyway, I'm not knocking freight, I just didn't do much except a fedex job for 8 months, it was drop and hook , but it had to be a team drive. My partner was the laziest person I ever came across. He would wait til I fell a sleep then pull over and sleep for a while, we were always late getting to our destinations. But he was the boss's brother in law and wouldn't change me out with someone else. Didn't end well. Two months later I was involved in a motorcycle accident. Now after eight years and 5 surgeries I'm ready to back to work in the trucking Industry and the kind of work I love. Best to all who listened to me let off some frustration.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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