Tanker As Opposed To Linehaul

Topic 23343 | Page 1

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Scott B's Comment
member avatar

I have been driving for about 1yr and a half..It was the best decision I ever made besides asking my wife to marry me but I originally wanted to do tanker because my best friend drive tanker since the early 90's. I started off with my first true driving job "my first 2 were a mess" but I found a home here with experienced drivers willing to help me any way they could. I would still love to do tanker but I bring home roughly 1100 on a decent week and 1250 on better ones. I like linehaul but not sure if the money would justify switching.So any thoughts. My best guess for the future at my company is roughly 78k but that's just a guess..Side note truckers get a bad wrap and labeled as lazy but I have met some pretty cool people and hard workers willing to bust their ass to get ahead. Let's see a new college grad do that.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

Where are you working now? Tanker has the surge challenge. What does your friend think? Are you currently OTR?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Scott B's Comment
member avatar

I am not OTR , overnight yes but home weekends. Drive for R&L and my friend said in the beginning get experience and stay clean and get all the endorsements you can.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Scott I pull a tanker. Second time around. It's a different animal. You get used to the surge. Main thing to remember is it is unforgiving. You MUST get your speed adjusted before making movements. With most other trailers it isn't as critical. I love it. You will still have sitting time, but that will be getting washed out instead of a dock somewhere.I'm waiting now for mine, but if I want to go somewhere else I can. Also most tank farm workers are a cut above your typical warehouse worker. Much easier to work with. Money shouldn't be your main focus in my opinion.You have to enjoy what your doing.

Amish country's Comment
member avatar

Is it liquid tanker or dry bulk? I do industrial and feed dry bulk and love it. Can't see myself doing anything else and was lucky enough to have the opportunity to start my career in it. I know someone that does linehaul for OD and he is happy there. A lot of night driving and he is all over the northeast at the moment until they rebid.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

Where do you live? Are you not happy at R&L? Why do you want to change?

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I run Linehaul for Old Dominion and love it. There is a lot of night driving until I have move up on the seniority list that so far is the only down side, I personally don't see myself leaving as long as they will keep me.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

I did tankers before and loved it! But it is a different animal as Pj said. You get used to it. Since I have a gap of 8 years I will have to do refer or dry van before going back to tankers but I am ready to get back to it. Just remember you can't take corners as with a dry van though. But slow and steady maneuvers is the key. My experience is with fuel and liquid nitrogen. Both have their different challenges. You need a level head. Anyway I saw this thread and the talk of tankers excites me. But I have never done food grade so I have no opinion on this type. But are you not happy with R & L??

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Scott B's Comment
member avatar

No I love it there. I was just interested in the challange of tank. Like I said it's my first driving job and experience is probably key with different trailers, tanker, dry van flat bed. If an opportunity comes up I didn't want to turn it down though due to lack of knowledge. I live I New Jersey so there are plenty of companies around but we hope to move in the next couple years to north or south Carolina. I appreciate all the interest an help everyone has to offer.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Cwc's Comment
member avatar

No I love it there. I was just interested in the challange of tank. Like I said it's my first driving job and experience is probably key with different trailers, tanker, dry van flat bed. If an opportunity comes up I didn't want to turn it down though due to lack of knowledge. I live I New Jersey so there are plenty of companies around but we hope to move in the next couple years to north or south Carolina. I appreciate all the interest an help everyone has to offer.

Could you transfer with R and L? I did about the same thing your doing. I started asking questions about 6 months out. And I also moved to the Carolinas.😆

I run food grade tanker. I'm not sure I'd want to go back to a dry van. But with that said R and L is a great company. So be sure it's worth the jump to you.

Surge is just a word on a DMV test... until you feel it for the first time.

I won't lie. I've felt it enough that it has scared the crap out of me. I now drive slower than old people xxxk. But I do like getting out and doing more than just swinging barn doors.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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