Gym Time Powerlifting And Strength Training While On The Road.

Topic 24024 | Page 1

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Thanos's Comment
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I want to talk about something that I never see anybody talking about on forums and that is what's the best commercial Nationwide gym to belong to keep muscle that you've built?? And I'm not talking about just staying in shape. I'm talking serious hardcore lifters. Thanks, Mark from Bakersfield California.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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You will be hard pressed to find a gym with truck parking nationwide

LDRSHIP's Comment
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You will be even harder pressed to find the time to lift often enough.

Pete B.'s Comment
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Planet Fitness and Anytime Fitness are the two gyms I’ve seen most often around the country; if you drive for one of the ‘mega carriers,’ you may find workout facilities in the OCs. Schneider’s dry van OCs have fitness rooms that would suffice, with a mix of dumbbells and machines.

Your biggest challenge will be finding gyms along your pickup or delivery route; you would be well-served to get creative and develop a routine you can use in/around your truck. It can be done; I’ve seen several drivers who looked pretty huge.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

I was looking into this somewhat (not for hardcore lifting) but just to keep active, maintain, and not turn into the nutty professor (eddie murphy version) on the road. There are truckstops that have gyms and the membership also allows you access to other gyms ( I want to say it was TA and Golds as well as Shape maybe). It wasn't too difficult to search and the TS website shows which locations have gyms. Regardless, I went a different route and invested in Core Fitness's Adjustable dumbbells (5-50lbs). I've always used dumbbells for most of my workouts to begin with and don't do anything that involves more than 50lbs now given my age. Bench exercises will be a bit of a challenge on the road, but I'll come up with something. Aerobics will be more of a challenge in my opinion; I've never had trouble maintaining mass after I hit 20 years old or so.

Also, if you do a youtube search, there is some guy with a major company who talks on this topic, though it looked like a lot of his video was his diet more than exercise program (not sure though, i got bored with it and quit watching).

If you are hardcore though (3 hours or more a day) I don't really think it is going to work out with the job if you want to make money as well. I've always been a person who only needs 5-6 hours sleep, and even being that type of person, I can tell you that driving an average of 500 miles a day will catch up with you after 2-3 days even without working out hard. Not to mention, maintaining mass (above your body's comfort zone, which it sounds like what you're getting at) means consuming calories, also not conducive to or safe with the driving schedule to be successful.

Granted, this is all from someone who is not yet on the road, so maybe I'm misinterpreting the info I've studied up on so far about a typical work schedule and responsibilities in trucking. But when people talk of trouble scheduling a shower every 2-3 days, then I have to imagine a workout at an actual gym offers a bit greater challenge (not even taking into account parking at a regular gym). From what I've learned on this forum and other resources, you basically should be able to do or at least be equipped to do all you want in your home (truck), because you might stop, but the clock and dispatch never do, and when you're stopped, so is your pay.

Before you tear into me about 10 hour breaks, the clock still isn't really stopped when you're on a 10 hour, because other people in your company (the competition as I think Old Skool pointed out in one of his articles) are taking/running loads that could potentially be yours if you work your clock and stay in touch with dispatch correctly.

This makes me think of a question that could possible help us both though....How do you veterans on here manage your downtime? Specifically, you using it just to exercise, relax, and sleep, or is there some scheduling/trip-planning or other things you do to increase your efficiency and productivity (paycheck)?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Trucking is a lifestyle.

Power-lifting, especially the competitive version is also a lifestyle. Mark you need to think about how many hours you spend in the gym per week and realize a commitment to full time trucking may not support your desire to continue power lifting. You will need to make a choice.

If you peruse some of the threads on this forum; things like finding time to shower, eating healthy, regular sleep schedules and elongated wait times at shippers/receivers are frequent challenges presented to all OTR drivers. From the sounds of your initial post, “lifting” is a major part of your life. This career path, especially as you are absorbing the first 12 months learning curve is demanding, unforgiving and will require 100% of your focus.

Yes it’s possible to maintain fitness while doing this, but no where near approaching what you want to do.

I suggest giving this link a read so you better understand what you are asking:

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Good luck!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Aubrey isn’t quite right...

Before you tear into me about 10 hour breaks, the clock still isn't really stopped when you're on a 10 hour, because other people in your company (the competition as I think Old Skool pointed out in one of his articles) are taking/running loads that could potentially be yours if you work your clock and stay in touch with dispatch correctly.

Aubrey overall I understand and agree with your point...

However the clocks; each have a different function and rules.

Drive clock: Only moves as you drive. 11 total hours, up to 8 total allowed until the 30 minute break is completed. This is a daily clock and will reset after a 10 hour break and/or a 34 hour reset.

Daily on-duty clock. Once started; it will not stop. Once 14 hours have been depleted, you cannot legally drive until completing a 10 hour break or 34 hour reset. You can however continue working (not driving) beyond 14 hours.

70 hour on-duty clock (aka 8-day clock). This clock only moves if on-duty or on-duty driving. If off-duty it will stop. Once it hits 0 you cannot legally drive until either completing a 34 hour reset or gaining hours from a recap (if they are available)

For more detail click here:

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Thanos's Comment
member avatar

Thanks but where there is a will there is a way. I could definitely understand how someone who's not into my lifestyle can easily say there no time for strength training. But I can just as easily say some of the weird habits/Hobbies I see other truck drivers do.. That I wouldn't have the time for any of that either.They make the time for their weird stuff and I'll make the time for my weird stuff. After listening to some of the responses I'm going to choose Planet Fitness they're always off of freeways open 24/7 and they have free showers so I wouldn't have to worry about that too much. Another thing I wanted to point out there's a lot of people saying that i wouldn't have the time to spend that much time in the gym. Well, my workouts are only Monday Wednesday and Friday and they only last 45 minutes long. I follow a conventional Colgeiate wrestling/College football program I focus on big compound barbell movements none of that fluff and puff crap that doesn't work.I do the overhead press, various styles of deadlifts, squats, bench press, and the barbell row it doesn't take any time to do this workout especially if you go after it hard as hell.

Trucking is a lifestyle.

Power-lifting, especially the competitive version is also a lifestyle. Mark you need to think about how many hours you spend in the gym per week and realize a commitment to full time trucking may not support your desire to continue power lifting. You will need to make a choice.

If you peruse some of the threads on this forum; things like finding time to shower, eating healthy, regular sleep schedules and elongated wait times at shippers/receivers are frequent challenges presented to all OTR drivers. From the sounds of your initial post, “lifting” is a major part of your life. This career path, especially as you are absorbing the first 12 months learning curve is demanding, unforgiving and will require 100% of your focus.

Yes it’s possible to maintain fitness while doing this, but no where near approaching what you want to do.

I suggest giving this link a read so you better understand what you are asking:

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Good luck!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It’s obvious you are committed to powerlifting. That’s great...you will need an equally strong commitment to learning the trucking career.

Mark...not going to argue with you further. I think your expectations are a bit unrealistic... especially during school and while road training with your first company.

I urge you to read this: Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

And this: Truck Driver's Career Guide

...before rendering any further replies.

You know a lot about weightlifting but nothing about the demands of this career or how-to be successful at it.

Totally cool if you think you are “right” and that your “will” alone will enable you to maintain your passion. Your priority however will be to move the freight...until you learn how-to do that safely and efficiently, it’s unfortunately your only priority and powerlifting will take a back seat to exhaustion.

I sincerely wish you luck.

Thanos's Comment
member avatar

Just a heads up, I also design workouts for peoples individual goals, what equipment they have access to, injuries they may have, how much time they have for training etc. If you guys need me for anything about training just ask.

Thanks but where there is a will there is a way. I could definitely understand how someone who's not into my lifestyle can easily say there no time for strength training. But I can just as easily say some of the weird habits/Hobbies I see other truck drivers do.. That I wouldn't have the time for any of that either.They make the time for their weird stuff and I'll make the time for my weird stuff. After listening to some of the responses I'm going to choose Planet Fitness they're always off of freeways open 24/7 and they have free showers so I wouldn't have to worry about that too much. Another thing I wanted to point out there's a lot of people saying that i wouldn't have the time to spend that much time in the gym. Well, my workouts are only Monday Wednesday and Friday and they only last 45 minutes long. I follow a conventional Colgeiate wrestling/College football program I focus on big compound barbell movements none of that fluff and puff crap that doesn't work.I do the overhead press, various styles of deadlifts, squats, bench press, and the barbell row it doesn't take any time to do this workout especially if you go after it hard as hell.

double-quotes-start.png

Trucking is a lifestyle.

Power-lifting, especially the competitive version is also a lifestyle. Mark you need to think about how many hours you spend in the gym per week and realize a commitment to full time trucking may not support your desire to continue power lifting. You will need to make a choice.

If you peruse some of the threads on this forum; things like finding time to shower, eating healthy, regular sleep schedules and elongated wait times at shippers/receivers are frequent challenges presented to all OTR drivers. From the sounds of your initial post, “lifting” is a major part of your life. This career path, especially as you are absorbing the first 12 months learning curve is demanding, unforgiving and will require 100% of your focus.

Yes it’s possible to maintain fitness while doing this, but no where near approaching what you want to do.

I suggest giving this link a read so you better understand what you are asking:

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Good luck!

double-quotes-end.png

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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