Split Sleeper Birth Question

Topic 23380 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
David John's Comment
member avatar

Question - Is this right?

Is it possible, in the scenario as pictured, that a person can drive 12 hours in a 24 hour period using the split sleeper birth rule?

In the scenario pictured, do the FMCSR HOS rules for split sleeper allow a driver to reset the 14/11 clocks at the end of each of the pictured breaks?
That is, if a person takes a 2-hour break, followed by an 8-hour in sleeper break, followed by a 2-hour break, can the 14/11 reset happen at the end of each of these breaks 2, 8 & 2 ?

I am in training, with CDL-A in hand, but yet to complete orientation and drive with the trainer. I have been reading FMCSR HOS rules, working through the High Road Training and simply constructing HOS situations and trip plans for thought. This is one.

In life, I have had the sense that ‘routine’ is a good thing for the body and mind. From what I am reading, I am expecting ‘routine’ to be the exception rather than the rule in the life of a truck driver, but having a sense for an ‘ideal’ to look toward seems to have merit.
I have been thinking that it would be nice if I could sleep between 8pm-4am, drive 4hrs, off 8am-10am, drive-4hrs, off 2pm-4pm, drive 4hrs, sleep 8pm-4am
This as an ideal ‘routine’, if/when possible.

It would appear, if I am correct, that the split sleeper HOS rules allow for this, 2 off, 8 sleep, 2 off, model with 4 hours of driving between each break. (And I am sure these 4hrs also include pre-trip and fuel and ... of on-duty not driving, but I’m simplifying by considering all on-duty as driving).
And if the HOS rules allow for this, it appears that at the beginning of each break a driver would have a minimum of 4 hrs/3 hrs remaining on their clocks if additional driving time was required to make it to a destination.

Is this correct?
It is very possible I am confusing the details, or that elog devices would not allow this option, or ...

Perhaps another question would be simply - Do you as a driver look toward a ‘routine’ in your driving day/times, or do you go with the flow and drive when able and take time off when at loading/unloading locations?

Input on the question is much appreciated. Input and thoughts on the routine of driving as well.

Thank you!

0790423001536760396.jpg

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

David, there's nothing routine in an over the road driver's schedule. I flip-flop my nights and days constantly just to be productive.

You can legally drive 12 hours (even more) in a 24 hour period while spending 10 hours in the sleeper. You don't have to resort to the 8/2 split. But either way it's legal.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

In your scenario, and using your reference #s 1,2,&3.

Upon completing #2, your 14/11 would reset at the end of #1.

Upon completion of #3, your 14\11 would reset at the end of #2.

The 14/11 wouldn't reset after #3 unless you complete yet another 8 hour break in- sleeper.

Like OS said above, with a 10-hour break in your day you can legally drive up to 13.5 hrs in a 24 hr period. Ex. Start at midnight. Drive till 5 and take a half-hour break. Finish your 11 driving at 11:30. Take your 10 hour break and start driving again at 9:30pm till midnight again = 13.5 hrs driving that day.

David John's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Old School & Turtle!

The reality of time being driven by production rather than ‘routine’ is becoming more clear.

Turtle, your note regarding the reset after #3 revealed my mistake. I was trying to take the 8+2 to reset at the end of #3, and that is not the way the HOS regulations work. It is a reset at the end of the 1st break of the two breaks (ie. at #2) as you made clear.

Old School’s comment about more than 12 hours in one day did result in a ‘head slap’ moment for me.
As you mention the 13.5 hours, I was realizing this and also 7 on either side of the 10 could achieve the complete 14 in a day. In some sense I see this as borrowing from the days before/after, but truly the limiting factor, if one is able to push that hard for many days in a row, seems to be the 70 hour in 8 days.

Thank you for the input!

In your scenario, and using your reference #s 1, 2, & 3.

Upon completing #2, your 14/11 would reset at the end of #1.

Upon completion of #3, your 14\11 would reset at the end of #2.

The 14/11 wouldn't reset after #3 unless you complete yet another 8 hour break in- sleeper.

Like OS said above, with a 10-hour break in your day you can legally drive up to 13.5 hrs in a 24 hr period. Ex. Start at midnight. Drive till 5 and take a half-hour break. Finish your 11 driving at 11:30. Take your 10 hour break and start driving again at 9:30pm till midnight again = 13.5 hrs driving that day.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
It is a reset at the end of the 1st break of the two breaks

Yes this! It's the part that most people who don't understand the split have trouble with. It's even harder to explain the split here in written form. But you seem to be on your way to getting it.

I understand your desire for a routine. I was the same way, and that's kind of why I chose flatbed. It tends to be the most routine of all the divisions, I think. However, you can never count on anything being routine in this business. That's why I would not suggest using the split in the fashion you described, at least not all the time. Save it for when you need it. Just like everything else, you'll figure it out in much more detail as you go. Something as simple as an unplanned 2-hour shipper delay can put you in a position where the split will be to your advantage.

I wish I had more time to elaborate, but I gotta roll.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris M's Comment
member avatar

I understand your desire for a routine. I was the same way, and that's kind of why I chose flatbed. It tends to be the most routine of all the divisions, I think. However, you can never count on anything being routine in this business.

I just wanna second this really quick. I've done refrigerated, dry van , and now flatbed. I have definitely found flatbed to be more prone to some semblance of "routine" regarding day-night cycles at least. This really comes down to the fact that there are a higher percentage of customers who are not 24 hour facilities. A lot more 7am - 5pm places.

I typically am able to do 4/5am starts the vast majority of my days, fit my driving/loading/unloading into a 12ish hour window and repeat. As of the last 4 weeks, I'm averaging 3311 miles per week. Unless you're on a strict dedicated route , that is very rare in the dry van/reefer world.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David John's Comment
member avatar

I understand your desire for a routine. I was the same way, and that's kind of why I chose flatbed. It tends to be the most routine of all the divisions, I think. However, you can never count on anything being routine in this business.
— Turtle

I just wanna second this really quick. I've done refrigerated, dry van , and now flatbed. I have definitely found flatbed to be more prone to some semblance of "routine" regarding day-night cycles at least.
— Chris M.


Old School has mentioned his appreciation for flatbed as well.

Flatbed is definitely under consideration. I am also interested in tanker, prefrably non-hazmat, this based on comments Brett has made and also the comments and feelings of a number of my instructors (all long term drivers with time pulling a wide variety of trailers).

I will begin with dry van or refer both because Brett recommends this and because this is the path my company has me on at present. This door opened a step or two back and the path is clear, as it were. The other options will be there when I’ve had a chance to experience this first step.

The input is great!
It is fun, or funny, trying to figure out all of the pieces as early as possible while knowing it really will be, and must be, a process while on the road.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More