Merry Christmas!! Transitioning From Seasoned Driver To Other Trucking-industry Positions.

Topic 24120 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Any progress with the High Road CDL Training Program?

If you are truly serious Todd; the above is what you’d be doing right now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bird 's Comment
member avatar

Hey Todd I'm curious maybe off topic but did you use your GI bill when you got out? And I see you were a mechanic while you were in that couldn't go anywhere for you when you were discharged?

Todd Holmes's Comment
member avatar

Hey Todd I'm curious maybe off topic but did you use your GI bill when you got out? And I see you were a mechanic while you were in that couldn't go anywhere for you when you were discharged?

I was a civilian mechanic two years after I got out in 1995 worked as a postal employee for a while then as a roofer for a while and went to community college for a couple of years, 1997-1998 and again in 2000 for civilian auto tech training. I did use GI Bill benefits for that. In 2001 I gave up mechanic work for a business venture that failed after one year. In 2003, not able to find mechanic work, I worked as a janitor. In 2004-2005 I worked for a landscaper. From 2006 through 2015 I was a live-in caretaker for my elderly uncle. My back went bad in 2015 so I went on the VA pension for disability. Voc/rehab put me through a 2-year associate's degree program I computers which I completed this last spring. I decided I don't want to work in IT. Sitting at computer workstation all day long hurts my back the worst of anything. My father and his brother have both had arthritis and it runs in the family. My uncle was paralyzed from the waste down from a fused spine and was on steel crutches. My father continued to work as an electrician for the Dept. of the Navy for ten years in spite of his arthritis which was nearly as severe as his brother's. He died at age 45 in a car wreck while still working in full capacity as an electrician. Drunken motorist, young punk, crossed the line as he was commuting home from work.

SilverBullet's Comment
member avatar

He is not serious, it’s old news. Todd has made it clear he has no more than a casual curiosity about trucking, likely never going beyond where he is now. Is that a bad thing, negating him to the ranks of unwelcomed? We’ve chastised him in the past...no need to force fit a square peg into a round hole.

Perhaps educating him as part of the general public will help to spread the real truth about truck drivers and change the assumption we are all a bunch of uneducated, unclean, and nasty people. Unless you want him to think we are a “bag of di**s”, let’s change the tune of the replies to something slightly better than rude.

C’mon guys show some charity to the guy, be kind and answer his questions without beating-him down. We’re better than that.

‘‘Tis the Season.

“Yes Todd”, there are opportunities beyond the driver’s seat. Most companies prefer their office and management staff have some driving experience. Many of the trucking executives, captains of the industry started as drivers. A cursory review of the mega-carrier’s website will reveal a consistent, grad-roots history. I suggest giving that a look, you might find it interesting.

For me personally? If I am no longer able to drive, it’s doubtful I’d submit to flying a desk full time ever again. I love to drive...it’s the primary reason I am in this.

“It’s all about the journey, not the destination.”

That's right G-Town. Treating people..... with respect, courtesy and Professionalism is the way to treat them. People reducing themselves to name calling and belittling new-comers only make you, this website and the rest of the industry look bad. Not only to the members but to advertisers (future advertisers as well).

You know getting into the trucking industry is an extremely tough decision for most folks. I relate it to the decision I made to join the Military. Either you take the leap of faith into the "unknown" abyss or you regret not doing it. So many things to consider for sure.

Personally, I'm finding the whole process completely and entirely overwhelming. A person's current circumstances also make these types of decisions very tough. The OP maybe sticking his toes in the water and asking a lot of questions. GOOD FOR HIM ! His questions ARE helping other people ! What is wrong with that ? Nothing.

Keep asking questions Todd and hopefully the old dogs here will keep things civilized and help ALL of us newbies !

Answer to your question is Yes. All you listed.

BTW, not everyone wants to be a Top burner running their face into the ground seeing how much money they can make. More power to them though if that's what they choose. Money is NOT everything and running your face off has consequences on your family and home life. Bottom line is you can NOT have it all. No matter how hard you die trying.

Some folks are quite content to get out there, do an honest days work for an honest day's pay and come home to their family as much as possible. What's wrong with that ? Nothing.

Judge not least YOU be judged.

God Bless and Merry Christmas back to you !

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

SilverBullet's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hey Todd I'm curious maybe off topic but did you use your GI bill when you got out? And I see you were a mechanic while you were in that couldn't go anywhere for you when you were discharged?

double-quotes-end.png

I was a civilian mechanic two years after I got out in 1995 worked as a postal employee for a while then as a roofer for a while and went to community college for a couple of years, 1997-1998 and again in 2000 for civilian auto tech training. I did use GI Bill benefits for that. In 2001 I gave up mechanic work for a business venture that failed after one year. In 2003, not able to find mechanic work, I worked as a janitor. In 2004-2005 I worked for a landscaper. From 2006 through 2015 I was a live-in caretaker for my elderly uncle. My back went bad in 2015 so I went on the VA pension for disability. Voc/rehab put me through a 2-year associate's degree program I computers which I completed this last spring. I decided I don't want to work in IT. Sitting at computer workstation all day long hurts my back the worst of anything. My father and his brother have both had arthritis and it runs in the family. My uncle was paralyzed from the waste down from a fused spine and was on steel crutches. My father continued to work as an electrician for the Dept. of the Navy for ten years in spite of his arthritis which was nearly as severe as his brother's. He died at age 45 in a car wreck while still working in full capacity as an electrician. Drunken motorist, young punk, crossed the line as he was commuting home from work.

Didn't see your a Veteran as well. Thank you for your Service brother! What Service where you in ? What was your MOS ? When/where did you serve ?

Sound like you and your family has been through hell. I have personally seen many Veterans in your situation. I just Retired from the Veteran's Administration and saw more than I care to see.

Keep plugging away in your research and don't forget to pray and let God guide your path. He WILL show you the Light.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bird 's Comment
member avatar

Goodness hell Todd that is rough. Hopefully you can get it together, and get that cdl. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Serenity's Comment
member avatar

The bottom line with me: the MONEY. It's all about the money.

If it weren't about the money, nobody would give two dams about this work. The smell of a fresh crisp dollar bill still keeps me remotely interested.

I can't think of an easier way out of poverty can you? ...I am 54 years old. I don't feel like going to college at my age to get a bachelor's degree while slaving over textbooks. ..

My two unwarranted and unrequested cents: I would hope that you would see more in it than "the MONEY". If you don't like anything about a job aside from the money, it's always going to seem like a chore, and you will start to dread every waking moment of it.

I would not say that trucking is an "easy way" out of poverty. Sure, you could look at it like you have a roof over your head, as small as it may be, so you don't have to worry about being homeless...unless you really screw up and lose your job, hence your "home" as well. Sure, you can eliminate a lot of expenses by living in your truck, but don't you think that living in your truck and doing this for a living takes more than it just being about "the MONEY"?

On the other hand, at 54, you're going to face age discrimination in the tech field. People don't like to admit that it goes on, but it goes on. They always say they went with someone "more qualified" so the feel good laws do nothing, but rest assured, going back to get a bachelor's for tech is not going to erase the age discrimination you're going to get. That's just a fact. I was told in the past, however, when I asked how old was too old to get started in the industry, that you don't really see that in trucking. As long as you can pass the physical and all the tests plus the training, you would be set.

Why not just start with that? You don't have to get into it right away, but at least take the test, see if you can pass it. At least get a physical, see where you are in terms of health. Taking the test and getting a permit doesn't mean you're required to go further with that. Why not just start there.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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