What Does Averitt Mean By "Dedicated Supply Chain Student Driver?"

Topic 23286 | Page 1

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Marc Lee's Comment
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Looks like this may a good place for me to start, but I am not sure exactly what they mean by "Dedicated Supply Chain". Is this a "route" servicing one customer, e.g. D.C. to stores and back (and forth)? Is it usually local/regional vs. OTR (home every night or weekends)?

Reasons why I ask...

Tuition reimbursement (my school qualifies). Ultimately I really want to drive for a an organization which focuses on the entertainment industry (and similar). Concert tours, sporting events, etc.. Averitt has their On Tour Logistics division to which I could request a transfer after I have some experience under my belt (as I see the value in staying with my "starter" company. ;) (See! I do pay attention here).

Also, I talked to a recruiter who said they go back and forth on this but are now looking for 4 months of experience from new hires. When I asked if they made exceptions he said "yes" and my instructor said "we" (our program) are (is) one of the exceptions.

Any/all info is greatly appreciated.

On other notes...

Passed my HAZMAT exam today!

Selected my CB handle: Roadshow

CB Handle:

This is the nickname people use on the CB

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
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Here is your answer, straight from Averitt’s website.

Click here: Dedicated Supply Chain

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Here is your answer, straight from Averitt’s website.

Click here: Dedicated Supply Chain

Thanks G-Town. Sorry... guess I read that part a while ago... was focusing more on the Student side of it now.

So I guess my questions are really more about training, daily activities, applicability to OTR down the road, etc..

I know about the 3 - 6 weeks or more on a trainer's truck style of OTR training. Also (at a recent job fair) talked to a company that doesn't do sleeper berth training. They ssy they can ride from MKE to their Indy terminal , make deliveries, etc., and teach a newbie what they need to learn without sharing a berth to do it. I can see up and down sides to both.

Do dedicated gigs vary widely based on customer? I can see (from their pix) Cracker Barrel and Federal Mogal for example, might be very different in terms of ease (or lack thereof) of access, freight handling, etc.. Sometimes it is hard to move a full-sized SUV or compact p.u. around a C. B. lot, where I would expect a need to handle freight vs. FM which might be mostly drop and hook (which I am just learning in class but which is no doubt considered easier and potentially faster once one gets it down).

Again, all help appreciated!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

LDRSHIP's Comment
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The only entertainment trucking company I know anything about is Xtreme. They are a subsidiary of Lessors. Lessors is a refer company. The Xtreme side of the house requires 1 year of experience. Xtreme' terminal is in Madison, TN. (North side of Nashville). They provide concert support for the Country Music Tours. Singers such as Brantley Gilbert. They are paid a daily rate for every day out on tour. You are out for the entire length of the tour. Rider policy is based upon individual tours. You have a full access pass as you are part of the tour. You eat with the crew.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

The only entertainment trucking company I know anything about is Xtreme. They are a subsidiary of Lessors. Lessors is a refer company. The Xtreme side of the house requires 1 year of experience. Xtreme' terminal is in Madison, TN. (North side of Nashville). They provide concert support for the Country Music Tours. Singers such as Brantley Gilbert. They are paid a daily rate for every day out on tour. You are out for the entire length of the tour. Rider policy is based upon individual tours. You have a full access pass as you are part of the tour. You eat with the crew.

Thanks Patrick. Hadn't heard of them...do know of several others but many seem to do all or mostly tour. Seems like a division of a larger company may be a better point of entry for a newbie.

I appreciate the info..

I think Rolling Thunder drives for Averitt OTL. Is he still around here?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Old School's Comment
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Rolling Thunder drives for Averitt OTL. Is he still around here?

It's been a little more than a year and a half since we've heard anything from him. I'm not sure what he's up to these days.

Marc Lee's Comment
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Rolling Thunder drives for Averitt OTL. Is he still around here?

double-quotes-end.png

It's been a little more than a year and a half since we've heard anything from him. I'm not sure what he's up to these days.

Bummer! He's my hero!

OK, role model. As of last post I saw of his, he is doing what I'd like to be doing (at this point in my life, anyway) and possibly where I'd like to be doing it.

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