40, Single, Already Living Out Of My Car (100% By Choice)...and Have Been Offered A Buy-out To Leave My Company...oh, And No Degree

Topic 23541 | Page 1

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Solo's Comment
member avatar

Recently ended a 10+ year relationship and thankfully without involving a divorce, shared banking, kids or anything else that you would typically find in a long-term relationship.

My company of 11 years is offering me a package to leave by the end of the year (though I can decline and stay...but I'm not really sure I want to).

I don't have a degree, which is the only reason why I've stayed with this company for so long. They pay me way more than anyone else would and the benefits are great. I leave here and try getting a similar career going with another company and I'll see 50% decrease in salary and a 1/3 increase in responsibilities, in fact, during my current companies last RIF I did shoot out my resume for the same title at various companies and those that did reach out to me offered me 50% less.

I've chosen to live out of my hybrid as I was only using 1 room of my 2/2, nearly $2k/month apartment, and save $1735 + util/month in making this move....so figured living out of a MUCH bigger semi-cab would be a pretty easy transition (Which stater mega offers the longest OTR (out on the road for x (a lot of days) vs y (just a few days))? Since I could reasonably get rid of my car and make my new truck my home and just grab a hotel on resets, etc.

So at this point, I'm just staying with this business for the money and benefits, but who knows when the offers stop and the forced out(s) arrive. I drove truck/trailer back when I was a kid in the Army and really wanted to drive for Schnieder upon ETS, but my dad said "NO, you're going to college" or something along those lines....and here we are 18 years later.

I would love to hear some feedback from those that may have been faced with a similar scenario and the path you chose or if you could get the option again, what would you do.

Thanks for reading.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Roy1024's Comment
member avatar

You have to figure out your own situation. But do not fool yourself into thinking that not having a fixed place to call "home" will automatically work long-term. It does not take long for hotel bills to be more than rent on a small place in a less expensive part of the country. It might work for you, or it might not. The only other comment I can make is: ask yourself, are you running from something, or are you running toward something? You owe yourself honest answers, and act accordingly. There are many, many cautionary posts on this forum about the pitfalls that may catch you on the way to becoming a professional truck driver. Asking others to answer the tough questions you need to answer for yourself probably says you are not ready to make a decision.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

Start with these.

After reading Brett's book, you still think this is for you, start reading through some training diaries. Then look at Paid CDL Training Programs.

I was trained by and drive for CFI. I have a friend here who does not have a home. You will need a physical address for your DL, however some people use a box at a UPS store. Any OTR company will love a driver who doesn't go "home". It is possible to use "home time" at hotels, or to do things like see a ball game or whatever you want. With no rent or other bills, all you have to pay for is phone and food. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
(Which stater mega offers the longest OTR (out on the road for x (a lot of days) vs y (just a few days))? Since I could reasonably get rid of my car and make my new truck my home and just grab a hotel on resets, etc.

None of them care if you just want to stay on the road. There is no required home time at any OTR carrier that I know of. You will want some down time occasionally, and you can easily request that they route you to Oregon, or Florida, or maybe Las Vegas for a break. You can tell them you would like to take a few days off up in Maine, and see if they can work out some freight going that way. Many people do this and are quite content living a Gypsy like lifestyle. By the way, I'm not sure if you realize it, but 34 hour resets are not a requirement, though at times they become a necessity due to managing your hours in such a way that you absolutely need to reset your 70 hour clock. You can actually go for weeks at a time without doing a 34 hour reset if you manage it right. Some folks love to do them, and for others it really irritates them that they are sitting idle out on the road, when they would rather be at home while idle.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

I’m one of those that doesn’t have a physical home. That’s due to my wanting to save that rent money & get rid of my debt. Doing that as I write this. I’ve taken hometime at a temple in Elburn, IL 2x, in NYC (where I’m from), just did a 34 here in Florida with my daughter & stepson. I sleep in the truck to save on hotel bills. My mindset & obligations are my own. I make due with what’s available to me.

I don’t watch TV. I rarely go to movies. I try to remain focused on my spiritual practice & listen to national news on a limited basis. If I need to know it, I’ll find out about it eventually. That said, what’s been said before is spot on. Only you know what you want out of life. Read the info provided, if you still want to dive in, do it with as much clarity as you can find in those links. We’re here to support those that give it their all & call out those that think they know more than the seasoned pros that are on here. I’m by no means putting myself in that category yet. I’m here because they’ve helped me immensely & I feel it my duty to return the favor in kind. Good luck with your journey & process going forward.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Solo's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the feedback guys. I'm currently making my way through the links above as they're posted in nearly every thread, so I figured a day or two ago it's just where I need to start.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Rainy gave up her home too, so hopefully she'll chime in.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

The already mentioned advice is spot on. The beauty of this industry is its diversity. I’m single, but do maintain my home. I have personal vehicles there and all my stuff. You do have to maintain some address as your home of record for your cdl as well as other legal issues, i.e. taxes and life stuff. My dispatcher loves me because I really don’t care where I go. Makes his job easier. I just tell him when I want some time off and where and he works it out. I go home in Ga, or go out to ca and see my grandkids. I have also consulted the nascar schedule and made a couple apperances there. It’s all about what you want out of life. Best of luck too you

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Solo's Comment
member avatar

You do have to maintain some address as your home of record for your cdl as well as other legal issues, i.e. taxes and life stuff. My dispatcher loves me because I really don’t care where I go.

I'm a North Dakota resident by law, but work elsewhere, due to NDs very very nomadic friendly lifestyle laws, and have a mail forwarding service. USAA insures me and takes no issue to my nomadic ways either (provided I don't actually get an apartment or stay at one physical address longer than 90 consecutive nights), and thankfully thus far neither does the IRS.

Thanks for your reply.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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