How Do I Get Background Information?

Topic 23300 | Page 1

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Roy1024's Comment
member avatar

This is a question about how to get all your background information, before your potential employer gets it. My problem is that I lived in one state (Texas) for 30 years, and have long since forgotten some details about my driving record, except that the only ticket I remember paying was not in that state. [I did not have a CDL then.] I tried to get a copy of my driving record directly from TxDOT, but if you must have more than just your old license number to obtain that record off the TxDOT website - they also want some other data that is on your physical license - data I do not have. I also need to see what a potential employer is going to see when they get the driving record from the state where I am pretty sure I ended up paying a fine. - But how do I get that record? - I don't have a license number for that state? I am asking for advice here before I take the expensive step of hiring an attorney just to obtain information about myself that (obviously) potential employers can get. Oh, and I played around with some of those websites that claim to find data about anyone - got back a bunch of totally wrong data (maybe because I have a very common name)? Hopefully no potential employer uses those web sites! Anyone who has direct knowledge of how companies do background checks, and more importantly, how I can see the exact same data they will see, would be much appreciated

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

I would also like to know how this is done. It seems that background checks are different now then they were when I drove before and had to quit because of my motorcycle accident. I start school on September 17th, and I have a perspective employer already. My DMV record is clean.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Jrod's Comment
member avatar

Go to HireRight and ask for a "CDLIS+" report.

It will list every drivers license number you have ever had in the US - some states go back as far as 30-40 years. It won;t give you dates, or violations, but it will list the state and the license number, so you can then run an MVR.

If you fill out an app with me, I'll run you one and send it to you...

I don't want to link or list a phone number, because this is a not the place for recruiting or advertising, but if you reach out to Brett, he can contact me and I will send you the info you need to contact me.

Good luck!

This is a question about how to get all your background information, before your potential employer gets it. My problem is that I lived in one state (Texas) for 30 years, and have long since forgotten some details about my driving record, except that the only ticket I remember paying was not in that state. [I did not have a CDL then.] I tried to get a copy of my driving record directly from TxDOT, but if you must have more than just your old license number to obtain that record off the TxDOT website - they also want some other data that is on your physical license - data I do not have. I also need to see what a potential employer is going to see when they get the driving record from the state where I am pretty sure I ended up paying a fine. - But how do I get that record? - I don't have a license number for that state? I am asking for advice here before I take the expensive step of hiring an attorney just to obtain information about myself that (obviously) potential employers can get. Oh, and I played around with some of those websites that claim to find data about anyone - got back a bunch of totally wrong data (maybe because I have a very common name)? Hopefully no potential employer uses those web sites! Anyone who has direct knowledge of how companies do background checks, and more importantly, how I can see the exact same data they will see, would be much appreciated

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

CDLIS:

The Commercial Driver’s License Information System (CDLIS) is a nationwide computer system that enables state driver licensing agencies (SDLAs) to ensure that each commercial driver has only one driver’s license and one complete driver record.

A drivers file will include their driving record as well as their medical certification status.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Roy1024's Comment
member avatar

Jrod, Is the "background check" just an MVR and Credit Bureau inquiry, or is there more? I've received my new Passport and TWIC card; what else would there be? Oh, and I lived in five different states prior to 1979, is the background check likely go back that far? I certainly do not have any records about license numbers, addresses, or anything else from that far back (except some college transcripts). When you say "If you fill out an app with me, I'll run you one and send it to you...", do you mean an MVR or a "background check" (whatever that really is)? Thanks!

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Roy1024's Comment
member avatar

Got my response back from HireRight....mostly "no information". Given all the reports about every facet of our lives being in some database somewhere, it is pretty weird that a background investigation would come up with " no information" on someone my age (70). I wonder if that is going to sit too well with potential employers, unless HireRight is not telling me everything they know?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
it is pretty weird that a background investigation would come up with " no information" on someone my age (70).

Well HireRight focuses on CDL drivers. That's the information they're most concerned with is reports from your previous employers regarding your driving experience with them. Jrod has dealt with them way more than I have, but I wouldn't expect them to have much of anything on you other than relating to CDL work.

Trust me when I say this, though - any criminal background or significant events you have will be found by the major carriers. That's something they're exceptionally good at. Arrests, DUI's, failed drug tests, etc - they have amazing resources.

One story that always stuck with me was a guy in orientation with me one time. They called him in and asked him why he didn't list a certain company in his employment background. It turns out he never worked for the company, but 8 years prior he had been to a job interview with them. They didn't hire him. Yet somehow the company found out about that. I remember the look on his face when he said, "How in the world could they have found out about a job interview I had 8 years ago for a job I didn't even get???"

None of us had the answer to that.

There are trucking companies out there who will give almost anyone an opportunity, especially if their recent background is solid. If you've been working and staying out of trouble in recent years it's almost a certainty that someone will give you a chance. If, however, they find out you've purposely tried to hide something from them your application will go straight into the garbage.

When they ask you a question, answer it honestly but do not volunteer anything they did not specifically ask for. If they ask you if you've been in prison in the past 10 years and you got out of prison 10 years and 1 day ago then the answer is "No" and leave it at that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Roy1024's Comment
member avatar

Brett, O.K. Thanks - that explains the HireRight deal, I guess that Jrod did not realize that I don't have any recent CDL experience (but I drove a private bus for a college back in the 1960's - I have no memory if I had to get a CDL then). I think my concern stems from not understanding the hiring process in this industry, which is clearly night-and-day different from any hiring / selection process I have ever experienced before.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

My company cares about the last 3 yrs of employment and driving if you werent a CDL holder. DUI amd criminal history is another story.

its better to say you dont rememeber than to appear to.lie.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

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