Onboarding With J.B. Hunt Amazon: Hair And Urine Tests Tomorrow! 1/7/19 Start Date

Topic 24036 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Marc I read a couple of your replies about CPM vs mileage. Think about why JBH is offering you 54cpm as a rookie. It’s because you will be hard pressed to run 1800-2000 miles per week. Dedicated accounts can be very demanding, with aggressive SLAs in place that will challenge you to the core.

Amazon is in a very time-sensitive business, I think you know this. Since you are at the root of their supply chain you will be pushed many times beyond your rookie ability to perform satisfactorily.

Learning the ropes of this account; the routes (primary & secondary), the process and the most efficient ingress, docking and egress at each DC is critical to success. Managing your on-duty clocks will become a primary focus necessary to maximize your performance.

I strongly suggest to approach your training on this account with an attitude of humility and coachability beyond what was applied during school. Please don’t be insulted by this, but you know virtually nothing and only have an inkling if what to expect running this account. Be the “sponge” during your training, absorbing it all, making keen observations, taking notes when applicable and on-you to adjust to the style of your trainer.

Good luck!

Ah yes, I did see this.

I am curious to see exactly what this job entails. I originally assumed it was a linehaul type situation, but with only 2,000 miles per week, and stop pay, that doesn't seem likely.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Marc I read a couple of your replies about CPM vs mileage. Think about why JBH is offering you 54cpm as a rookie. It’s because you will be hard pressed to run 1800-2000 miles per week. Dedicated accounts can be very demanding, with aggressive SLAs in place that will challenge you to the core.

Amazon is in a very time-sensitive business, I think you know this. Since you are at the root of their supply chain you will be pushed many times beyond your rookie ability to perform satisfactorily.

Learning the ropes of this account; the routes (primary & secondary), the process and the most efficient ingress, docking and egress at each DC is critical to success. Managing your on-duty clocks will become a primary focus necessary to maximize your performance.

I strongly suggest to approach your training on this account with an attitude of humility and coachability beyond what was applied during school. Please don’t be insulted by this, but you know virtually nothing and only have an inkling if what to expect running this account. Be the “sponge” during your training, absorbing it all, making keen observations, taking notes when applicable and on-you to adjust to the style of your trainer.

Good luck!

double-quotes-end.png

Ah yes, I did see this.

I am curious to see exactly what this job entails. I originally assumed it was a linehaul type situation, but with only 2,000 miles per week, and stop pay, that doesn't seem likely.

The low mileage is an indication of where he is driving (cities, urban), the type of driving (local perhaps) and multiple stops each day. If I recall it’s out and back at least once.

Once he is in training and begins to understand the lay-of-the-land, I hope he can tell us exactly what the job entails.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

This sounds more like a shuttle type situation, where it will be going from Amazon A to B to C and probably D and E every day as well. We have a Amazon warehouse right across the street from our terminal and there are a lot of JB Hunt trucks coming and going.

I just hope he doesnt get stuck doing intermodal , which was a possibility if I remember from a few weeks ago. Most of those Chicago intermodal yards are brutal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I just hope he doesnt get stuck doing intermodal , which was a possibility if I remember from a few weeks ago. Most of those Chicago intermodal yards are brutal.

I did Chicago intermodal in training and the local.drops yards do indeed suck!!!! We went as far out as Anderson In, KY, MO, IL WI.... so that is 5 of his 7 state regional right there. So youz guyz (in my jersey accent) are probably right.

The worst yard I went to I had to back down the street FOUR whole.blocks at night cause there was no turn around. And there were so working street lamps.

Good luck

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More