Is A Dedicated Run A Good Thing?

Topic 23667 | Page 1

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Omar C.'s Comment
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I've been on the sidelines here reading and taking in all the advice you guys have for us beginners. I went to a company sponsored program. received my CDL after a few short weeks and spent 3 weeks with a great trainer. I still call him when ever in a jam. He has been a great mentor. So now I stand six weeks of solo, which have been great this far except for my truck breaking down 3 times. But I guess that's trucking. In the last couple of weeks my DM has pitched me the idea of doing a round trip dedicated run. I have followed your advice here on this forum and have not turned down or complained about any load assigned to me. Some have been great, others well I would rather not do again. But I'm not in any way complaining to him about what he gives me. I take every load assignment with enthusiasm. I get it there on time or early to set myself up for the next one. ok back to the dedicated run. Is this a test? Is it a push a side? Is it a sign he trusts me? I always thought dedicated runs were what drivers wanted, steady miles, a familiar route and with possible more home time. But if it's that desired why is a 6 week rookie getting a try at it? Is it a horrible route nobody wants? Or I'm I just over thinking this whole thing?

Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Probably overthinking. Dedicated doesn't necessarily mean the same places. It could be for a specific customer too. Me personally, I love the adventure of going to different places, so I'd probably not want a dedicated linehaul or the exact same route day in and day out. But, Old School, for example, he drives for Knight, on their SAPA account. He goes all over, but just to SAPA locations. Conversely, GTown does dedicated for Walmart out of a DC, tends to run the same routes and is home daily. Both dedicated, but very different scenarios.

Ask your dispatcher what kind of dedicated account it is and what you can expect. You might love it or hate it, but only you can decide.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Omar, without any details, we are hard pressed to advise you.

I think you should just tell your dispatcher you'd be willing to give it a try for a month or two to see if you like it. Just make sure he understands that you want the option of returning to what you're doing now if you don't like it. I don't think he's trying to trick you or punish you. Oftentimes when there's a position to be filled like this the dispatchers are offered some incentive for finding a good driver to handle it.

One thing we never recommend to new drivers are the "Dollar Store" dedicated gigs. You should ask him if it's for a "Dollar Store." If it is then I don't think it would be wise to pursue it just now. Those jobs are really tough with a lot of difficult backing situations and pretty intensive physical labor unloading the trucks.

I am on a dedicated flat bed job. It's never the same route, but all the loads are for the same company. I am still basically running over the road , but the familiarity you build with the lanes and the customers definitely helps you with trip planning and knowing where available parking is. I make really great money as a dedicated driver, and definitely would recommend it to others. My situation may be unique, but it works really well for me.

I don't know if I've helped you or not, but I just don't have enough information from you to know how to advise you.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Omar C.'s Comment
member avatar

I guess I would need to try it out and see how I like it.

Thank you.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Omar you really need to ask some questions of your employer. If I were to guess, this smells like Dollar General. Very difficult account for a rookie.

Please try to get more information.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

G-Town is right sounds like Dollar General or Tree. Get more details for sure. I ran that account for 3 months. What company do you work for if you don't mind me asking?

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

I guess it's natural to be skeptical when a new opportunity comes along. I was offered a dedicated position after 3 months OTR. I was afraid it was gonna be a Dollar General or similar account. I asked right away where I'd be located, if I had to load/unload, how often I'd be home, and how I would be paid. I'll give you the stats on my account as an example that not all dedicated accounts are the same.

The warehouse I pick up from is 10 miles from my house and the drop yard where I keep my truck and park my car is halfway between. Trailers are preloaded and when I get to a customer they unload it. I deliver to 6 DC's, one each in Maine, NY, VA, OH and 2 in PA. For 5 of the runs I'm out overnight and home for about 12 - 15 hours every other day. One of the runs I get home the same day for about 10 hours. They pay me $80 for each trip plus mileage for the round trip. One drawback is that I rarely get a FULL day off. I miss the adventure of being OTR. I actually enjoyed driving OTR more but, I traded that for better pay and the comforts of home.

I hope you get an opportunity that works for you. And like everyone has said...Get all the information you can before deciding.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Omar C.'s Comment
member avatar

I didn't get too specific about where I work or what account I was offered. I'm not sure who reads this forum and I would hate be reprimanded for sharing details.

I drive for Knight out of the Fontana, CA terminal. I chose to drive the western 11 states when I was asked where I wanted to run. The idea of driving all 48 sounds appealing but I like to have home time every 3 weeks.

I was offered a dedicated run for States logistics, It runs from Buena Park, CA to Twin Falls ID and back to Buena Park.

Hope this helps

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

To me, that sounds like a great account. Only you can decide what's right for you.

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